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All Replies on How would you gang cut these pickets?

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View John's profile

How would you gang cut these pickets?

by John
posted 1871 days ago


43 replies so far

View Rustic's profile

Rustic

3126 posts in 2192 days


#1 posted 1871 days ago

you could cut them on a bandsaw. Your best bet is to do what you feel comfortable.

-- www.carvingandturningsbyrick.com, Rick Kruse, Grand Rapids, MI

View ellen35's profile

ellen35

2556 posts in 2029 days


#2 posted 1871 days ago

I would cut a single point on a miter saw, then cut the v groove with either a band saw or saber saw with a jig…you make the jig.

-- "Don't let the perfect be the enemy of the good." Voltaire

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

5376 posts in 2025 days


#3 posted 1871 days ago

I’d probably cut single pickets from 1X3s and hold two together with the horizontal rails. That appears to be how they were done in the link/picture you provided.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View kerflesss's profile

kerflesss

182 posts in 1964 days


#4 posted 1871 days ago

I’m with Gene, 1×3’s and do your points on the miter saw.

View John's profile

John

341 posts in 2394 days


#5 posted 1871 days ago

Thanks for your replies so far – I keep picturing lining them all up and cutting the valley along the top with a circular saw, then I can get large batches at one, and I can follow up with the miter saw to quickly clip the corners.

Ellen I like the sabersaw/jig idea, might be a good excuse to finally get a good saber :-)

Gene they are single boards, the one on the right in the pic is slightly split which makes it look like two. I want single boards. There are several fences just like this in Colonial Williamsburg, and while they may not be the most practical, I want an authentic look (i.e. it’s what the wife wants!)

-- John - Central PA - http://affyx.wordpress.com

View Julian's profile

Julian

880 posts in 2122 days


#6 posted 1871 days ago

I’d just use a jigsaw and be done with it. A decent jigsaw like a bosch or dewalt with a good blade will cut those very easily.

-- Julian, Park Forest, IL

View patron's profile

patron

12955 posts in 1937 days


#7 posted 1871 days ago

yes to the above ,
or you could make a jig for the router and use a spiral cutter and bushing to follow it,
any way you decide , it is patience and repetition .

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View lew's profile

lew

9937 posts in 2351 days


#8 posted 1871 days ago

Definitely the jig saw.

Why?- every project requires a new tool purchase. This is Woodworkers Unwritten Rule #2!

It would probably be the fastest method, also

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View John's profile

John

341 posts in 2394 days


#9 posted 1871 days ago

Thanks again – keep ‘em coming!

I’m putting my money where my mouth is on this question – offering a ONE DOLLAR reward on tweetbrain! https://tweetbrain.com/answers/to/218340—so post your answers there too please!

-- John - Central PA - http://affyx.wordpress.com

View HokieMojo's profile

HokieMojo

2097 posts in 2324 days


#10 posted 1871 days ago

why not tilt your tablesaw blade to 45 degrees and clamp a few of these boards (however many you can comforatbly support) and slide them accross the blad with a mitreing jig. Flip and repeat. Then you’ve got a whole bunch done quickly and in an easy to repeat fashion? not sure if you have a crosscut sled or tablesaw capable of handling the length of the stock though.

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HokieMojo

2097 posts in 2324 days


#11 posted 1871 days ago

oops, bently beat me to it

View stefang's profile

stefang

12540 posts in 1930 days


#12 posted 1870 days ago

I like a tablesaw solution best providing you can stand them vertical. I would clamp a bunch together. Two of the angles are the same from each edge. You can register the first edge against a spacer when you do the first cut, then remove the spacer and run it through again registering the same edge to cut the 2nd angled in the same direction. Then register the other edge again with the spacer inserted and do the same procedure again. Of course the blade will be set at 45 degrees.

Hope this is a little clearer than mud. Don’t hesitate to ask for clarification if your interested in this method. This is the same solution as bently but with the addition of the spacer.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View ellen35's profile

ellen35

2556 posts in 2029 days


#13 posted 1870 days ago

Can you really stand a 40” picket vertically on a table saw…and do it safely??
I’m curious!
Ellen

-- "Don't let the perfect be the enemy of the good." Voltaire

View HokieMojo's profile

HokieMojo

2097 posts in 2324 days


#14 posted 1870 days ago

i assume when people say vertically, they mean:
not on its face, but up on its edge

I could be wrong, but thats what I was trying to suggest.

