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Need help choosing my first re-saw blade

by DrTebi
posted 11-02-2016 07:35 AM


29 replies so far

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

3529 posts in 2135 days


#1 posted 11-02-2016 12:44 PM

I have been using the Wood Slicer on my 16” Jet and it works well but does dull quicker than a carbide blade.

The carbide toothed blades are too much based on how much I resaw. A member here has had good luck with the SuperCut carbide impregnated blades. I have one ordered to try it out and I should be getting it soo.

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4993 posts in 2498 days


#2 posted 11-02-2016 12:49 PM

Timber Wolf makes some great blades.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View martyoc's profile

martyoc

44 posts in 1064 days


#3 posted 11-02-2016 12:55 PM

I also use a Wood Slicer on my 14” Delta band saw and have had very good results. I recently resliced over 400 pieces of walnut to 1/8” thickness with excellent results. The blade has been left on the saw for most other cuts as well.

-- Marty O'C

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

2682 posts in 3068 days


#4 posted 11-02-2016 01:41 PM

I found woodslicer blades to dull quickly so I now use “SuperCut” carbide blades. A SuperCut 1/2” re-saw blade 105” long costs $25 and last at least ten times as long for me. I am re-sawing 6”-8” cedar, walnut and maple, mostly.

-- No PHD just a DD214 Website> craftingcouple.com

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

7770 posts in 3060 days


#5 posted 11-02-2016 02:40 PM

I use a Timber Wolf 3/4” x 2/3 VPC (variable positive claw) blade. I used to use their 3/4” x 3tpi blade, HOWEVER once I switched to the 2/3 VPC (variable positive claw) blade I WAS AMAZED. The variable claw pattern cleans out the blade in use and allows for a much cleaner, straighter, and faster cut. No more clogging the blade with sawdust.

That’s my 2-cents worth. And yes I mostly resaw my lumber, up to 11in. thus far on my Rikon 14in. #10-325.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View AHuxley's profile

AHuxley

808 posts in 3468 days


#6 posted 11-02-2016 02:56 PM

Just order the same bladestock as the Woodslicer from Spectrum Supply (Kerfmaster) for half the price.

That said while hardened spring steel blades (like the Woodslicer) are very sharp they dull quickly and unless you have need for their unique characteristics they are a poor value.

In the end bi-metal or carbide tipped blades will be far more cost effective than any of the carbon steel (or high silicon steel) blades. Be careful to not go overboard on width if you gate a bi-metal or carbide blade for the N4400 while it is a very nice saw it still is a realtive lighweight and a 3/4” bi-metal or carbide blade will pretty much max it out if proper 25,000-30,000 psi is used. Carbon, high silicon steel and sring steel blades only need about half that tension.

View mramseyISU's profile

mramseyISU

549 posts in 1692 days


#7 posted 11-02-2016 03:30 PM

I’d suggest the Simmonds Red Streak bands. We used them in our sawmill for years on the band mill for resawing white oak and you can get them for smaller saws too.

-- Trust me I'm an engineer.

View DrTebi's profile

DrTebi

267 posts in 3413 days


#8 posted 11-02-2016 06:36 PM

These are all nice suggestions… but what about delivery times and availability? As I mentioned, the Woodslicer for example is back-ordered for at least two weeks, so that won’t work for me…

I am afraid that this may be the case for many of the other blades as well, since I need a custom length (156 1/2).

Any opinions on:
Starrett Woodpecker Pro
“Diamond Sterling 3/8”x.032x3TPI X-tra Duty Carbon Blade
?

View AHuxley's profile

AHuxley

808 posts in 3468 days


#9 posted 11-02-2016 09:47 PM



These are all nice suggestions… but what about delivery times and availability? As I mentioned, the Woodslicer for example is back-ordered for at least two weeks, so that won t work for me…

I am afraid that this may be the case for many of the other blades as well, since I need a custom length (156 1/2).

