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All Replies on Pulled the trigger on a Delta 36-725 table saw today. Buyers remorse???

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View HalfShirt's profile

Pulled the trigger on a Delta 36-725 table saw today. Buyers remorse???

by HalfShirt
posted 11-12-2016 09:36 PM


39 replies so far

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

7739 posts in 2153 days


#1 posted 11-12-2016 09:52 PM

Sure you probably could “away with a job site saw” ... but I think with the better saw, your cabinet build will go smoother, and once you get used to it you wont be saying “Geeze, I wish I had gotten the better saw.”

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

View 01ntrain's profile

01ntrain

257 posts in 1216 days


#2 posted 11-12-2016 10:02 PM

Return it? Are you kidding? Your gut told you to go out and buy the saw, you went thru the trouble of getting it at the store, and getting it home. Don’t you trust your gut?

Joking aside….those two other saws are great for what they are. A jobsite saw. You pre-qualify by saying that the saw will be used for ongoing home renovations, and that’s fine….but the cost of those saws are pretty close to the Delta, and it’s a much better saw, IMO. Better fence, better motor, better dust-collection, and much more work surface to do cuts.

Trust me, if you had bought either saw, within 6 months you would be experiencing REAL buyer’s remorse.

View lumberjuniorvarsity's profile

lumberjuniorvarsity

77 posts in 1041 days


#3 posted 11-12-2016 10:26 PM

Take your time setting it up and start using it. There’s lots of good info here: http://lumberjocks.com/reviews/3822

You’ll love it, especially once you start getting into woodworking more. I’m pretty much the same as you. Lots of DIY and home renovations, learning lots about woodworking, 2 car garage w/ a wife’s car that needs to go in during the winter. There’s no way I’d get a jobsite saw, no matter how good they are – at least not with cabinet making (or any more advanced woodworking) in your future.

My 2 cents.

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

3526 posts in 2135 days


#4 posted 11-12-2016 10:32 PM

It will be great for you. Stop worrying, set it up and make sawdust.

Be safe!!!!

View DirtyMike's profile

DirtyMike

637 posts in 1048 days


#5 posted 11-13-2016 01:02 AM

Compared to the other saws you mentioned I believe you made a good choice. Just curious did you consider the used market any?

View mrbob's profile

mrbob

182 posts in 715 days


#6 posted 11-13-2016 01:21 AM

Actually life is so better without a SO, unless she make more $ then you, then it is a REAL power struggle.
You have the whole garage, dont have to ask for permission/forgiveness, ect.
You did make the right choice on the saw!!

View hotbyte's profile

hotbyte

991 posts in 3122 days


#7 posted 11-13-2016 02:31 AM

Been very happy with mine. Good friend has a Dewalt job site he really likes but he actually moves it from location to location doing side jobs. Not sure what all you will be doing on your house, but in addition to table saw, get a nice, upper end circular saw if doing framing type work.

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10332 posts in 1632 days


#8 posted 11-13-2016 02:36 AM

Get a jobsite saw if you like really loud motors, smaller space in front of the blade, and crappy fences in general.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View Gaffneylumber's profile

Gaffneylumber

103 posts in 975 days


#9 posted 11-13-2016 02:44 AM

Yea job site saws just have a flimsy feel to them even though I’m sure they could fit your needs. There is no better feeling in woodworking than sliding a board over a smooth cast iron top.

-- Grayson - South Carolina

View kingpong's profile

kingpong

11 posts in 960 days


#10 posted 11-13-2016 02:57 AM

After 15 years or so doing typical DIYer work with a jobsite saw that I didn’t have a problem with beyond a fence that was tough to get parallel to the blade, I recently bought a 36-725. The first cuts I made on the new saw were revelatory. I still can’t believe how much better of an experience it is using this saw vs. a jobsite saw. Kicking myself for not having bought a contractor or cabinet saw years ago.

Speaking of returns, this is actually my second unit – the first one was so damaged once I opened it that I had to return it. Looked like another box had been dropped on it, bending all the panels a few inches. Doing all the loading/unloading solo from an SUV of a box that has 60 pounds on me multiple times was not fun, but the first cut made it all worthwhile.