View stefang's profile

stefang

12540 posts in 1930 days


#15 posted 1870 days ago

Don’t see why not Ellen. A bunch clamped together should be plenty stable. The pickets would have their top edge on the table with the width of the picket 90 degrees to the fence. I would make some trial cuts first to ensure accuracy, but once set up it should go great. you might want a scrap piece on the back to prevent tear out on the last piece.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View Joe Lyddon's profile (online now)

Joe Lyddon

7618 posts in 2648 days


#16 posted 1870 days ago

1×3 method…

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14584 posts in 2272 days


#17 posted 1870 days ago

I’d do it with my circular saw.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Kindlingmaker's profile

Kindlingmaker

2654 posts in 2123 days


#18 posted 1870 days ago

You know if you do the cutting outside and as people walk past you might be able to get them to do it because its soooo much fun and maybe even get a frog, kite and broken jack knife…

All kidding aside, The clamping many together and using your table saw would be the quickest if you are safe. All clamped up your might be able to do 25 or more at once… Be safe though.

-- Never board, always knotty, lots of growth rings

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14584 posts in 2272 days


#19 posted 1870 days ago

You could line up a lot more than 25 and do it with a circular saw a lot safer than holding them up above a table saw IMO.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View SCOTSMAN's profile

SCOTSMAN

5241 posts in 2181 days


#20 posted 1870 days ago

I’d do them one at a time I think thats the only way to get good or perfect results possibly with a Handsaw boring answer sorry but how big can one fence be ? So it might take a while how long does the fence need to last? If you get inconsistant results it will look dreadful . When you have so many side by side any small flaw will be instantly recognisable .Alistair

-- excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

View Joe Lyddon's profile (online now)

Joe Lyddon

7618 posts in 2648 days


#21 posted 1870 days ago

Make a little jig for the angle cut, use the band saw fence, & cut, flip, & cut on a band saw… (all 1×3’s)
then glue’em together…

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14584 posts in 2272 days


#22 posted 1870 days ago

If the cuts were to be at a 45, they would only be about 2” deep. The hypotenuse is slightly less than 3”. Even so, a 7” circular saw will not cut any near that. a 10” Table saw should come close.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14584 posts in 2272 days


#23 posted 1870 days ago

Rethinkning this, I think I’d set up a jig on the band saw. Like it has been said, more precision and if they are off, it will be very distracting, especially 2 on the same picket.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View mtnwild's profile

mtnwild

3474 posts in 2123 days


#24 posted 1870 days ago

How about a jig for a jigsaw, and slam them in the field while you put them up. Less handling and it should not take too long to cut each board as you go down the line.

-- mtnwild (Jack), It's not what you see, it's how you see it.

View John Ormsby's profile

John Ormsby

1276 posts in 2333 days


#25 posted 1870 days ago

make a jig /guide for the bandsaw and gang clamp a bunch at a time. You will be done in no time.

-- Oldworld, Fair Oaks, Ca

View kolwdwrkr's profile

kolwdwrkr

2821 posts in 2186 days


#26 posted 1870 days ago

Are we sure that the boards in the picture are actually 1 board with a “V” cut into it? The one on the right looks like it is seperating as if it were 2 boards.
If not you can set up your miter gauge on the table saw (a slider is prefered that can have a stop) with a sacrificial fence so you can clamp a stop at your length. The boards would be layed up on the saw on edge (length wise horizontal, NOT vertical) and the blade would be tilted to a 45 degree and raised as high as needed to cut to center ~ 2 1/8. You should be able to run the piece through, back up, flip the piece and then run it through again.

-- ~ Inspiring those who inspire me ~

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14584 posts in 2272 days


#27 posted 1870 days ago

I was just thinkning they should be be a compound miter cut to cause water to drain out of the “V”. If moisture collects it will cause rot.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Broda's profile

Broda

313 posts in 2115 days


#28 posted 1870 days ago

TopamaxSurvivor has a good point about the compound mitre cuts.

I personally would just get two “normal” one pointed pickets and maybe biscuit join them together

-- BRODY. NSW AUSTRALIA -arguments with turnings are rarely productive-

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

2363 posts in 2034 days


#29 posted 1870 days ago

I’d build a long rectangular frame with 2×4’s maybe 4-5 feet long, slide a bunch of them vertically into the frame, put a wedge in the end of the frame to bind them in. then I’d use my circular saw, with my edge guide against the outside of the frame, and the blade at a 45 to cut all angles. You’d be able to do dozens of them at a time.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View John's profile

John

341 posts in 2394 days


#30 posted 1870 days ago

Wow lots of great ideas thanks!

Some thoughts so far…

gang cutting on a table saw would be great, but holding the boards perpendicular to the saw table seems unsafe

BentlyJ’s idea to cut them horizontally on the table saw might work (see pics)
picket math
pickets on saw

1×3’s are not an option for my project but I appreciate the suggestions

to cut them on the bandsaw would require a jig but my bandsaw table might be too small

jigsaw might be very time consuming, and mine is a hunk-o-junk

I think tablesaw method and circular saw method are in the lead right now.

By the way, I’m making these this weekend – what a great group dynamic to bring all these minds together on my little issue – thanks all!

