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advice for issues with collecting final payment

by Jerry
posted 07-06-2013 12:12 AM


1 2 3 next »
103 replies

103 replies so far

View Charlie's profile

Charlie

1065 posts in 1040 days


#1 posted 07-06-2013 12:34 AM

What your rights are should be spelled out in the contract. You spell out the exact scope of work and you also spell out payment schedules. If he’s beyond the contract for final payment, you are well within your rights to go pay him a visit and just tell him you were in the area and thought you’d stop by to see if any problems have come up that you weren’t aware of.

View Loren's profile

Loren

7831 posts in 2402 days


#2 posted 07-06-2013 12:38 AM

When you are dealing with this sort of higher-end client
they may string you along for accounting and tax reasons…
assuming they aren’t out to cheat you.

There are books with polite collection letters in them
and I suggest you consult one or two to see if you
can find something that has a friendly/firm tone
you can adapt to your cause.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View Don W's profile

Don W

15581 posts in 1321 days


#3 posted 07-06-2013 12:41 AM

it should also be in writing that after 30 days you have a right to charge interest. I know it doesn’t help, but sometime additional fees forces payment. I worked for guys like that. It seemed the more money they had, the harder it was to get it.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View HillbillyShooter's profile

HillbillyShooter

4905 posts in 1046 days


#4 posted 07-06-2013 12:49 AM

Check out your state’s mechanic lien laws and don’t let them expire—some high rollers are notorious for cheating their subs out of small amounts of money—not enough to make it economically feasible to hire an attorney but enough to rob the sub of his profit. I know you hate to loose jobs in this economy, but my opinion is that its worse to do the job and loose your profit while just contributing to that high roller’s bank account.

-- John C. -- "Firearms are second only to the Constitution in importance; they are the peoples' liberty's teeth." George Washington

View Buckethead's profile

Buckethead

1959 posts in 622 days


#5 posted 07-06-2013 12:53 AM

Got to the mattresses.

-- Bucket, any person that spends 10k on a bicycle is guaranteed to be a $@I almost started to like you. -bhog

View Dallas's profile

Dallas

3217 posts in 1241 days


#6 posted 07-06-2013 01:05 AM

Hmmm, I’m not sure where you live but go into the building you installed the cabinets in and uninstall them.
I would bet that within 30 minutes you will have a contractor on site and a few minutes after that you’ll have a check (Although I would demand cash).

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

View Boatman53's profile

Boatman53

848 posts in 950 days


#7 posted 07-06-2013 01:22 AM

That is why I will never work for a contractor again, except for one. He was/is a customer of mine in the boating world and needs me for his boat so we already have that relationship. Anybody else, no. If they really need my skills I will only work for the owner. Good luck.
Jim

-- Jim, Long Island, NY Ancorayachtservice.com home of the chain leg vise

View jimmyb's profile

jimmyb

178 posts in 646 days


#8 posted 07-06-2013 01:24 AM

I agree, a mechanic’s is your strongest weapon.

-- Jim, Tinley Park, IL http://jbuda.net

View Makarov's profile

Makarov

87 posts in 559 days


#9 posted 07-06-2013 01:31 AM

Small claims court get judgment then take his tools if he doesn’t pay you. No lawyers just you him and the judge. 10000 limit in TX.

-- "Complexity is easy; Simplicity is difficult." Georgy Shragin Designer of ppsh41 sub machine gun

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

2253 posts in 2301 days


#10 posted 07-06-2013 01:32 AM

Thanks guys. I do need to do something quick as I am starting to wonder. I think I am going to seek the advice of an attorney as I think a letter from an attorney would not cost too much but could be a little more forceful than I am. Probably stopping by to see if there may be any problems would also work fine.

My thinking though, if he had issues with anything in the cabinet job, he has had ample opportunity to bring it to my attention and there is really no issue in a cabinet project of this magnitude that could possibly be valued at nearly 5,000.00 or justify withholding nearly 5,000.00.