View HalfShirt's profile

HalfShirt

31 posts in 1026 days


#11 posted 11-13-2016 05:25 AM

Thanks for the reassurance everyone. I know it was the right decision, I have been researching my new saw for the last 6 months after I sold my old Craftsman before moving. For at least 4 months I have been pretty sure this was the table saw for me based on this forum and a few reviews on other websites. Unfortunately, I never had a ton of time while in the store to really look it over. I know it sounds crazy, but the reality is every time I was in there I would look at it while passing and really couldn’t get in depth with it as I almost always had one of my kids with me. Today, I was there alone and was a bit overwhelmed by the size. Also, ask my wife, I get a little twitchy when I’m buying a big ticket item and start to second guess it. I work hard for my money and I don’t want to have regrets. I have watched the used market near me and nothing ever really popped up. I just moved to a new city so transporting a large used saw and getting it loaded and unloaded without any help would have been problematic. I know I made the right decision, just need a little more reassurance from those that really know what they’re talking about. Thanks. I’m excited to get this thing set up and running.

-- Why is there never enough time to do it right, but always enough time to do it over?

View jtm's profile

jtm

230 posts in 1782 days


#12 posted 11-13-2016 07:54 AM

I have an old Craftsman 113 series table saw that I added a few upgrades to, one of which was the Delta T3 fence.

This also happens to be the fence on your Delta table saw, and it is fantastic. It really makes the saw.

There is no comparison between your Delta and those jobsite saws.

View toolie's profile

toolie

2144 posts in 2774 days


#13 posted 11-13-2016 02:29 PM


..........overwhelmed by the size…....

- HalfShirt

“Overwhelmed by the size?”...... guess that rules you out for a cabinet saw in the future. Moving tools alone isn’t that hard if the appropriate time is taken.

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

5072 posts in 4106 days


#14 posted 11-13-2016 03:29 PM

Get good blades. I use 3 styles. Rip, crosscut and combo (for general use).
Unless you’re going into production work, the contractor saw will do a good job for you. As others will add, assemble it dead on. Don’t rush it.
Enjoy.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View Carloz's profile

Carloz

1147 posts in 738 days


#15 posted 11-13-2016 03:54 PM



Compared to the other saws you mentioned I believe you made a good choice. Just curious did you consider the used market any?

- DirtyMike


And here come junkers with their “After spending n years on craigslist and spending only $800 on gas I got a terrific deal on a table saw. It needs replacing motor and is missing the table, cabinet and trunnions, but I will keep looking on craigslist for the missing parts. YOU SHOULD HAVE TOO”.

OP you did good. That is one nice saw, much better than the other two unless you need to carry it somewhere far.

View HalfShirt's profile

HalfShirt

31 posts in 1026 days


#16 posted 11-13-2016 03:55 PM

..........overwhelmed by the size…....

- HalfShirt

“Overwhelmed by the size?”...... guess that rules you out for a cabinet saw in the future. Moving tools alone isn t that hard if the appropriate time is taken.

- toolie

At the present time, a cabinet saw is out of the question. I need the flexibility to move it easily and storage is a tremendous consideration given the amount of space I have to work with. Someday, hopefully, I will have a dedicated shop, but not all of us have that luxury at the moment. Additionally, I maxed out my budget with this saw. I don’t have $1k plus for a cabinet saw and that’s what they have been going for around here on the used market. I looked a little bit and too be totally honest, never too seriously. I don’t want someone else’s headache and I’m not ashamed to admit I like things that are new. I like warranties, and I like to know that my stuff has never been abused. Also, I have had 5 addresses in the last 7 years. This won’t be my last house, but I will be in this space for at least the next few years so I have to work with what I have.

-- Why is there never enough time to do it right, but always enough time to do it over?

View HalfShirt's profile

HalfShirt

31 posts in 1026 days


#17 posted 11-13-2016 04:00 PM

And here come junkers with their “After spending n years on craigslist and spending only $800 on gas I got a terrific deal on a table saw. It needs replacing motor and is missing the table, cabinet and trunnions, but I will keep looking on craigslist for the missing parts. YOU SHOULD HAVE TOO”.

OP you did good. That is one nice saw, much better than the other two unless you need to carry it somewhere far.

- Carloz

Appreciate it Carlos. I’m for sure keeping it. In my gut I know I made the right call and I’m excited to get it set up.