Any opinions on:
Starrett Woodpecker Pro
“Diamond Sterling 3/8”x.032x3TPI X-tra Duty Carbon Blade
?

- DrTebi

First, if you are buying pre-cut bands then you are over paying, which is the case with the Woodslicer. If you want the Woodslicer I told you where you can get it for half as much from and industrial supply house that welds their own bands. Availability will be only dependant on if they have the band stock in stock. It is just important to understand the pros and cons of a hardened srping steel blade like this. I have a couple for my smaller saws but only use them when the narrow kerf is needed to save wood. The finish off the saw when sharp will rival the best carbide resaw blades.

You can’t really go wrong with Lenox bands, there enitre line are some of the best in the industry. woodcraftbands along with Spectrum Supply (and many others) carry them. The Diemaster II is a highly regarded bi-metal blade and their Woodmaster CT and Trimaster or two of the best carbide resaw blades you will find, though the Woodmaster CT doesn’t come in a size the N4400 can tension correctly since the smallest is a 1” x .035”.

I personally use a combination of the Laguna Resaw King and both the Lenox Trimaster and Woodmaster CT. The Trimaster and RK will give a better finish off the saw but I need to use the Woodmaster CT when power feeding since the chip load is too high for the RK or Trimaster.

View knotheadswoodshed's profile

knotheadswoodshed

225 posts in 2319 days


#10 posted 11-02-2016 10:25 PM

I used to be a big fan of the woodslicer blades but as noted,they seemed to dull quickly.
I then tried the Spectrum blades but had weld issues.
I tried the new blades from Infinity tool and have not looked back, for me, they work extremely well on my Rikon 14”.
http://www.infinitytools.com/saw-blades-accessories/bandsaw-blades-machines-accessories/band-saw-blades/infinity-rip-bandsaw-blades

-- Randy - "I dont make mistakes, I make design change opportunities" www.knotheadswoodshed.com

View DrTebi's profile

DrTebi

267 posts in 3413 days


#11 posted 11-03-2016 03:20 AM



First, if you are buying pre-cut bands then you are over paying, which is the case with the Woodslicer. If you want the Woodslicer I told you where you can get it for half as much from and industrial supply house that welds their own bands. Availability will be only dependant on if they have the band stock in stock. It is just important to understand the pros and cons of a hardened srping steel blade like this. I have a couple for my smaller saws but only use them when the narrow kerf is needed to save wood. The finish off the saw when sharp will rival the best carbide resaw blades.

You can t really go wrong with Lenox bands, there enitre line are some of the best in the industry. woodcraftbands along with Spectrum Supply (and many others) carry them. The Diemaster II is a highly regarded bi-metal blade and their Woodmaster CT and Trimaster or two of the best carbide resaw blades you will find, though the Woodmaster CT doesn t come in a size the N4400 can tension correctly since the smallest is a 1” x .035”.

I personally use a combination of the Laguna Resaw King and both the Lenox Trimaster and Woodmaster CT. The Trimaster and RK will give a better finish off the saw but I need to use the Woodmaster CT when power feeding since the chip load is too high for the RK or Trimaster.

- AHuxley


Thanks for clearing that up.

The Lenox options look interesting. The Trimaster is not specifically for wood though, so I wonder which blade width/thickness/tpi you would recommend for re-sawing?

View DrTebi's profile

DrTebi

267 posts in 3413 days


#12 posted 11-03-2016 03:22 AM


I used to be a big fan of the woodslicer blades but as noted,they seemed to dull quickly.
I then tried the Spectrum blades but had weld issues.
I tried the new blades from Infinity tool and have not looked back, for me, they work extremely well on my Rikon 14”.
http://www.infinitytools.com/saw-blades-accessories/bandsaw-blades-machines-accessories/band-saw-blades/infinity-rip-bandsaw-blades

- knotheadswoodshed


Thanks for the suggestion, but these blades are not available in 156 3/4” ...