-- Jerry Nettrour, San Antonio, www.topqualitycabinets.net

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

2253 posts in 2301 days


#11 posted 07-06-2013 01:38 AM

Dallas, I am in San Antonio. One other thing, which should not matter really. The builder sold his model home. Then the home we did the cabinet job on, the builder leased that home from the actual owner in order to use as his new model home. So now his actual model home has our cabinets inside. I heard he is currently building another model home to move into when his current lease expires. So removing the cabinets will cause a big scene and probably could get me arrested. I don’t know. But I know I would love to go and get my cabinets. However there is some heavy granite on them. I could get the upper cabinets.

-- Jerry Nettrour, San Antonio, www.topqualitycabinets.net

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

2253 posts in 2301 days


#12 posted 07-06-2013 01:39 AM

I just checked, the Texas Mechanic’s Lien expires in 4 years. That is really good to know. Thanks for that info.

-- Jerry Nettrour, San Antonio, www.topqualitycabinets.net

View Tim's profile

Tim

1394 posts in 715 days


#13 posted 07-06-2013 01:41 AM

It could be for lots of reasons, but it’s highly likely Loren is right. Pretty much all big companies do this to whatever smaller companies they can get away with doing it to. The longer they avoid paying out money the less interest, fees, etc they pay and the more money they have to earn money with. So find your leverage points and use them. Small claims/mechanics liens are powerful but keep them in your back pocket. You could talk to other contractors that have worked with them to see if they do it to everyone and if they eventually pay. If so, leverage harder.

View Dallas's profile

Dallas

3217 posts in 1241 days


#14 posted 07-06-2013 01:52 AM

Jerry, I haven’t done it in Texas, although I live here, but call the county sheriff and have them send a deputy with you.
You own that product, not the contractor.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

2253 posts in 2301 days


#15 posted 07-06-2013 01:55 AM

Thanks for the info guys.

-- Jerry Nettrour, San Antonio, www.topqualitycabinets.net

View RonInOhio's profile

RonInOhio

720 posts in 1618 days


#16 posted 07-06-2013 01:55 AM

I agree with Tim. Ripping off small guys is a very common practice. These contractors are always trying to find ways
to come in close to their bids to keep customers happy.

And anyway they can save a buck is fair game. Even at your expense. This practice isn’t limited to contractors. It goes on in almost every business.

Don’t let this slide. Just know your rights and approach things the right (legal) way.

View Stephenw's profile

Stephenw

273 posts in 1139 days


#17 posted 07-06-2013 02:04 AM

I’m not a contractor and I didn’t stay at a Holiday Inn last night…

I have heard of subcontractors placing a lien on a house and sending a copy to the general contractor in order to get paid.

-- http://www.garagebulletin.com/

View HillbillyShooter's profile

HillbillyShooter

4905 posts in 1046 days


#18 posted 07-06-2013 02:10 AM

The problem is not how long before the mechanics lien expires, but rather you need to find out how long you have to file the lien after the last work was done or materials supplied—usually a matter of months.

-- John C. -- "Firearms are second only to the Constitution in importance; they are the peoples' liberty's teeth." George Washington

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

2253 posts in 2301 days


#19 posted 07-06-2013 02:14 AM

Yeah, I think I mis read it. Reading further into it I find that 4 months is the expiration date. So I am still within that time period. I just need to go and file the lien, but first I want to speak with an attorney. I just hope we get paid.

-- Jerry Nettrour, San Antonio, www.topqualitycabinets.net

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

2253 posts in 2301 days


#20 posted 07-06-2013 02:20 AM

We completed the final punch list the very end of April. However, the second week of May the project manager called advising me that our bid included appliance panels, which I don’t think it did, but instead of arguing that our contract did not include any appliance panels, I felt it was easier to just build them and install them. So actually I was last on the job site installing appliance panels the 3rd week of May. And since this is just the first week of July I believe I am well within time limits for a mechanic’s lien. I am going to consult an attorney first thing on Monday.

-- Jerry Nettrour, San Antonio, www.topqualitycabinets.net

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

11552 posts in 1444 days


#21 posted 07-06-2013 02:21 AM

Jerry, I would go for a personal face to face before I spent money with an atty. You don’t have to get ugly/confrontational just act like you are not leaving without the check.

