LumberJocks

All Replies on Help needed to make pattern for Intarsia

  • Advertise with us
View Allison's profile

Help needed to make pattern for Intarsia

by Allison
posted 02-13-2009 06:43 AM


23 replies so far

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile (online now)

TopamaxSurvivor

14750 posts in 2330 days


#1 posted 02-13-2009 07:24 AM

If I undersatand your problem correctly, laying it on a copy machince should get you a detailed picture. I have done this in the past with various objects. All the area not covered by the reflective cover come out black; so, laying a white paper over your objects should help with the quality a little. You may have to do this several times to get the entire pattern depending on the size of the original. Once you have the parts, you can adjust the size with a copy machine too. Hope this helps. good luck :-))

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile (online now)

TopamaxSurvivor

14750 posts in 2330 days


#2 posted 02-13-2009 09:04 AM

Hi Again Allison, I just happened to think about smoking the origianl piece. Use a candle to put soot all over the piece being careful not to burn it of course. After you get a good coat of soot on it, lay a paper on it to pickup the pattern being careful not to smear things around. That should do it if you can smoke it without damaging the original. I have used inletting black to find the high spots inletting stocks, but I think it would probably be too hard to clean off. You could maybe make some with charcoal?? Good Luck :=)) PS, put something down to catch the wax from the candle,, they burn fast when held sideways to smoke an item.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View robbi's profile

robbi

176 posts in 2610 days


#3 posted 02-13-2009 09:17 AM

Hey Allison,
I’m not sure exactly what detail you are looking for-I know nothing about intarsia but if you are trying for the detail on the faces and clothes and all that, how about chaulk? It’s kind of the same idea as crayons but sometimes it works better. There’s my 2 cents….I’m sure you will think of something, you do beautiful work!

-- robbi-Yadahooty!

View GFYS's profile

GFYS

711 posts in 2126 days


#4 posted 02-13-2009 09:50 AM

One could possibly import the photo into a cad program and trace it to a certain scale and print it with a grid. Do you want it 23×18?

View Allison's profile

Allison

819 posts in 2453 days


#5 posted 02-13-2009 10:17 AM

Yes I would like it the dimensions it is!

-- Allison, Northeastern Ca. Remember, Amateurs built the Ark. Professionals built the Titanic!

View Scott Michael's profile

Scott Michael

68 posts in 2051 days


#6 posted 02-13-2009 12:26 PM

Hi Allison. I do a lot of design work w/Photoshop. I’ll gladly copy the pic and see if I can print it out simply as a B&W line art picture. If I can do this, the pattern is pretty much done…......then it’s up to you to choose the wood types. All you would have to do is use the original picture as a guide to bring the 3-d look into the final project. I’ll keep you posted.

-- scmichael

View interpim's profile

interpim

1132 posts in 2113 days


#7 posted 02-13-2009 03:32 PM

You ever consider free handing using the grid method?

Take a photo of your original, second from bottom should work… draw a evenly spaced grid in it.
Draw another grid on your paper, you can increase the size on your paper. And start drawing each square individually. Once your done with all the squares, you will have a fairly accurate rendition.

Or, you could go to blockposters and make a large scale one after you get it digitally changed to black and white.

-- San Diego, CA

View Harv's profile

Harv

31 posts in 2048 days


#8 posted 02-13-2009 03:38 PM

Hi Allison

I can appreciate the problem you are having. My problem is that I can not draw a straight line with a ruler! My only suggestion is that if you can not figure out something yourself, you can have one of the fine Intarsia artists that are online draw it out for you. Im afraid I am doomed to create pieces from other artists. You do great work and Im sure you will come up with something you are happy with.
Harv

View Douglas Bordner's profile

Douglas Bordner

3964 posts in 2718 days


#9 posted 02-13-2009 07:27 PM

Photobucket

I saved you an 18x24 pdf document that you can print out at FedEx Office (formerly Kinko’s) on the architectural plotter, or they can scale the document to what ever standard paper size you are looking for.
Sorry, Ally, you’ll still have to draw in the individual pieces-but it’s a start.

-- "Bordnerizing" perfectly good lumber for over a decade.

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile (online now)

TopamaxSurvivor

14750 posts in 2330 days


#10 posted 02-13-2009 07:35 PM

Hmm! That is interesting. How hard was it to get from the photo to pdf?

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View GFYS's profile

GFYS

711 posts in 2126 days


#11 posted 02-13-2009 07:39 PM

heh, you have more help than you need.

View Douglas Bordner's profile

Douglas Bordner

3964 posts in 2718 days


#12 posted 02-13-2009 08:48 PM

Photoshop:
Image>Adjust> Levels
Image>Adjust> Brightness Contrast
(knocks out the background)
Filter>Stylize>Find Edges
Image>Adjust> Levels
Image>Adjust> Brightness Contrast
Image>Mode>Bitmap>50% Threshold.