View AHuxley's profile

AHuxley

808 posts in 3468 days


#13 posted 11-03-2016 04:13 AM

First, if you are buying pre-cut bands then you are over paying, which is the case with the Woodslicer. If you want the Woodslicer I told you where you can get it for half as much from and industrial supply house that welds their own bands. Availability will be only dependant on if they have the band stock in stock. It is just important to understand the pros and cons of a hardened srping steel blade like this. I have a couple for my smaller saws but only use them when the narrow kerf is needed to save wood. The finish off the saw when sharp will rival the best carbide resaw blades.

You can t really go wrong with Lenox bands, there enitre line are some of the best in the industry. woodcraftbands along with Spectrum Supply (and many others) carry them. The Diemaster II is a highly regarded bi-metal blade and their Woodmaster CT and Trimaster or two of the best carbide resaw blades you will find, though the Woodmaster CT doesn t come in a size the N4400 can tension correctly since the smallest is a 1” x .035”.

I personally use a combination of the Laguna Resaw King and both the Lenox Trimaster and Woodmaster CT. The Trimaster and RK will give a better finish off the saw but I need to use the Woodmaster CT when power feeding since the chip load is too high for the RK or Trimaster.

- AHuxley

Thanks for clearing that up.

The Lenox options look interesting. The Trimaster is not specifically for wood though, so I wonder which blade width/thickness/tpi you would recommend for re-sawing?

- DrTebi

For the N4400 you want the 3/4” x .035” 3 tpi Of all the carbide resaw blades I have used it has the second best off the saw finish, the Resaw King is the best. But honestly if you hand feed any of the carbide blades are going to be very similar because your hesitation marks will be by far the worst part of the finish.

Honestly, long term the Laguna RK will be the most cost effective (assuming you actually use it a lot) since it is the easiest and cheapest to get resharpened. Very few places resharpen carbide bandsaw blades. Laguna sharpens their own.

View bearkatwood's profile

bearkatwood

1640 posts in 1158 days


#14 posted 11-03-2016 07:45 AM

My first advise would be to stop … STOP! and think about what you nee to do. DO you need to buy a bandsaw(one that is a rip-off of a laguna and maybe worth the money) or do you need to complete a task. In 1856 they did not have a laguna or hammer for that means. I am not trying to dissuade you from your purchase, only to show maybe there is another way. Do you have a table saw? Ripping on the bottom and top of the boards might get you a good start to resawing the piece you need.
I know that I am not answering any of you questions, but there is a solution to completing your woodworking task that doesn’t involve buying a new bandsaw.
All the best on your journey as a woodworker. Laters.

-- Brian Noel

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DrTebi

267 posts in 3413 days


#15 posted 11-03-2016 09:07 AM



My first advise would be to stop … STOP! and think about what you nee to do. DO you need to buy a bandsaw(one that is a rip-off of a laguna and maybe worth the money) or do you need to complete a task. In 1856 they did not have a laguna or hammer for that means. I am not trying to dissuade you from your purchase, only to show maybe there is another way. Do you have a table saw? Ripping on the bottom and top of the boards might get you a good start to resawing the piece you need.
I know that I am not answering any of you questions, but there is a solution to completing your woodworking task that doesn t involve buying a new bandsaw.
All the best on your journey as a woodworker. Laters.

- bearkatwood


I appreciate your concern, and you do make a good point. I have actually held off on buying this particular saw since four years now… instead I just updated my old Shopsmith bandsaw a bit to get by for any simple curved cuts that I needed, or aluminum and brass.

But when I tried re-sawing 6” and 8” wide boards on it, well, they did not fit. Smaller ones do fit, but I just cannot get nice straight cuts. Even if it does go well for a bit, then it chokes when there is not enough power and I am stuck in the middle of the board.