Or have uncle Guido pay him a visit!

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

2253 posts in 2301 days


#22 posted 07-06-2013 02:27 AM

gfadvm, I like that idea also. I should just pay him a visit on Monday. Then if no success, pay the attorney a visit on Tuesday. I think he knows my personality is more of a laid back type and I wonder if he just wants to see if he can take advantage of us. He might be miscalculating me as I will not just over look the debt. I do plan to be tactful and will act within the limitations of the law. But I will pursue him more aggressively than I have so far.

-- Jerry Nettrour, San Antonio, www.topqualitycabinets.net

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

5304 posts in 1331 days


#23 posted 07-06-2013 02:31 AM

Why waste the time?

A letter from an attorney with the intent to file a Lien and intent to perfect the Lien
will do more than “talking”.

He knows what’s up and he’s playing you.

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

15090 posts in 2430 days


#24 posted 07-06-2013 02:31 AM

He is obviously a real business man. Business is about screwing everyone you can out of everything you can, or at least using their capital as long as possible. If you are going to play in the big guy’s court, you are expected to take it on the chin like any good team player will.

I would file the lien ASAP! Make sure you did not have to file notices that have expired time limits. He would be the first guy on my do not work for list. He would not get an second chance to lie about paying today. My policy was always I could go bankrupt faster working for free than sitting in the shade drinking beer all day.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View cabmaker's profile

cabmaker

1311 posts in 1563 days


#25 posted 07-06-2013 02:31 AM

Jerry,

You can go to your nearest courthouse in the appropriate jurisdiction and file a mechanic and material mans lien on your own ,

You ,based on what I have just read come to the wrong place for your question.

I wouldn’t advise going to the property and removing anything as that would immediately change the direction of your case.

I sweet letter of intent would be meaningless to this fellow.

The notion that it is based solely on his accounting practices is absurd. I can assure you that this is not his first time to do this.

Being in the upscale building business is no assurance at all that this guy practices sound business practices.

He very likely has less coin in his pocket than yourself, therein is the danger !

File a lien soon. Contact the prospective buyer of the property if your privy to that information and let them know what has happened.

Contact other subs involved to see what sort of dealings they have had. You may find that he owes quite a lot of money.

PM his DBA to me if you will. I know a few high dollars in your area .But I’m sure he s just a wannabe.

JB

View RonInOhio's profile

RonInOhio

720 posts in 1618 days


#26 posted 07-06-2013 02:32 AM

My money says he gives you the run around again. I wouldn’t accept an answer like , ” I’ll send the check out tomorrow”.

He has already lied to you on several occassions.

Anyway,good luck. Hope you are successful in getting paid.

Keep us informed. Its all kind of interesting.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

835 posts in 1063 days


#27 posted 07-06-2013 02:47 AM

In my state once something is attached to the building, like carpet cabinets it is illegal to remove them for non-payment. I’m sure this is the case in many states.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View KayBee's profile

KayBee

1025 posts in 2000 days


#28 posted 07-06-2013 03:18 AM

I’ve known a few cabinetmakers and trim carpenters that built that final payment into the rest of the contract. That way, when they got stiffed for the final payment, well they already had the money. If they get the money, it’s like an extra Christmas. So, it’s the way a lot of people do business.

-- Karen - a little bit of stupid goes a long way

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

2253 posts in 2301 days


#29 posted 07-06-2013 03:23 AM

that would mean charging 20% more. not a bad idea if i could make that sale.