Keep ‘em comin!

-- John - Central PA - http://affyx.wordpress.com

View CutNRun's profile

CutNRun

122 posts in 2442 days


#31 posted 1870 days ago

If one is available, I think a radial arm saw may be the easiest and perhaps safest way to cut multiple slats at a time.

My “sketch-up” program involve graphite.

-- CutNRun - So much wood, so many trails, so little time

View Joe Lyddon's profile (online now)

Joe Lyddon

7618 posts in 2648 days


#32 posted 1869 days ago

... use a band saw & get it over with…

... stacked or not stacked… any way you want to do it…

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14584 posts in 2272 days


#33 posted 1869 days ago

You can make your band saw table bigger when you build the jig on a piece of plywood.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View kolwdwrkr's profile

kolwdwrkr

2821 posts in 2186 days


#34 posted 1869 days ago

You’re not setting the blade to more then 2 1/8” at a 45 degree if you do it my way. When I get back today I am going to make a small video of what I am actually talking about. I’m a happy helperton. Who knows, I may actually make myself out to be an idiot and learn something new in the process. LOL.

-- ~ Inspiring those who inspire me ~

View Karson's profile

Karson

34852 posts in 2997 days


#35 posted 1869 days ago

I go the table saw way with the slats on their side. two saw setups, and 4 cuts, flipping the slate after the first cut. A nice high fence on your miter gauge of sliding table would keep them stable to run through the blade. I would also suggest a bandsaw but a 40” slat with most of it off the table could be unstable in my mind.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

View kolwdwrkr's profile

kolwdwrkr

2821 posts in 2186 days


#36 posted 1868 days ago

I was wrong and accept my status as an idiot. LOL. I drew it on paper while sitting here the other day and didn’t do my figuring right. The blade would have to be raised up more then 3” (more like 4 1/4) so there will be no video to show me being a jack ass. Standing the boards on end would be about the only way to cut them on the table saw. You could clamp quite a few of them together and run them along the fence. You could make a tall “tenoning” jig that could be built to slide along your fence. You could clamp your slats to that and just push the entire setup to make the cut.
A radial arm saw would work wonders. I think if you don’t want to set up the table saw and you don’t have a RAS then a bandsaw would work. You could also just cut them individually with a jig saw, but time is money.

-- ~ Inspiring those who inspire me ~

View stefang's profile

stefang

12540 posts in 1930 days


#37 posted 1865 days ago

The tablesaw method is best because you can do it with only one set-up. This will greatly reduce the chance of error and give better more consistent results. I’m sure there are plenty of ways to do this, but why make it complicated? If you are worried about stability with the pickets standing on end, then you can clamp a guide rail on the other side of the clamped multiples to keep everything well aligned.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View John's profile

John

341 posts in 2394 days


#38 posted 1863 days ago

Well I went with the table saw horizontal method but the boards were too heavy and wet to gang cut – had to make them one a t a time (only did 18 for the first part of the fence, a small hide-a-fence for the trashcans, the rest of the fence might just be single points)

Turns out my 10” saw all the way up and at 45 degrees is exactly 2.5” above the table, so 5” boards worked perfectly.

Pic one is before and after

two is ripping 3/8” off each side of a 5/4×6 x 10 to remove the roundover and size them down to 5”

three is the first valley cut

four is the hide-a-fence

Thanks again everyone for your suggestions!

-- John - Central PA - http://affyx.wordpress.com

View Joe Lyddon's profile (online now)

Joe Lyddon

7618 posts in 2648 days


#39 posted 1863 days ago

Your Valley Cut doesn’t make sense to me…
Your finished fence, to me, does not even use the results of your Valley cut… A 45* Horiz. cut?! Not Vertical?

A pic of cutting the Peaks would be nice… did you cut 1 at a time, etc.?

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

View kolwdwrkr's profile

kolwdwrkr

2821 posts in 2186 days


#40 posted 1863 days ago

When in doubt cut an inch off! LOL. Good solution. I knew my method was a good idea ;^)

-- ~ Inspiring those who inspire me ~

View Paul's profile

Paul

340 posts in 2186 days


#41 posted 1863 days ago

I was going to suggest a chain saw, maybe you were right to go the way you did.

-- If you say 'It's good enough', it probably isn't.

View John's profile

John

341 posts in 2394 days


#42 posted 1863 days ago

Joe, it’s hard to tell from the crappy pic I took, but pic 3 shows a single board on it edge… maybe “valley cut” is the wrong term…. pic one shows the results.

Thanks KOL!

Paul, a chainsaw is never the wrong answer! :-)

-- John - Central PA - http://affyx.wordpress.com

View stefang's profile

stefang

12540 posts in 1930 days


#43 posted 1863 days ago

well, I guess now we will never know how well all the untried methods would have worked. Maybe that’s for the best.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

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