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View Matt Schnurbusch's profile

Buying the G0555 and I have a question

by Matt Schnurbusch
posted 2107 days ago


28 replies so far

View Scott Bryan's profile

Scott Bryan

27251 posts in 2323 days


#1 posted 2107 days ago

Matt,

If it were me I would go ahead and get the riser block.

As far as planing thin stock one trick that you can use is to glue two boards of equal size together. Put the glue only on in a a 1” wide band on the back edge of the boards. Clamp the glued edge and when the glue is dried put the boards through the planer. Take light passes (1/32” or less) on both sides until you have reached 2x the thickness that you want. Saw the glued edge off the two boards and you have two boards that are planed to a thickness less than your planer is supposedly capable of doing. But I would not recommend doing this for veneers. They are just too thin.

-- Challenges are what make life interesting; overcoming them is what makes life meaningful- Joshua Marine

View Russel's profile

Russel

2199 posts in 2440 days


#2 posted 2107 days ago

I just bought the Grizzly G0555 with the riser block and wheeled base. You can probably make a wheeled base better and cheaper than what they’ve got, but I figured eventually I’ll want the riser, so I got it all at once.

As for veneers, a lot would depend on how thick you slice them. There is the possibility that you could run your work through the planer after you’ve attached it to the substrate, if they’re thick enough. Or you could build a sled for your veneers and use double stick tape.

-- Working at Woodworking http://www.VillageLaneFurniture.com

View Iffy's profile

Iffy

26 posts in 2427 days


#3 posted 2107 days ago

I just got the G0555X and I got the riser block at the same time. You’re already doing some assembly when you get it (the table, fence, etc.) so it was a good time to just do the riser block before you got too far. Then you don’t have to take the thing apart later.

View ChicoWoodnut's profile

ChicoWoodnut

904 posts in 2316 days


#4 posted 2107 days ago

I say go for the riser. You won’t be sorry and like Iffy says, taking the saw apart later is a real PITA. Don’t let the 6” jointer stop you from making wider re-sawn panels. There are ways to use the planer to flatten wider boards.

-- Scott - Chico California http://chicowoodnut.home.comcast.net

View Matt Schnurbusch's profile

Matt Schnurbusch

36 posts in 2114 days


#5 posted 2106 days ago

Pretty much looks like the concensus is to get the riser. I would have thought there would have been at least an opinion or two that better blades would have been the way to go.

Thanks for your inputs folks… Looks like I’ll go for the riser.

Matt

-- - If you can't have fun doin' it, it aint worth doin' - Matt

View brunob's profile

brunob

2275 posts in 2670 days


#6 posted 2106 days ago

I bought one a year ago with the riser. I’m glad I did. A drum sander would sand the veneer, but since you don’t have one, the method Scott suggests will work.

-- Bruce from Central New York...now, if you'll pardon me, I have some sawdust to make.

View rikkor's profile

rikkor

11295 posts in 2376 days


#7 posted 2106 days ago

Get the riser at the beginning. Assembly is more pleasant when the saw is (relatively) clean.

View GaryK's profile

GaryK

10262 posts in 2489 days


#8 posted 2106 days ago

Get the riser first thing. That way you will have all the capibility, plus you won’tget stuck with a bunch small blades when you did get it.

You will find all kinds of uses for the extra 6” even without cutting vener. Make a drum sander your next purchase and you will have a great team of tools.

-- Gary - Never pass up the opportunity to make a mistake look like you planned it that way - Tyler, TX

View Matt Schnurbusch's profile

Matt Schnurbusch

36 posts in 2114 days


#9 posted 2104 days ago

So I was just about to buy my saw with riser, and thought gee I have no idea what blades to get with it. I’m going to search around the forum a little, but does anyone have a recomendation on 105” blades from Grizzly? Or should I get them elsewhere?

Matt

-- - If you can't have fun doin' it, it aint worth doin' - Matt

View GaryK's profile

GaryK

10262 posts in 2489 days


#10 posted 2104 days ago

I have used a 105” Woodslicer from highland hardware for years. Works great. I have never heard any complaints about them.

http://www.highlandwoodworking.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWPROD&ProdID=1293

-- Gary - Never pass up the opportunity to make a mistake look like you planned it that way - Tyler, TX

View John's profile

John

340 posts in 2299 days


#11 posted 2104 days ago

I have the G0555 and love it, I don’t have the riser block but I’m sure I will miss that someday. If I did it over I would go for the G0555X for the extra HP although I’ve never bogged mine, again I could foresee needing the power in the future. Don’t buy Grizzly blades, the blade that comes with the saw is worthless. I went to Woodcraft and found nice ones in 1/4” 1/2” and 3/4” and they meet all my current needs.