I have ripped boards in half before on the table saw as you describe. It did work fairly well, but it won’t work for a wide board, and I also find it a bit unsafe.

Hence my decision to finally pull the trigger. I am really looking forward to re-sawing some logs, and some other big chunks of wood I had stored for years now. Nothing that would easily be cut on the table saw, nor the Shopsmith bandsaw…

View AHuxley's profile

AHuxley

808 posts in 3468 days


#16 posted 11-03-2016 03:00 PM



My first advise would be to stop … STOP! and think about what you nee to do. DO you need to buy a bandsaw(one that is a rip-off of a laguna and maybe worth the money) or do you need to complete a task.
- bearkatwood

I am curious why you think the Hammer bandsaw are a rip-off of Laguna, considering Laguna has never actually manufactured a bandsaw. Laguna’s saws have been built by Meber (in the past) ACM and and now part of their line in Asia. The Hammer is just a Austrian built saw from worldwide parts (many of which are Asian) that is in the mold of the Euro bandsaw that has been built by ACM, Meber, Centaro and a couple of others over the last few decades. The only issue I can see is the X-Life guides but they have also been used by ACM (who makes the current Italian Laguna saws) so I am not sure how the IP flows on those.

Certainly someone can live without a bandsaw or a table saw or fill in the blank. However, the bandsaw is probably the most versatile machine in a woodshop. Then again I am jaded since I think bandsaws are one of the machines you actually need multiples of in a shop.

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gargey

1013 posts in 922 days


#17 posted 11-03-2016 03:24 PM

BAM!


I am curious why you think the Hammer bandsaw are a rip-off of Laguna, considering Laguna has never actually manufactured a bandsaw. Laguna s saws have been built by Meber (in the past) ACM and and now part of their line in Asia. The Hammer is just a Austrian built saw from worldwide parts (many of which are Asian) that is in the mold of the Euro bandsaw that has been built by ACM, Meber, Centaro and a couple of others over the last few decades. The only issue I can see is the X-Life guides but they have also been used by ACM (who makes the current Italian Laguna saws) so I am not sure how the IP flows on those.
- AHuxley

View johnstoneb's profile

johnstoneb

3014 posts in 2319 days


#18 posted 11-03-2016 03:25 PM

I have had three carbide blades and have not been impressed with there life. The first one I took the tip aff all the teeth shortly after I had it. I was my fault so bought a second Olson blade. This one lasted for awhile eventually the cut quality went down and I found the tips of the teeth broken off thru use. I bought a 3/4” Laguna blade. It resawed several pieces of Walnut and cherry very well. I started to resaw a piece of purpleheart went in about 1/2” and it started to burn the cut. I found the tips of the carbide had all broken iff in the purpleheart. I went into Woodcraft bought a 1/2”Starrett it cuts smooth and straight. I am thru buying the carbide blades. I can buy 5 or 6 of the standard blades for the price of the carbide.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

View AHuxley's profile

AHuxley

808 posts in 3468 days


#19 posted 11-03-2016 04:04 PM



I have had three carbide blades and have not been impressed with there life. The first one I took the tip aff all the teeth shortly after I had it. I was my fault so bought a second Olson blade. This one lasted for awhile eventually the cut quality went down and I found the tips of the teeth broken off thru use. I bought a 3/4” Laguna blade. It resawed several pieces of Walnut and cherry very well. I started to resaw a piece of purpleheart went in about 1/2” and it started to burn the cut. I found the tips of the carbide had all broken iff in the purpleheart. I went into Woodcraft bought a 1/2”Starrett it cuts smooth and straight. I am thru buying the carbide blades. I can buy 5 or 6 of the standard blades for the price of the carbide.

