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View lateralus819's profile

Type of plane for dense hardwoods (Maple/purpleheart/figured maple)

by lateralus819
posted 07-07-2013 09:22 PM


19 replies so far

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

3585 posts in 2709 days


#1 posted 07-07-2013 09:28 PM

Plane setup is the answer.
Google all the many sites that talk about planning and plane tuning.
Remember, it ain’t the arrow, it’s the indian.
Sharp iron, tight mouth, light cuts.
Keep at it, and you’ll be successful.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View Don W's profile

Don W

15546 posts in 1316 days


#2 posted 07-07-2013 09:29 PM

Scraper works best. #112, #12, #80 etc or shop made. A high angle works second best. You’ll typically need to go to a infill or LN for those. If they don’t work then a toothed plane fist, then one of the above.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View lateralus819's profile

lateralus819

1643 posts in 638 days


#3 posted 07-07-2013 09:31 PM

I was looking at scraper planes on Ebay Don. Saw i think a #112, what might be a good price for one of those types?

-- Never confuse mistakes with failure. Kevin

View Don W's profile

Don W

15546 posts in 1316 days


#4 posted 07-07-2013 09:37 PM

prices are so hard to keep up with…......A #112 in decent shape typically goes for $100+. Some much more. I paid $75 for mine because it was pretty much a steal.

The #112 is my favorite. I even prefer it over my Veritas.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View lateralus819's profile

lateralus819

1643 posts in 638 days


#5 posted 07-07-2013 09:40 PM

Is there much difference between a 112 or 12/12-1/2?

-- Never confuse mistakes with failure. Kevin

View Don W's profile

Don W

15546 posts in 1316 days


#6 posted 07-07-2013 09:48 PM

yes, although the 12 and 12 1/2 are nice. I like the #12, just not as much as the #112. Feel free to stop by and try them some time.

Here is a #112, #12, and #81

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View lateralus819's profile

lateralus819

1643 posts in 638 days


#7 posted 07-07-2013 09:52 PM

The 12 looks neat, there is one on ebay for $150.

-- Never confuse mistakes with failure. Kevin

View Don W's profile

Don W

15546 posts in 1316 days


#8 posted 07-07-2013 10:09 PM

The #12 typically sells for less than the #112. $150 sounds a little high, but I could be out of date. Prices seem to be a bit high right now.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View 8iowa's profile

8iowa

1495 posts in 2510 days


#9 posted 07-07-2013 10:13 PM

Why not contact Christopher Schwarz. He is the former editor of “Popular Woodworking” and now has his own venture, Lost Art Press. He is one of the most knowledgeable hand plane experts, and is very approachable.

-- "Heaven is North of the Bridge"

View Loren's profile

Loren

7824 posts in 2396 days


#10 posted 07-07-2013 10:29 PM

The harder and more figured a wood is, the more prone it tends
to be to tearout. Going with a plane that scrapes a little
more and cuts a little less is the answer.

Scraper planes work, but the angle is usually higher than
you’ll need.

A standard bench plane is bedded at 45 degrees, which
works well on straight-grained hardwoods and softwoods –
it is also efficient, can take deep and shallow cuts well,
and is not too much work to push around.

Move the bevel up with an aftermarket “York pitch” frog
(Lie Nielsen), an infill smoother, a custom-made wood plane,
or by back-beveling the iron by 5 degrees.

Brian Burns’s pamphlet “double bevel sharpening” is
useful in understanding and solving these issues,
both with hand planes and machines.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

7488 posts in 1432 days


#11 posted 07-07-2013 10:42 PM

Different pitches of frogs

One is the Common 45 pitch, the other is a York pitch. Ends of these irons are in line with each other. Note how much higher the iron is?

A Dunlap from West germany is in the back, and has the york pitched frog.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View lateralus819's profile

lateralus819

1643 posts in 638 days


#12 posted 07-07-2013 10:46 PM

Which brands made that type of pitch? Would love to pick one up.

-- Never confuse mistakes with failure. Kevin

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

7488 posts in 1432 days


#13 posted 07-07-2013 10:48 PM

L-N makes them nowadays. That Dunlap was an Antique Store buy @ $8 + tax. The “pitch” on it is milled right in the base. Otherwise, the frog would sit at a “normal” 45*.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View Don W's profile

Don W

15546 posts in 1316 days


#14 posted 07-07-2013 10:51 PM

They are extremely hard to find. Bandit didn’t even know he was buying it until he got it. I’ve never seen one. LN makes one for their #4. Personally I’d buy a nice infill, just because they are cool first.

There is also this trick, http://www.woodcentral.com/cgi-bin/readarticle.pl?dir=smalser&file=articles_449.shtml
or this trick, http://lumberjocks.com/projects/62562

or just make a krenov style smoother with a 50 or 55 degree bed.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View AKwoodwkr's profile

AKwoodwkr

7 posts in 533 days


#15 posted 07-07-2013 11:15 PM

Sharp, sharp, sharp. Its all about a sharp well tuned plane and a light cut. Get it sharp, close up the mouth, and set the chipbreaker as close as possible. I smoothed some curly maple yesterday with a LN with a 45 degree frog, but my vintage Stanleys will do it to. With a very closely set chipbreaker I got a nice smooth surface. If I do get tearout my LV BUS will usually take care of it.

As another poster said, A back bevel will raise the effective cutting angle if sharp and well tuned don’t cut it. Then go to a bevel up smoother, or a scraper plane as a last resort.

If your plane is chattering its either not sharp or its not sharp and the iron is not bedded well and/or you are trying to take to rank of a cut.

Jonathan

-- “It’s good to have an end to journey toward; but it is the journey that matters, in the end.” Ursula K. LeGuin

View lateralus819's profile

lateralus819

1643 posts in 638 days


#16 posted 07-07-2013 11:16 PM

Good idea Don. I’ve been wanting to build a wooden plane. I think a krenov style smoother and jointer is in my near future. Which degree would be better 50 or 55?

-- Never confuse mistakes with failure. Kevin

View lateralus819's profile

lateralus819

1643 posts in 638 days


#17 posted 07-08-2013 12:02 AM

As Homer Simpson would say “DOH”. I didn’t realize how dull the blade was in my #6. Well, dull to be planing purpleheart. I was breezing thru african mahogany so i figured it was sharp. I just hit it with the wet stone for a few minutes and it went through the purpleheart no problem, skewing helped much more as well. Thanks all.

-- Never confuse mistakes with failure. Kevin

View Don W's profile

Don W

15546 posts in 1316 days


#18 posted 07-08-2013 12:07 AM

join this http://lumberjocks.com/donwilwol/blog/36743

and start with 55*

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View lateralus819's profile

lateralus819

1643 posts in 638 days


#19 posted 07-08-2013 12:09 AM

Cool Don, sounds good. Thanks for the invite. I must say, thank you for everything Don, you’ve been a source of great advice and I’m glad to know you personally.

-- Never confuse mistakes with failure. Kevin

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