-- Why is there never enough time to do it right, but always enough time to do it over?

View HalfShirt's profile

HalfShirt

31 posts in 1026 days


#18 posted 11-13-2016 04:03 PM



Get good blades. I use 3 styles. Rip, crosscut and combo (for general use).
Unless you re going into production work, the contractor saw will do a good job for you. As others will add, assemble it dead on. Don t rush it.
Enjoy.
Bill

- Bill White

Thanks Bill. I’ll follow that advise for sure. Any brand recommendations? I usually buy Diablo blades, but I’m open to trying something new. I also have no plans on installing the factory blade so I’ll be picking something up this week.

-- Why is there never enough time to do it right, but always enough time to do it over?

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

1723 posts in 1944 days


#19 posted 11-13-2016 06:48 PM

I think it’s a good starter saw.After you get all the home renovations done you might out grow it.
A good blade is a must I would pass on the Freuds Low end blades.
Get a better one then that .

Aj

-- Aj

View HalfShirt's profile

HalfShirt

31 posts in 1026 days


#20 posted 11-13-2016 07:18 PM


I think it s a good starter saw.After you get all the home renovations done you might out grow it.
A good blade is a must I would pass on the Freuds Low end blades.
Get a better one then that.

- Aj2

What should I consider? Their industrial line of blades?

-- Why is there never enough time to do it right, but always enough time to do it over?

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

3526 posts in 2135 days


#21 posted 11-13-2016 07:20 PM

I use the Freud blades and normally order on Amazon.

I use a 24 tooth Freud thin kerf blade most of the time and is about $40.

I also use a combination blade or cross cut blade for getting good cross cuts.

I also use a plywood blade 80 tooth Freud for $80.

View DirtyMike's profile

DirtyMike

637 posts in 1048 days


#22 posted 11-13-2016 09:12 PM

Compared to the other saws you mentioned I believe you made a good choice. Just curious did you consider the used market any?

- DirtyMike

And here come junkers with their “After spending n years on craigslist and spending only $800 on gas I got a terrific deal on a table saw. It needs replacing motor and is missing the table, cabinet and trunnions, but I will keep looking on craigslist for the missing parts. YOU SHOULD HAVE TOO”.

OP you did good. That is one nice saw, much better than the other two unless you need to carry it somewhere far.

- Carloz

Carloz I for one i am really tired of your hateful post. I find it strange how new your account is yet you seem to know everything. The used market can be a great place to save money and get great tools. I was curious if the op was one of those that did looked but decided against it. I bought an american unisaw and dewalt radial arm saw for less than 300 bucks total this summer. yes there are great deals and yes there is a lot of overpriced junk. You should come over to my shop and check them out.

View Rob_s's profile

Rob_s

251 posts in 768 days


#23 posted 11-14-2016 04:53 PM


Compared to the other saws you mentioned I believe you made a good choice. Just curious did you consider the used market any?

- DirtyMike

And here come junkers with their “After spending n years on craigslist and spending only $800 on gas I got a terrific deal on a table saw. It needs replacing motor and is missing the table, cabinet and trunnions, but I will keep looking on craigslist for the missing parts. YOU SHOULD HAVE TOO”.

OP you did good. That is one nice saw, much better than the other two unless you need to carry it somewhere far.

- Carloz

Carloz I for one i am really tired of your hateful post. I find it strange how new your account is yet you seem to know everything. The used market can be a great place to save money and get great tools. I was curious if the op was one of those that did looked but decided against it. I bought an american unisaw and dewalt radial arm saw for less than 300 bucks total this summer. yes there are great deals and yes there is a lot of overpriced junk. You should come over to my shop and check them out.

- DirtyMike

I’m new here, and I get tired of the “buy a used thing and fix it” posts as well. Use that to infer whatever you like about my experience (forum time rarely means anything relative to real-world time).

If the various posts on this and other forums are to be believed, used saws that just need a little work are falling from the craigslist sky. However, in the real world, some people would prefer to get started with their hobby now rather than wait for the unicorn to appear, especially when they know that the unicorn will come with a broken horn and one chipped hoof, and half the tail missing.