-- Jerry Nettrour, San Antonio, www.topqualitycabinets.net

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112939 posts in 2331 days


#30 posted 07-06-2013 03:31 AM

Lots of good Ideas, a strong contract with getting paid ahead of the contractor so that a check is in hand before final installation works best. I agree with getting a lien on the property and filing a small claims against him and the owner,this way he has two people on his case.
I had a friend who had a similar problem and after weeks of trying to get paid some howall the doors disappeared off the job 30 in all. When the contractor asked where they doors had gone my friend said he didn’t know but that he could make new doors and match the stain perfectly for about $ 800 more than what was owed,of course it required cash when the contractor came to get the doors, Some how (wink wink) my friend had the doors ready in only 2 days finish and all.:))

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Tim's profile

Tim

1394 posts in 715 days


#31 posted 07-06-2013 03:44 AM

Any attorney will tell you to go talk to the contractor and try to settle it before escalating it to legal channels, because it often works. A good one will tell you that for free, and a bad one will charge you for that advice too. If you don’t walk out with a check then go see the attorney and/or file the lien. He’s probably pushing you to see how far you’ll let it go, but don’t waste your money if you don’t have to. Checking in with an attorney on the right way to file the lien should be pretty cheap though. Ask first how they charge.

This isn’t just something contractors do, it’s common practice in fortune 500 companies to have a 90 or 180 day or more wait policy before paying accounts payable. The longer the better for them and they push it more with smaller companies they owe. This guy probably has a number in mind that he’s waiting for or he’s waiting until it’s too late for you to file a lien. Hard to say which but the more you let him know you’re serious the more chance you have of getting paid. You’ll probably get more respect too.

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

2253 posts in 2301 days


#32 posted 07-06-2013 03:58 AM

Yes, I hope the reasons are innocent. But I believe the construction loan closed in May, so would assume the builder has been paid out by the bank.

-- Jerry Nettrour, San Antonio, www.topqualitycabinets.net

View Grandpa's profile

Grandpa

3212 posts in 1429 days


#33 posted 07-06-2013 03:59 AM

Small Claims Court. You have a contract and can prove they owe you so you will be able to get your money. All it costs is the filing.

View devann's profile

devann

1735 posts in 1446 days


#34 posted 07-06-2013 05:34 AM

Go ahead and file the lien Jerry. And if I have had to file a lien against a contractor/ property owner in the past but I still thought that I would do business with them, I would file a lien up front, after the contract was signed. It’s a nice way of letting them know how much you thought they appreciated doing business with you the first time. It’s worked for me so far.

-- Darrell, making more sawdust than I know what to do with

View Tennessee's profile

Tennessee

1583 posts in 1268 days


#35 posted 07-06-2013 11:01 AM

Jerry: I sell for a mechanical contractor, and one of my other duties for the MC is to take care of really late payments.
Here’s the deal – forget the attorney, you don’t need one right away.
As long as you have completed your punch list, what is happening is you are the victim of a builder who tried to cut his profit a little thin, and now is just not paying out to some of his subs in the hope that they will just go away and write it off. Seen it a lot of times.

Here’s the process:
First, go to your county courthouse, or the county where the house sits, and file a lien against the house and the builder. In my state, Tennessee, this is about $12 depending on county. Also, find out how long the liens are good for. In the two major Tennessee counties where we do most of our business, one county is only one month, another is 12 months. (The length the lien is in effect). When we do business in the state of Georgia, we were happy to find out that liens are forever, until we remove them. This means as soon as he sells the house, the bank has to pay your monies because the bank will do due diligence on any liens, and yours will pop in the state computers.
If you do not have an interest charge listed on your initial contract, you cannot add it after the fact. We learned this the hard way, and now have a suitable interest charge for non-payment after a certain date on all of our contracts. So far, it has kicked in once, and boy, was that guy pissed but we got our money.
After you make sure the lien is filed within the proper time period, (these things do have limits, depending on where you are in the food chain, and subs do have a clock on them), then you have to sue.
You can do this usually with a one page form available at the same courthouse you got the lien at. I’ve done it a number of times, and it usually takes a one paragraph statement on the form, with some legal stuff that is not hard at all. Example: When we sued a guy over a hotel in Georgia, the county constable delivers the lawsuit. (The lien was in place, but he had no intention of selling the hotel, so that was not of much use.) Usually this delivery is enough to make them pay right away, and the Georgia guy sent a check the day he got served by a person with a badge. But one guy resisted us in Hamilton County, Tennessee, and we had to go to court.
Still no attorney to this point.
When we showed for the court date, there are attorneys who just hang out at the courthouse waiting for business. They specialize in small stuff like this, and always have fixed rates. We got a guy to do it for $300, and we went in. Obviously the builder was not there even though we was served, and we won.
When he got the judgement in the mail, he tried like hell to get us to accept the $6000 plus interest he owed us, but at that point we had turned it over to that attorney, who added 20% to the total for a total of $7200 plus interest, now about $8000. He squealed like a stuck pig, but we got our check.
I’ve done this a number of times for my company, it will happen, and if the work was done, and the punch list is complete and finished, you WILL win.
Good luck, and welcome to the new world!
By the way, we kept that initial attorney. We never talk to him so we don’t get charged, and if we have a late payment, we still do the lien and lawsuit ourselves, and only give it over to him before the court date so he does the appearance and we can keep working. He gets his cut, we get our checks.

