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View Hesed's profile

How would you create this profile

by Hesed
posted 11-23-2016 09:59 PM


6 replies so far

View UncannyValleyWoods's profile

UncannyValleyWoods

542 posts in 1770 days


#1 posted 11-24-2016 12:03 AM

I’d lay money on it being just a standard 1/4 inch round over. Those boards look like .5” boards, so the bit would have to be set pretty low in order to get the board to ride the bearing. This will make the profile less pronounced and along with some sanding, give it those nice lines..

-- “If Jesus had been killed twenty years ago, Catholic school children would be wearing little electric chairs around their necks instead of crosses.” ― Lenny Bruce

View jerryminer's profile

jerryminer

888 posts in 1347 days


#2 posted 11-24-2016 08:30 AM

Looks similar to a “thumbnail” profile. could be a custom cutter.

-- Jerry, making sawdust professionally since 1976

View Hesed's profile

Hesed

36 posts in 3562 days


#3 posted 11-24-2016 09:57 PM



Looks similar to a “thumbnail” profile. could be a custom cutter.

- jerryminer


I think that’s it, thanks!

View realcowtown_eric's profile

realcowtown_eric

608 posts in 1843 days


#4 posted 11-26-2016 04:17 AM

That and sanded with peumatic sanders (seen in video) which do marvelous jobs of easing curves

Eric

-- Real_cowtown_eric

View Hesed's profile

Hesed

36 posts in 3562 days


#5 posted 11-26-2016 05:11 AM



That and sanded with peumatic sanders (seen in video) which do marvelous jobs of easing curves

Eric

- realcowtown_eric


Interesting. What makes a pneumatic sander better/different? I’ve never used one.

View realcowtown_eric's profile

realcowtown_eric

608 posts in 1843 days


#6 posted 11-30-2016 05:02 AM

I have several pneumatic sanders, the larger one sees the greatest use for sanding top edges of drawer components (Baltic birch) where a few quick passes, it sands off the saw marks, and holding at 45 degree angle, eases the edge. quite fast and easy It is set up to mount in the drill press as are my deburring wheels and vairious other grinding polishing wheels. I could easily have mounted them in the lathe too.

Back in the eighties, I bought one from Busy Bee up here in Canada, and recently replaced it when the original one devloped a leak. Unfortunately I cannot find a URL for it, But Busy bee in Canada is but a faint image of Grissley tools in the USA

It looks similar to this and appears to be equally able to be chucked in your drill press.

http://www.grizzly.com/products/T27150?utm_campaign=zPage&utm_source=grizzly.com

The pneumatic sander is also the penultimate for sanding curved shapes which have beem cut to “fair” curves, as it does not dig ini but rather makes the curve “fairere” removing bandsaw marks and variances in “fairness” such as in guitar necks, curved music stands, cabriole legs., etc Anybody who has used rigiid sanding drums will have experienced the ripples that result, not so much with pheumatic sanderswhich don’t leave the ripples

Just my thoughts. Wouldn’t be without them.

Regards

Eric

-- Real_cowtown_eric

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