We are all super-happy for those of you with the regional benefit, time, and experience to pursue the used market and get your great deals. But telling every new guy “you should have got a used saw like I did” isn’t a productive answer 90% of the time Reading through various threads here, it would appear that virtually no-one actually follows that advice. They may live to regret it but they basically never take the advice.

-- www.facebook.com/therealbnrlabs

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

3526 posts in 2135 days


#24 posted 11-14-2016 05:44 PM

Rob_s I think that you will be sent to time out for saying something like that and will get a bunch of angry replies.

However, I agree with you. If you can find one, it is in good shape, you can get parts, and have time and money …it is a good idea. Some members here have done outstanding work restoring old equipment. I tip my hat to them.

It is not for everyone. I would rather be making sawdust than restoring old machines but that is me. We see a lot of success stories but I bet there are a number of people who fail at it. Not everyone has the necessary skills.

Every time someone posts about buying a new saw, someone will say they should watch for used. If someone suggested to me to buy used and restore, I would just ignore it.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

6935 posts in 2345 days


#25 posted 11-14-2016 06:04 PM

Carloz I for one i am really tired of your hateful post. I find it strange how new your account is yet you seem to know everything. The used market can be a great place to save money and get great tools. I was curious if the op was one of those that did looked but decided against it.
- DirtyMike

Don’t fret it Mike… there are some who just don’t get it and probably never will. And their attitude is pretty well expressed by stuff like this:

If the various posts on this and other forums are to be believed, used saws that just need a little work are falling from the craigslist sky. However, in the real world, some people would prefer to get started with their hobby now rather than wait for the unicorn to appear, especially when they know that the unicorn will come with a broken horn and one chipped hoof, and half the tail missing.
- Rob_s

If you have that ‘gotta have it now’ itch, you lose… or you will most likely wind up sacrificing in the name of expediency. I’ve found tons of absolutely fantastic deals on new and used equipment over the years, and in virtually every case, there were two common elements:

  • I did not have a pressing need. The purchase was either an upgrade to a machine I already had, or one of those ‘gee, it would be kinda nice to have one of those [fill in the machine name here]’ type deals.
  • I stumbled across those deals without really looking for them. Not having the need means not having any sense of urgency, allowing much greater selectivity in what you are willing to accept, or the money you are willing to pay. You don’t have to accept a Unicorn with a broken horn if you don’t want to. Typically, 5 minutes a day is all that is spent looking for stuff. Done along with waking up, checking my e-mail and drinking my morning coffee.

To the OP… you now have a fine machine, much better than the others you were looking at, that will serve you well for your present needs. But you also express a desire to move into cabinet and furniture work in the future, so now is your opportunity to be thinking about the future and possible upgrades to your shop. The time to start looking is before it becomes urgent – use it to your advantage.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

8129 posts in 3522 days


#26 posted 11-14-2016 08:41 PM

You bought the best new saw in your price range IMO. The most significant advantage of a portable is portability. If you don’t need that feature, just about all other aspects of a portable are a downgrade from a good full size stationary saw.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View huyz's profile

huyz

58 posts in 1007 days


#27 posted 11-14-2016 09:33 PM

Congrats on the new saw! I chose this based on lots of recommendations online and on Lumberjocks and have been using the same one for almost a year now.

Also I’ve been using the stock blade and JUST this month upgraded to a lower end Freud D1060X, which I use for both ripping and cross cutting. Everything comes out super smooth compared to the stock blade—wish I upgraded sooner.

My main problems with the saw are the extension wings on the tabletop aren’t 100% flush with the cast iron top—maybe it’s my fault. My first 36-725 had improperly milled miter gauge slots too that didn’t allow the gauge to slide all the way through. I didn’t figure this out until a few months in and returned it, had to re-set up everything again. And my latest “problem” on this is the arbor is too short to fit anything wider than a 0.75”+ dado stack. I do wish some things were improved, but at this price not sure if I can expect it. Hope that helps!

View HalfShirt's profile

HalfShirt

31 posts in 1026 days


#28 posted 11-15-2016 12:13 AM

To everyone who posted, I appreciate the feedback tremendously. As I previously stated, I decided to keep the saw and am excited to get it assembled and start using it. I know there is bigger and better out there, but I have a feeling this will suit my needs just fine right now and most likely for many years to come.