Paul

-- Paul, Tennessee, http://www.tsunamiguitars.com

View whitebeast88's profile

whitebeast88

3606 posts in 944 days


#36 posted 07-06-2013 11:57 AM

i deal with the public everyday in my job,sometimes i have to collect over due balances.i’ve called people and get the same i’ll mail it blah,blah,blah.it has always worked for me to show up and talk face to face.i’m not confrontational either but i like to deal good or bad face to face.then if that don’t work you can put a lien on the property.i’d add late fees to the bill each time i sent one to him.hope you resolve it without to much more problems.

-- Marty.Athens,AL

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

2253 posts in 2301 days


#37 posted 07-06-2013 02:02 PM

Thanks guys, well Moday should be telling. I think I will go to his office in the morning. If no check then next stop is the court house to complete paper work for the lien and also small claims court. Hopefully a quick consult with a local attorney before I begin my day. Thanks everyone.

-- Jerry Nettrour, San Antonio, www.topqualitycabinets.net

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

5304 posts in 1331 days


#38 posted 07-06-2013 02:38 PM

Good call Jerry.

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

3589 posts in 2714 days


#39 posted 07-06-2013 02:54 PM

Uh, once the cabs are installed, they can’t be legally removed as they have become “part of the property”. A lien won’t necessarily insure prompt payment, but will preclude a clean future sale of the home. At least that’s they way it is here in MS.
I’d lawyer up in a heartbeat.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View JJohnston's profile

JJohnston

1602 posts in 2045 days


#40 posted 07-06-2013 03:00 PM

Keep us posted – we’ll all want to know how this turns out.

-- "A man may conduct himself well in both adversity and good fortune, but if you want to test his character, give him power." - Abraham Lincoln

View Makarov's profile

Makarov

87 posts in 559 days


#41 posted 07-06-2013 03:19 PM

Problem with a lien in this case is the contractor doesn’t own the house. He is leasing it back from the home owner. (probably to keep from paying liens) I have a friend who owned a band, they played at a bar, the owner refused to pay them. She went to small claims court, got a judgement. He still did not pay them. On a Saturday about 11 PM she showed up at the bar with a sheriffs deputy and cleaned out the till.

I would call him today, and leave a message that If you do not have a check in hand by 2 PM Monday you are going to have to file in small claims court Monday afternoon. The reason I say 2 pm is it gives you time to do the paperwork for a small claims case or go to the bank and cash his check. (make sure you cash it at his bank, don’t deposit it at yours) be polite, be nice but point out that your a small business and can’t afford to not be paid in a timely manor. Small claims is a do it yourself thing, just you and him and the contract.

Make sure when you file the paperwork it names him and his company.

-- "Complexity is easy; Simplicity is difficult." Georgy Shragin Designer of ppsh41 sub machine gun

View huff's profile

huff

2810 posts in 2039 days


#42 posted 07-06-2013 03:38 PM

Jerry,

Once you decide on a plan of action, make sure you follow through to the letter. I agree with setting even the time of day this matter has to be settled.

But whatever you do, you have to do exactly what you said you where going to do or it won’t mean a thing.

He’s ripping you off; you know it and he knows it.

Whatever your legal rights are, follow them to the letter!