-- John - Central PA - http://affyx.wordpress.com

View Matt Schnurbusch's profile

Matt Schnurbusch

36 posts in 2114 days


#12 posted 2104 days ago

I guess I misphrased my question…

In 1/4, 1/2, 3/4” are there any particular TPIs that I should get. I’ve never owned a band saw and have no idea what blades will do what for me. I imagine I will either be getting Timberwolf, or Woodslicers in various sizes, I just don’t want to buy blades I don’t need or won’t use.

Thanks to everyone for the help. This place is incredible.

Matt

-- - If you can't have fun doin' it, it aint worth doin' - Matt

View tenontim's profile

tenontim

2131 posts in 2245 days


#13 posted 2104 days ago

Matt, if you’re going to be doing a lot of resawing, you want the least amount of teeth on the blade, so get like a 3 tpi blade. Too many teeth on the blade will clog up when resawing and cause blade wandering and overheating problems. I use 3 or 4 tooth blades for everything. You really can’t tell much difference in the finish of the cut, if you’re using good blades. I wouldn’t recommend a 3/4” blade for a 14” band saw. Too much stress on the saw frame.

-- Tim

View Matt Schnurbusch's profile

Matt Schnurbusch

36 posts in 2114 days


#14 posted 2104 days ago

Along with the wood specific blades, is there a bood quality bimetal blade that I should get. I imagine my brother will make use of the band saw as well, but he will work mostly with metal.

Sorry, I have a ton of questions. Kind of a refelection of my ignorance.

Matt

-- - If you can't have fun doin' it, it aint worth doin' - Matt

View GaryK's profile

GaryK

10262 posts in 2489 days


#15 posted 2104 days ago

The woodslicer blade I mentioned has a variable tooth spacing from 3 to 4 teeth per inch.
This will reduce vibration a lot and give you a smoother cut.

For resawing I use a 3/4” blade on my bandsaw that has a feature to remove the tension by moving a lever after I am done using it.

I use a 1/2” blade on my saw that does not have that feature.

Your saw will run too fast to cut anything other than aluminuim or brass. Don’t go cutting any ferrous metals
with it.

-- Gary - Never pass up the opportunity to make a mistake look like you planned it that way - Tyler, TX

View Matt Schnurbusch's profile

Matt Schnurbusch

36 posts in 2114 days


#16 posted 2104 days ago

Gary,

i’m glad you brought that up, it never would have occured to me, until I destroyed a blade. Is it possible to get a speed controll to lower the RPMs? This may make me rethink the saw that I buy.

-- - If you can't have fun doin' it, it aint worth doin' - Matt

View GaryK's profile

GaryK

10262 posts in 2489 days


#17 posted 2104 days ago

Not sure that a you can get a speed controller. It’s usually done by pulleys.

I know that Delta used to one with step pulleys. Steel City has a 2 step pully for 1500/3000 SFM

Your brother could just use a jig saw.

-- Gary - Never pass up the opportunity to make a mistake look like you planned it that way - Tyler, TX

View Matt Schnurbusch's profile

Matt Schnurbusch

36 posts in 2114 days


#18 posted 2104 days ago

He actually has a portable bandsaw for metal, but I was hoping that I could get one that would handle both metal and wood, without spending a fortune. An awfully quick search told me that wasn’t going to be possible.

-- - If you can't have fun doin' it, it aint worth doin' - Matt

View Matt Schnurbusch's profile

Matt Schnurbusch

36 posts in 2114 days


#19 posted 2104 days ago

Anyone have a suggestion on a metal/wood saw that is in the same ballpark quality-wise as the 0555? Obviously the price is going to go up some, but I may convice my brother to pitch in a little. I saw the Jet JWBS-14MW. Looks like everyother jet BS, does anyone know anything on quality, and usability?

-- - If you can't have fun doin' it, it aint worth doin' - Matt

View marcb's profile

marcb

762 posts in 2174 days


#20 posted 2104 days ago

Wood/Metal bandsaws are really only good for one or the other without a LOT of cleanup in between media.