Now on a side note, it was never my intention or expectation when I originally posted for this to get out of hand regarding new versus used. In my humble opinion, to each their own on that subject. Nobody is an idiot for buying new if that is what they prefer and nobody is an idiot for buying used if that is what THEY prefer. As I stated I like new things, sorry if that offends someone, but it’s the truth and I shouldn’t have to apologize for it. Second, I don’t have the time to hunt for a used cabinet saw or the means to transport and move it. I needed (need is subjective) it now and wasn’t prepared to wait however long for it to come along. Some people don’t mind the “hunt”. I have a full time job, a family, a house I’m in the middle of remodeling where I’m the majority of the labor, and other things to do. That’s just me and the “hunt” isn’t something I enjoy. Finally, I don’t enjoy fixing machines. I hate working on cars, engines, machinery etc. I can do it, but don’t enjoy it. In fact, I’m dreading assembling this table saw. If you enjoy it, good for you, have at it and I will never criticize it. I love fixing houses, remodeling, and building things. So let’s agree that everyone has their own opinion and nobody is right or wrong. I joined this community to learn and seek advice and that’s how I would personally like to continue.

In closing, thanks for everyone’s reassurance. Now I have a table saw in my garage that I need to go put together, but have to go pickup a case of beer first. I read on this forum it’s a 4 beer job. Seeing as I don’t plan on assembling it in one sitting, I think a case will work.

-- Why is there never enough time to do it right, but always enough time to do it over?

View Garret D., Rock Run's profile

Garret D., Rock Run

72 posts in 1942 days


#29 posted 11-15-2016 12:32 AM



Thanks for the reassurance everyone. I know it was the right decision, I have been researching my new saw for the …
- HalfShirt

I would suggest that you make a table saw sled almost immediately. Like the first project out. That way, you don’t put it off and off, and you get the better cuts and the safety from using the sled. Good luck!

View Dustin's profile

Dustin

557 posts in 887 days


#30 posted 11-15-2016 08:15 PM

OP,

I’ve got the same saw, and have been enjoying it quite well. For blades, it’s hard to go wrong with a Freud P410. One caveat: if you get the P410t, that’s the thin kerf version, and will prevent you from using the riving knife on the saw (unless, as I’ve read from others, it’s sanded/ground thinner first, though I’ve not personally done that).

-- "Ladies, if your husband says he'll get to it, he'll get to it. No need to remind him about it every 6 months."

View BrettLuna's profile

BrettLuna

56 posts in 708 days


#31 posted 11-15-2016 08:37 PM



[...]Any brand recommendations? I usually buy Diablo blades, but I m open to trying something new. I also have no plans on installing the factory blade so I ll be picking something up this week.

Congrats on the saw. I’ve had my 36-725 for about 3 years now and it’s still going strong. My two cents about using and maintaining the beastie:

1. Make sure the dust shroud stays tight. I use my 4” dust collection hose with an adapter which puts some extra weight on the port. It came loose enough to contact the blade once. The noise and sparks were a bit alarming, so say the least.

2. Take it easy on the fence lock handle. I was a bit heavy handed in the beginning and it eventually snapped off. Fortunately, the newer 5000-series saws use the same handle and locking cam so they were still available from Delta and not all that expensive.

3. Blades — I’ve been getting great performance from Infinity blades: their 24T glue line rip and 80T ATB crosscut blades. I think they offer a lot of bang for the buck. I have a Leitz combination blade but I don’t really use it all that much.

-- Brett — Peters Creek, Alaska

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

8129 posts in 3522 days


#32 posted 11-15-2016 11:56 PM

+1 on Infinity saw blades. They’re some of the best I’ve used, and are competitively priced. If you want just one all purpose blade, set it and forget it type blade, it’s hard to go wrong with the Infinity Combomax Lite 010-150. At 0.098” kerf width, it should work fine with the stock riving knife. The 24T ripper 010-124 and 60T 010-060 are an awesome two blade team.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View Medici's profile

Medici

50 posts in 727 days


#33 posted 11-16-2016 02:21 AM

I’m actually satisfied with the few times I used my cousin’s 36-725. You just gotta get used to it. You said you’re a beginner, and you’re off to a good start with a good table saw.