- johnstoneb

A properly used carbide tipped blade will outlast a common carbon blade by 25-30 times if used perperly. Your experiance with carbide blades is not endemic to them. For example there are countless Lenox Woodmaster CTs being used around the world at this very moment in flooring manufacturing cutting for days on end. Not know more information I can’t pinpoint the problem but stripping teeth is something that almost never happens. This happening to all three carbide blades of different types and different manufactures points away from the blades as the cause. The only teeth I have stripped in the over 20 years of using carbide tipped blades were from hitting a large piece of gravel in veneer blank on a saw running 8400sfpm being power fed at 20fpm, if I had been hand feeding it likely would not have been such a disaster.

Out of curiosity what saw and what tension were you running?

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thecarpenterisking

18 posts in 732 days


#20 posted 11-03-2016 04:08 PM

DrTepi,
I agree with Bondo Gaposis. Suffolk Machinery (Timber Wolf) makes the best blades. They custom weld them to order and ship out the next day. They are in NY and I in California and I received them in 3 days. They have great customer service and if you call them and let them know what it is your looking to cut, they will give you the options you have and make recommendations. This is a great company who makes a quality product.

-- Whatever you do, work heartily, as for the Lord and not for men!

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

3341 posts in 1944 days


#21 posted 11-03-2016 04:36 PM


Just order the same bladestock as the Woodslicer from Spectrum Supply (Kerfmaster) for half the price.

- AHuxley

I just checked on the Kerfmaster blade from Spectrum. They do have great prices. When I got to shipping, I had a choice of $23 for USPS or $30 from UPS ground, although they said these were only estimates. What’s your experience with their shipping charges?

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View AHuxley's profile

AHuxley

808 posts in 3468 days


#22 posted 11-03-2016 05:17 PM


Just order the same bladestock as the Woodslicer from Spectrum Supply (Kerfmaster) for half the price.

- AHuxley

I just checked on the Kerfmaster blade from Spectrum. They do have great prices. When I got to shipping, I had a choice of $23 for USPS or $30 from UPS ground, although they said these were only estimates. What s your experience with their shipping charges?

- CharlesA

I always buy 10-12 blades at a time and the shipping is always high when calculated. I aways call them and work out the shipping. While their shipping is not like an average e-tailer (they are an industrial supply house) it always seems to work out as savings for me, I just looked and my last 11 blades were shipped for 27.81. But shipping is a potential factor which I suppose I should mention. The best buy for the Kerfmaster is the sample 4 pack which gets the price down even more, they used to offer free shipping on those but I don;t think they do any more. Even if you pay the full amount for shipping buying a 4 back (for a smaller hobby saw) will be under $20 a blade vs Highland for 4 would be about $33 bucks a blade.

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

3341 posts in 1944 days


#23 posted 11-03-2016 05:20 PM



I always buy 10-12 blades at a time and the shipping is always high when calculated.

- AHuxley

Thanks. I clearly resaw a lot less than you. That’s a decade long supply for me.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View AHuxley's profile

AHuxley

808 posts in 3468 days


#24 posted 11-03-2016 06:12 PM


I always buy 10-12 blades at a time and the shipping is always high when calculated.

- AHuxley

Thanks. I clearly resaw a lot less than you. That s a decade long supply for me.

- CharlesA

I often toss a Kerfmaster after slicing a single flitch into veneer. If it is worth cutting for veneer and is wide (14-18” or so) and relatively hard wood the blade isn;t going to be near razor sharp like they come when I am finished. However, the thin kerf and lack of set usually gains me between 2 and 4 sheets which on a wide long board can be 24-48 extra sqaure feet of veener worth well over the price of a cheap blade.

These spring steel blades are IMO a very niche product and primarily should be used for cuts where the thin kerf and fine finish are cost effective OR on smaller saws (like 14” cast Delta’s and the clones) where tensionning wider or thicker blades is beyond the saws ability. For general resawing and veneer slicing bi-metal and carbide blade will be far more cost effective as long as the saw can provide the 25,000 to 30,000 psi they need to perform well.