View Taigert's profile

Taigert

593 posts in 2342 days


#21 posted 2104 days ago

Matt,
I would not want to work with metal and wood in the same shop let alone the same machine. If you were to cut a piece of wood on your band saw after your brother just cut a piece of metal your wood would become imbedded with metal shavings. First off it would damage the surface of your wood, the metal shaving would tear up wood cutting blades in your jointer, planer, plane iron, chisels. And be like handling razor blades on your hands. Plus metal tends to be coated with oil to prevent rusting while being shipped, thats why metal shops are all greasy, and you look at someone who works with metal thier hands and clothes are black and oily. Thats how your wood would end up looking, which would make it next to immpoable to clean or apply a finish.
That should about cover that topic???

-- Taigert - Milan, IN

View matt garcia's profile

matt garcia

1797 posts in 2173 days


#22 posted 2104 days ago

I own a G0555 bandsaw, and a 14” Jet. My Jet has a riser block, and I use it with a taller blade for resawing. My Grizzly has the factory 1/4” bandsaw blade, and it cuts like butter. I think the Grizzly is a better bandsaw, has more power, and came factory with ball bearing guides. You are going to love your G0555, and get the riser now. I agree with GaryK about the unwanted short blades hanging around, and you have to remember the high Grizzly shipping charges. Better to pay for one shipping charge, than 2.

-- Matt Garcia Wannabe Period Furniture Maker, Houston TX

View Matt Schnurbusch's profile

Matt Schnurbusch

36 posts in 2114 days


#23 posted 2101 days ago

Well, I finally pulled the trigger. Just ordered the 0555 with riser block. Now I just need to order the extra blades from elsewhere. I see a wood slicer in my future, but I’m still not sure what other blades I want or need.

Thanks for the input everyone.

Matt

-- - If you can't have fun doin' it, it aint worth doin' - Matt

View Chris 's profile

Chris

1865 posts in 2492 days


#24 posted 2101 days ago

I love the Timberwolf blades myself…. They haven’t let me down yet.

-- "Everything that is great and inspiring is created by the individual who labors in freedom" -- Albert Einstein

View GaryK's profile

GaryK

10262 posts in 2489 days


#25 posted 2101 days ago

Good deal on getting your saw.

You want quality blade for resawing (see comment above). It will make all the difference in the world.
Here are a couple of reviews: http://lumberjocks.com/reviews/product/89

For cuts with tighter curves a 1/4” would work fine in most cases. I don’t think that an expensive blade will make that big of a difference. Something like a Lennox or Olson would be fine. 4 to 10 TPI.

I did get an 1/8” blade but I never use it. If I need that tight a cut I use my scroll saw.

Be sure to post a review when you get your saw.

-- Gary - Never pass up the opportunity to make a mistake look like you planned it that way - Tyler, TX

View brunob's profile

brunob

2275 posts in 2670 days


#26 posted 2101 days ago

I use Timberwolf blades from PS Engineering. No problems and they are great to work with.

-- Bruce from Central New York...now, if you'll pardon me, I have some sawdust to make.

View Matt Schnurbusch's profile

Matt Schnurbusch

36 posts in 2114 days


#27 posted 2095 days ago

Saw and riser came in yesterday. Boy the box was really beat up. I looked inside before taking it away from the truck and all appeared OK. Won’t really know until I have a chance to open it up all the way and start assembling it, hopefully this weekend.

Matt

-- - If you can't have fun doin' it, it aint worth doin' - Matt

View captainhappy's profile

captainhappy

3 posts in 2087 days


#28 posted 2086 days ago

Matt

I just bought the Grizzly G0555 with riser block after much web research. Have not yet used it much. I would have sprung for the xtreme, but putting on 2 weddings this year has cut into my budget.

I did a lot of research and found some posts complaining about the pins in the riser block not lining up properly. Even saw posts with guys grinding them off and making other adjustments. Apparently Grizzly tech support was not much help on this.

My pins also were off – when on the pins, the riser block did not sit flush horizontally on the joints at the top and bottom. I set it in place and found that the wheels were coplanar and the top and bottom blade guides in line.

So I went ahead and out it together without modifications and it is working great. The offset is minimal, but you would think by now that Grizzly would have corrected this. It is the kind of thing that bothers the type of guys who do woodwork even if it does not effect the function of the saw.

I am in the process of rigging dust collection using my shop vac. At the local hardware, I found a rubber union used for cast iron drain pipie- 4” on one end and 2-1/2 on the other with hose clamps – 4” end fits good on the saw and 2-1/2 fits good on the vac hose. I am also installing brushes to clean the wheels.

I do plan on buying better blades, but I don’t do a lot of resawing or veneer. So far I am real pleased with this saw.


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