Also – Don’t crap all over Lowe’s because you couldn’t find help in tools/hardware during typical contractor hours. You’ll get used to it as you go back for more stuff. :P

View TwoThumbBruce's profile

TwoThumbBruce

36 posts in 3162 days


#34 posted 04-22-2018 12:52 AM

Halfshirt, thanks for your post and also everyone’s answers. I’m in the looking stage now and all this information is very meaningful. Now to talk to the boss….

BYW, are there any add-on’s that can be attached to the 36-725?

-- Bruce, Florida

View BFamous's profile

BFamous

167 posts in 267 days


#35 posted 04-22-2018 12:05 PM

I have the exact saw saw, inherited it from my dad two years ago along with so many other tools my two car garage looks like a bad episode of Horders. I have to roll all of my tools out into the driveway to get any real work done at this point, so the mobile base is much appreciated. (I do have aspirations of someday extending my garage so I can actually organize it, maybe in about 20 years when I’m done all of my other house projects lol).

I have to say I’m very happy with it for my needs. I use it for all kinds of projects from cabinets to small boxes, to tables, to ripping reclaimed barn wood, etc… I rarely have any issues (other than blowing a fuse now and again when I put too much strain on that circuit). I make certain to keep a good blade in there which is appropriate for the task, which is very important in my humble opinion.
I also take the time to clean it and maintain it.

Take care of it and it’ll take care of you. If you outgrow it, and have the need, space, and finances for a true cabinet saw you’ll know it and can always replace it then. But in my two years of fairly heavy usage of mine, I’ve never really felt that burning need yet. I may WANT one, but I definitely don’t NEED one.

-- Brian Famous :: Charlotte, NC :: http://www.FamousArtisan.com

View darthford's profile

darthford

612 posts in 2070 days


#36 posted 04-22-2018 08:02 PM

I need the biggest and best table saw money can buy, because I suck at wood working. Yet all the wood work in my new construction house, Hickory, Oak floors, stair posts, the fit on all these joints is amazing yet they guys were using some cheap contractor saw…wait for it…that sat on the floor it wasn’t even on a stand. So I don’t know skill and experience vs quality of machine I guess.

View mzimmers's profile

mzimmers

202 posts in 4061 days


#37 posted 06-24-2018 04:05 PM

Interesting thread. I too am trying to decide on a saw, and it’s not an easy decision. While I have the room for a cabinet saw, the budget isn’t supportive of that decision. I refuse to buy inferior tools (a principle instilled into me at an early age by my father), so a compromise is in order. The used market in this area is dismal, so I’m at a bit of an impasse. I do like the OPs choice, and may go that route myself.

My expected usage isn’t really heavy-duty. I am going to be rebuilding a deck, and will probably go with tigerwood (anyone priced redwood lately?), so I’ll have to be able to saw through 1” (5/4) hardwood. This is the main thing that’s keeping me from going with the Delta right now.

As far as the tool vs. skill discussion, that’s pretty easy: a good tool can’t overcome poor skill, but a bad tool can defeat good skill. Friends don’t let friends buy from Harbor Freight.

-- M. Zimmers

View AM420's profile

AM420

164 posts in 530 days


#38 posted 06-24-2018 04:24 PM

I have the Dewalt 7491 mainly because I work out of a 1car garage and everything has to squeeze into a storage closet when I’m not working. If I had the space to keep a larger saw like the Delta for $100 more, even if just pushing it against a wall. I’d do that.

Also I appreciate your comments on new versus used. I buy new myself because I’m new to WW and don’t know all that much 8n general, let alone enough about the tools to know if something use from CL will be useable or a lost cause I’m throwing money away on. Plus, I’m also limited on time/transportation too. I’d rather spend time becom8ng a better woodworker than a tool restorer.

View mzimmers's profile

mzimmers

202 posts in 4061 days


#39 posted 06-24-2018 04:44 PM

AM420: I tend to agree on the new vs. used. I’ve never regretted buying a new woodworking tool. I’ve bought two used (a Unisaw and a band saw) and both entailed more work to get “right” than I’d have liked.

Buying used isn’t necessarily a bad thing, but it takes patience, a discerning eye, and a little luck. I’m not blessed with any of those qualities…

-- M. Zimmers

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