View DrTebi's profile

DrTebi

267 posts in 3413 days


#25 posted 11-04-2016 07:51 AM

Well, I found the reviews and comments on the Diamond Sterling blades convincing, and ordered two of their blades through Hal Taylor:

1/4”x.032”x4TPI Xtra Duty Band Saw Blade
1/2”x.032”x3TPI X-tra Duty Band Saw Blade

I will report back once I got the saw set up and made some cuts ☺.

Thanks for all your replies.

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

1410 posts in 721 days


#26 posted 11-04-2016 11:52 AM

My thought is resaw, or for close curve cutting the blade you spend money on should never come to you on a cardboard card, with stretch plastic holding it on. So my advice is never buy from many of the sellers frequently suggested. I think you need to contact a place that makes your blades to order, with allowance for thickness of blade stock, with a variety of tooth sets, spacing, and even gullet depth, and tooth projection. As to width of blade you want close to the max width a blade will fit across the BEARING surface of your saws wheels. IOW it can be too narrow for your saw, your penalty there is very slow cutting, blade breakage. Too wide and the blade will lap over the edges of the wheel and you will get drift/poor cuts. Just right and you will track perfectly, and have enough backbone to cut faster. Now that all sounds straight forward, yep, except the wheels vary from domed, to flat topped, and a few are depressed in the center so the blade actually curls up on both edges. Then add another thought, if your tooth count allows for clearance of all the wood that has been already cut. Case in point, the prepackaged special is 3/4” wide, with 3 teeth per inch. On a resaw of 10 to 14” tall that saw is cutting a lot of wood dust, that refuses to leave the cut because you have not near enough gullets/gullet depth to carry away the dust from where you have already cut. This creates a lot of heat, heat kills cutting edges, distorts thinner metals, and so you will have blades you need to frequently replace, that make a wiggly cut. For taller resaws you need something in a 1.3 tooth per inch tooth count. Material, is a book of it’s own, do you “need” carbide, likely not if you are a hobbyist.

I like http://www.toolcenter.com/index.php?p=home guys there are a lot of similar companies on the net, you can price shop. You dictated you didn’t want to wait a week, so that alone will eliminate you from getting the best blades. It’s companies with pre-made stuff you want to avoid, as it robs you of the critical choices, but the pre-made is ready to ship…..........Oh you want it express well we’ll just add 34% and it’s on your doorstep tomorrow…........ That is fast shipment, but not a good blade. As with all things in life, your choice.

-- Think safe, be safe

View Woodbum's profile

Woodbum

828 posts in 3212 days


#27 posted 11-04-2016 11:58 AM

I had always used the Woodslicer from Highland Woodworking until recently. I just have a Jet 14” saw, so it is a lot different from your Hammer. I tried a Timberwolf 1/2” 3 TPI blade from Woodcraft and it re-sawed every bit as good or better as the Woodslicer for less $$$. Try one, it is a WHOLE lot cheaper than the Lennox just to try out. Good luck, work safely and have fun!

-- "Now I'm just another old guy wearing funny clothes"

View AHuxley's profile

AHuxley

808 posts in 3468 days


#28 posted 11-04-2016 03:28 PM



I had always used the Woodslicer from Highland Woodworking until recently. I just have a Jet 14” saw, so it is a lot different from your Hammer. I tried a Timberwolf 1/2” 3 TPI blade from Woodcraft and it re-sawed every bit as good or better as the Woodslicer for less $$$. Try one, it is a WHOLE lot cheaper than the Lennox just to try out. Good luck, work safely and have fun!

- Woodbum

If a Timberwolf from Woodcraft is more expensive than a similar Lenox you are buying Lenox blades from the wrong place…

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

1410 posts in 721 days


#29 posted 11-05-2016 03:50 AM

Well saying “Lennox” is covering a lot of different blade material, if a Carbide was priced against a HSS blade there would be miles of difference in price, but you have apples, and Mercedes as a comparison, just saying.

-- Think safe, be safe

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