A judgement or a lien can take forever to settle. I would also file a complaint with the Better Business Bureau.
He will get notified by the Better Business Bureau and if it doesn’t get resolved, it stays on his record until it is with the BBB.

Also you can notify other sub-contractors to let them know how he works, but don’t be surprised that you aren’t the only one he’s trying to screw out of some money.

You can damage his reputation just as easy as an unhappy customer can hurt your reputation.

-- John @ http://www.thehuffordfurnituregroup.com

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

15820 posts in 2972 days


#43 posted 07-06-2013 03:43 PM

I agree with Makarov that a lien might not work much magic in this case since the house has already been sold. I would go with a friendly face-to-face meeting first. Depending on how that goes, you might give him a deadline and tell him after that you are going to small claims court.

Aside from contractors frequently stringing their subs along on purpose, or blatantly trying to rip them off, there is another explanation I’ve seen far too many times. Many contractors (even huge ones) do not keep enough working capital to run their business properly. They are constantly robbing Peter to pay Paul by taking the money they are paid from one job and sinking it into their next venture before all the subs have even been paid in full. Then they have to wait for the next payment to come in from someone else in order to pay off the subs from that previous job. It’s not the right way to operate, but I see it all the time.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View Clint Searl's profile

Clint Searl

1479 posts in 1115 days


#44 posted 07-06-2013 03:43 PM

Send Vinny.

-- Clint Searl....Ya can no more do what ya don't know how than ya can git back from where ya ain't been

View JJohnston's profile

JJohnston

1602 posts in 2045 days


#45 posted 07-06-2013 03:44 PM

Just for the record, courts and lawyers call that “pay when paid”, and the courts have ruled that is isn’t a legitimate excuse.

-- "A man may conduct himself well in both adversity and good fortune, but if you want to test his character, give him power." - Abraham Lincoln

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JJohnston

1602 posts in 2045 days


#46 posted 07-06-2013 04:03 PM

^ That isn’t likely to work. I had a contractor abandon a job partway through, then demand additional money to finish, because he said his costs had gone up (not to mention any names, but his name is Charles Montoya / Rock Creations in Bernalillo, NM). I contacted my state contractor’s board, and they said they don’t get involved in contract abandonment issues, and in fact, don’t get involved at all until you get a judgment in the courts.

-- "A man may conduct himself well in both adversity and good fortune, but if you want to test his character, give him power." - Abraham Lincoln

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112939 posts in 2331 days


#47 posted 07-06-2013 04:34 PM

JJ in Oregon you wouldn’t have a problem,the courts here require you to have a arbitration through the builders board before proceeding through the courts. Having family in Texas it seems that it’s not even necessary to have a contractors licence in Texas so I would guess they don’t have a contractors board.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Joseph Jossem's profile

Joseph Jossem

412 posts in 1022 days


#48 posted 07-06-2013 05:15 PM

I would call and say you coming for final payment.Go to the office and wait until he pays you dont leave till you get payment.If they refuse give them a bill with a late fee if you think he is never going to pay remove what you did.If you are liscened put a lien on the house.I have had this problem with highend customers and as a result will never work with a contractor again.I actually had to bring in my bobcat once park it outside the guys kitchen and threaten to demo the house to get my products back.I dont recommend that but it is hard watching people that are really well off not pay theyre bills.And most contractors I have met could care less about paying or respecting others in the business majority are con men.

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

15090 posts in 2430 days


#49 posted 07-06-2013 05:21 PM

The home owner is not going to like having a lien against his property. The builder probably had to be provide a lien release sating all subs had been paid at the sale closing. Not sure how is it with small builders, but i have had some success with the mere mention of notice of intent to lien the property of some of the world’s largest largest corporations . Nobody in the sub chains wants to be the cause of that one ;-))

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View 1thumb's profile

1thumb

78 posts in 910 days


#50 posted 07-06-2013 08:26 PM

I’m in the middle of a similar issue regarding approx. $1,000.00 owed to me by a contractor that I subbed work from. I’m knocking on the homeowner’s door on Monday, explain the situation and tell him that I have no option but to lien his property. I’m hoping he will contact the contractor and aid in collecting the money owed

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