Illustrator:
File>Place object>Save Photoshop file as object
Object>Live Trace>Tracing Options>Black and White> Levels 157>Ignore white
File>Document settings>18×24 Landscape
Constrained Enlargement (Drag from corner with Shift Alt keys down.)
File>Save As: PDF

Voilá!

-- "Bordnerizing" perfectly good lumber for over a decade.

View Allison's profile

Allison

819 posts in 2453 days


#13 posted 02-13-2009 10:46 PM

Wow Thank you!!!!!

-- Allison, Northeastern Ca. Remember, Amateurs built the Ark. Professionals built the Titanic!

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile (online now)

TopamaxSurvivor

14750 posts in 2330 days


#14 posted 02-13-2009 11:49 PM

Thanks for the reply Doug. Sounds easy enough in Photoshop :=))

Allison, just being curious, may I ask what this outline drawing gives you that yours didn’t have other than the hat, arms and jaw lines?

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Douglas Bordner's profile

Douglas Bordner

3964 posts in 2718 days


#15 posted 02-14-2009 08:46 AM

Photobucket

I choked the black back some more so it would be easier to pencil in individual pieces of wood. A full scale pdf is here.

At one point in this, TopamaxSurvivor, I thought the same thing. She already has a fine line contour of the outside shape. I’ve never done intarsia, but at minimum with the pdf you can print as many first generation, full scale digital prints as you want. With a little effort you could print in tiles at scale to have something to paste to the wood you’ll cut out. Or you could print a full scale print, pen in details and make copies (or a scan) of that.
With enough fiddling around you wouldn’t be cutting wood ‘til next November :^}
Anyway, I had fun on the a snowy indoors day even if it was a boondoggle.

-- "Bordnerizing" perfectly good lumber for over a decade.

View Grumpy's profile

Grumpy

19460 posts in 2506 days


#16 posted 02-15-2009 12:44 AM

Douglas, you are a hero.

-- Grumpy - "Always look on the bright side of life"- Monty Python

View Chris Wright's profile

Chris Wright

529 posts in 2136 days


#17 posted 02-18-2009 07:49 PM

I don’t know anything about how this type of work is done, but can you not just work off the original? Have it sitting next to you and just copy where the carvings need to go? And if you can’t then I’d just take lots and lots of photos from every angle you can think of and have those on file with lots of notes and measurements. I think that’s how I’d do something like this, but then like I said, I don’t know much about how this type of artwork goes together. Good luck and I hope this helps.

Chris

-- "At its best, life is completely unpredictable." - Christopher Walken

View Kindlingmaker's profile

Kindlingmaker

2654 posts in 2181 days


#18 posted 02-18-2009 07:55 PM

...then there is the old way of talking a slide film picture of it and attaching a large piece of paper to a wall then using a projector to trace it.

-- Never board, always knotty, lots of growth rings

View Kindlingmaker's profile

Kindlingmaker

2654 posts in 2181 days


#19 posted 02-18-2009 07:56 PM

...OH! using new newspaper set the items on it in the sun for a few hours and the newspaper turns yellow and that which is covered by your item remains white.

-- Never board, always knotty, lots of growth rings

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

18615 posts in 2815 days


#20 posted 02-24-2009 01:33 AM

great “how to”

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)

View davidc's profile

davidc

43 posts in 1963 days


#21 posted 11-17-2011 05:47 AM

You have yourself a pretty elaborate project. If I would be tackling it, I would start out by taking a one level or just a front view of it. Then I would open it up in photoshop program on the computer. In the process of taking the picture it is important that you have good lighting, so every detail shows up. Now that you have the picture in front of you, open up a new layer, (I would call this layer new pattern) Then with the poly laso tool start copying the lines to make a selection. You have to hook up the selection so that it will come together as a blinking object. you then do a Stroke (under the edit section). next step is to Deselect what you have stroked an use the erasor tool to erase the unwanted lines. You will have to repeat this process over and over until you have it all copied. Because you opened the picture and made the new layer you will always have a tracing top work with. Of course there are other ways to do it but like I say I would do it this way. Dave

View Byron's profile

Byron

92 posts in 1035 days


#22 posted 11-20-2011 09:38 AM

For the future you could shine a light onto it and trace its shadow, but photoshop is probably the best bet, or post it on here and hope someone awesome can do it for you!

-- Byron Conn, Woodworking/Furniture Design at Rochester Institute of Technology, http://byronconn.com

View davidc's profile

davidc

43 posts in 1963 days


#23 posted 11-20-2011 08:52 PM

Allison, I guess I have to go along with Doug Borden on using Kinko’s (or whatever it’s called now) to blow up the picture you took of it to get the right size. You now have a copy that’s perfect in all detail. If you have difficulty with photoshop you might try this.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase