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View RGtools's profile

Any Advice on Unloading a 460lb Bandsaw?

by RGtools
posted 06-02-2013 02:22 PM


47 replies so far

View Rick  Dennington's profile

Rick Dennington

5538 posts in 2979 days


#1 posted 06-02-2013 02:28 PM

Yep…...Round up 2-3 of your friends to help you unload the saw, and go slow…..If you bought a mobil base for it, set it down on the base, and roll it into your shop…..piece of cake….....!!!

-- My grandpa used to say: "Y'all come back when you can....come after dinner, and leave before supper.."

View muleskinner's profile

muleskinner

894 posts in 2221 days


#2 posted 06-02-2013 02:33 PM

Don’t drop it.

-- Visualize whirled peas

View ShaneA's profile

ShaneA

6828 posts in 2383 days


#3 posted 06-02-2013 02:48 PM

If it is only you, take it out of the boxes in pieces. You should be able to handle it piece by piece. When it comes time for assembly, better get a buddy or maybe the wife. Probably be a few akward lifts.

Congrats on the new saw!

View EOD_Eric's profile

EOD_Eric

29 posts in 3012 days


#4 posted 06-02-2013 03:03 PM

I got the lift gate service with mine, too. The delivery service had a large hand truck to move it to the lift gate…I asked them to move it into the shop and they were more than willing…took only a couple of minutes. May want to have a coke of a few bucks handy as compensation. Once I had it uncrated( mine was fully assembled), I just had to walk it off the bottom pallet it was on. Honestly, probably a 2 person job, but I did it solo.

View toolie's profile

toolie

2088 posts in 2413 days


#5 posted 06-02-2013 03:05 PM

appliance hand truck:

remove wheels and table for transporting.

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

View RGtools's profile

RGtools

3372 posts in 2439 days


#6 posted 06-02-2013 03:22 PM

It’s probably a solo job for me. As a farmer, my friends are wary of volunteering help without a full debrief.

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

View Bluepine38's profile

Bluepine38

3371 posts in 2870 days


#7 posted 06-02-2013 03:24 PM

It should be on a small pallet if shipped upright, or a long one if shipped flat. They should be able to roll the
pallet into your shop if the truck can back up to the doorway. With a shipping weight of 400+ lbs it would
not hurt to have an extra person available to help balance it. Once in the shop, an appliance truck might
help you move it around. Unless you have a definite spot picked out for it and it will not be moved, it might
not be a bad idea to put a mobile base under it before you assemble it. Hope you have fun and enjoy you
new bandsaw.

-- As ever, Gus-the 78 yr young apprentice carpenter

View OnlyJustME's profile

OnlyJustME

1562 posts in 2162 days


#8 posted 06-02-2013 03:34 PM

Lift with the legs not the back. Or if you have block and tackle use that.

-- In the end, when your life flashes before your eyes, will you like what you see?

View bbc557ci's profile

bbc557ci

595 posts in 1859 days


#9 posted 06-02-2013 03:41 PM

Appliance dolly/hand truck like Toolie shows. Or a 4 wheel dolly, or as suggested open the boxes and bring it in piece by piece. Yesterday I moved a Delta Unisaw with the extension into my basement alone, and all in one piece. Used planks and a dolly, and brains instead of brawn. Can be tough working alone but no big conversations about how to git’r done, and I really don’t know if another pair of hands would have made much difference. You’re a farmer….you’ll figure it out.

-- Bill, central NY...no where near the "big apple"

View poopiekat's profile

poopiekat

4320 posts in 3519 days


#10 posted 06-02-2013 05:37 PM

A good time to bring up some stuff from the point of view of the trucking industry. Freight is moved on the presumption of ‘Curb Delivery”, that is, the driver is only obligated to set your freight on the tail end of his truck; how you get it from there is strictly your responsibility. Most deliveries go to receivers with dock plates and such, and have forklfts or other equipment to get their freight off the truck.

A household delivery is another matter, and indeed you correctly specified liftgate delivery, for a few extra dollars. some carriers also offer “Inside Delivery”, which involves bringing the freight into your home to the ground-level floor. A few even offer upstairs/downstairs delivery, which is expensive and at the discretion of the carrier whether he wants to provide that service. Mostly the rules are regulated by the DOT and other Federal agencies, and by the Teamster’s Union guidelines.

Remember you can also arrange with the local terminal to have the freight left on their dock and contact you when it arrives, so you can bring your truck or trailer to them; almost always they will be happy to load it onto your vehicle in their yard, but arrange for this way ahead of time. Speak with several dispatchers and find the right service for you.

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

View knotheadswoodshed's profile

knotheadswoodshed

209 posts in 1957 days


#11 posted 06-02-2013 05:57 PM

a couple of 230 lb guys should be able to handle it :)

-- Randy - "I dont make mistakes, I make design change opportunities" www.knotheadswoodshed.com

View Don W's profile

Don W

18478 posts in 2352 days


#12 posted 06-02-2013 06:13 PM

-- http://timetestedtools.net - Collecting is an investment in the past, and the future.

View RGtools's profile

RGtools

3372 posts in 2439 days


#13 posted 06-02-2013 08:15 PM

^I thought about the tractor Don. But how do you balance it without forks? (Lots of baling wire lying around…)

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

View Don W's profile

Don W

18478 posts in 2352 days


#14 posted 06-02-2013 08:58 PM

I use ratchet straps nice and tight!

-- http://timetestedtools.net - Collecting is an investment in the past, and the future.

View SFLTim's profile

SFLTim

59 posts in 1766 days


#15 posted 06-02-2013 09:14 PM

I bought the same saw a few months ago. It was delivered bolted to a small pallet in the upright position. I got the lift gate service, and when the guy put it on the ground he had a small pallet-jack and rolled it right into the garage. I gave him $15 for his effort.

View Grandpa's profile

Grandpa

3258 posts in 2460 days


#16 posted 06-02-2013 09:16 PM

+1 for Don and the ratchet straps. Caution should be exercised

View Dave's profile

Dave

11425 posts in 2625 days


#17 posted 06-02-2013 10:37 PM

What Don said. The big orange thingy.

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

View RGtools's profile

RGtools

3372 posts in 2439 days


#18 posted 06-03-2013 12:04 AM

I could ratchet strap it to the main arm….alright. I will start with just a hand truck and if things get dire, I’ll burn some diesel.

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

View jusfine's profile

jusfine

2422 posts in 2711 days


#19 posted 06-03-2013 01:25 AM

Wishing you all the Best!

I have a “funny” story about dropping my brand new 15” thickness planer 11’ off my elevator in my barn when I bought it – it landed on the clay floor and I was forced to replace a small gear and a broken handle before I ever got to turn it on. The General is still running strong over a dozen years later.

I should make a video showing how it happened, really hard to explain, and I sure did not think it was funny at the moment it happened. Time heals…

-- Randy "You are judged as much by the questions you ask as the answers you give..."

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

14940 posts in 2475 days


#20 posted 06-03-2013 01:28 AM

I have that same saw and had the trucker put it on my tilt trailer which I backed up to the shop and slid it off with help from 1 friend.

They do have a lift ring in the top if your shop door is tall enough to pick it up with a front loader.

You will enjoy this saw. I certainly have!

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View Shawn Masterson's profile

Shawn Masterson

1319 posts in 1733 days


#21 posted 06-03-2013 12:52 PM

You have a loader tractor and you are asking how to move a saw. You need a snickers!! slide the skid in the bucket and use a ratchet strap to secure it to the bucket. Easy one man operation.

View AnthonyReed's profile

AnthonyReed

9340 posts in 2225 days


#22 posted 06-03-2013 01:48 PM

You realize you are obligated to provide pictures of the method that results in success, right? Be careful up there.

-- ~Tony

View BBF's profile

BBF

143 posts in 1624 days


#23 posted 06-03-2013 01:58 PM

I would use the lift eye and tractor pick it up and put it right on the mobile base. You did get a mobile base didn’t you?
Nice little city tractor there .

-- I've never been disappointed buying quality but I have been disappointed buying good enough.

View terryR's profile

terryR

6894 posts in 2093 days


#24 posted 06-03-2013 02:41 PM

My goodness, what a saw, Ryan!

It will ship in pieces, the frigging table will push 75 pounds alone, so you may be able to push the main unit on a set of hand trucks into the shop for assembly. I managed my 300 pound Grizzly alone in this manner.

Better yet, offer the truck driver a 10 spot and a cold one for 5 minites of his time…

-- tr ...see one, do one, teach one...

View RGtools's profile

RGtools

3372 posts in 2439 days


#25 posted 06-03-2013 06:25 PM

Thanks for all the advice guys. I will try to get pics of the process. My tractor might be able to clear the lift eye, I can clear a 6’ fence with the bucket.

Heard and understood on the tractor, if have that and I can’t get it done…I can’t get it done.

Tomorrow is the day. I really did think it would be today based on my shipping notice. But this gives me time to get my $#% together.
Randy.
I can close my eyes and see you having a “Cliffhanger” moment as the planer was taken by gravity. Pics would be worth sharing though.

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

View jusfine's profile

jusfine

2422 posts in 2711 days


#26 posted 06-03-2013 11:20 PM

Thanks… I think. Obviously I did not take photos while it happened, but maybe this description of the “event” will do for now.

I bought a brand new 15” General International thickness planer, hauled it home and put it on the elevator. See photo below. This is a steel frame with a base and set up to raise and lower in the space with a center pull sling. 5’ wide x 10’ long

We raised the elevator and were just smiling at how easy this was, no heavy lifting, nothing strenuous.

Then we started rolling the machine toward the end of the elevator floor toward the shop door (towards where I took the photo from). The weight of the machine tipped the frame lower on this end, so we raised the deck a bit higher (center pivot point) but it was enough that it cleared the barn loft floor at the opposite end, the planer disappeared, and the elevator swung back into place like it was never there. Whole thing probably took 5 seconds if that.

Below is a crude sketch, maybe it is clearer. First picture is the elevator concept, second is a section viewed through the floor of the barn loft and elevator. Not to Scale of course.

Last is the disappearing planer…

I yelled NOOOOOOO! and then ran downstairs to see what the damage was. Fortunately it was slight, and with some minor repairs, has been running fine ever since.

I am a lot more careful when offloading anything heavy from the end of the platform…

Hope your unloading goes cleanly and without any drama.

-- Randy "You are judged as much by the questions you ask as the answers you give..."

View RGtools's profile

RGtools

3372 posts in 2439 days


#27 posted 06-04-2013 03:37 AM

Oops. Note to self: center of gravity is worth noting. Thanks for sharing.

Well, I find out tomorrow if I can get it done.

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

View Fresch's profile

Fresch

81 posts in 1705 days


#28 posted 06-04-2013 11:59 AM

You can roll it on pipe or rod, we do it all the time moving switch gear, transformers, etc., at work all the time.

View RGtools's profile

RGtools

3372 posts in 2439 days


#29 posted 06-05-2013 12:39 AM

Ratchet straps are for sissy’s.

My contractor (dong some fencing that I don’t have time for) actually came up and offered to use the bobcat to lift this thing. With the mass that thing had all I had to do was keep the saw steady and it was a pretty smooth ride to the shop.

That is the most un-crate like crate I have ever seen, but the saw appears to be fine. Still need to unpack and assemble, but I have too much work to do today (farm life for you…and I love it).

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

View jusfine's profile

jusfine

2422 posts in 2711 days


#30 posted 06-05-2013 12:43 AM

Every farmer needs a bobcat! Looks like my 175. I couldn’t work around the farm without mine.

It appears you got the job done without incident! Make sure you inspect it well, the un-crate doesnt have much protection for the tool.

-- Randy "You are judged as much by the questions you ask as the answers you give..."

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

14940 posts in 2475 days


#31 posted 06-05-2013 01:55 AM

See, all that fretting for nothing!

Now set that puppy up and enjoy!

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View ,'s profile

,

2387 posts in 3332 days


#32 posted 06-05-2013 02:06 AM

Your situation is different than ours, but we unloaded our 1,000 lb bandsaw and just simply used gravity, no one stronger than gravity :)

Of course a bobcat will do it…

-- .

View AnthonyReed's profile

AnthonyReed

9340 posts in 2225 days


#33 posted 06-05-2013 02:59 AM

Good to see and hear it went smoothly. Congrats Ryan.

-- ~Tony

View Don W's profile

Don W

18478 posts in 2352 days


#34 posted 06-05-2013 11:47 AM

Ratchet straps are for sissy’s.

Say’s the guy with a contractor’s help. :-)

-- http://timetestedtools.net - Collecting is an investment in the past, and the future.

View RGtools's profile

RGtools

3372 posts in 2439 days


#35 posted 06-05-2013 12:35 PM

^called me on that one.

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

7609 posts in 2699 days


#36 posted 06-05-2013 12:42 PM

Don +10

Me too! ;-)

Sincerely yours,
Safe Sissy

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View blackcherry's profile

blackcherry

3335 posts in 3608 days


#37 posted 06-05-2013 12:44 PM

Grizzly will set it where you want it place and then it all up to you to set up .

View Straightbowed's profile

Straightbowed

717 posts in 2083 days


#38 posted 06-05-2013 02:31 PM

if your a farmer put an eye bolt in top, take tractor loader pick it up and your done, that’s what I done I own a farm and have a tractor loader I do all my pickups and unloads myself went to TSC and bought some good straps and haven’t looked back since

-- Stevo, work in tha city woodshop in the country

View Straightbowed's profile

Straightbowed

717 posts in 2083 days


#39 posted 06-05-2013 02:33 PM

if I was younger I could pick it up myself but those days are over use to pick up 250 pound calves and load them in tha trailer, if I tried now I think my right walnut would fall off the tree

-- Stevo, work in tha city woodshop in the country

View Straightbowed's profile

Straightbowed

717 posts in 2083 days


#40 posted 06-05-2013 02:35 PM

too late as always day late dollar short

-- Stevo, work in tha city woodshop in the country

View rkober's profile

rkober

137 posts in 2077 days


#41 posted 06-05-2013 03:31 PM

I unloaded mine with a loader fortunately (same one). However once I had it on the apron of my shop I had to move it through the 36” entry door. I cut several pieces of pipe I had (1-1/2” or 2” ?) and simply rolled it into place. Worked great. I love that saw btw.

-- Ray - Spokane, WA - “Most people don’t recognize opportunity because it’s usually disguised as hard work.” - Unknown

View Denco's profile

Denco

39 posts in 1604 days


#42 posted 06-05-2013 03:42 PM

Find 3 teenage boys and have 2 giant pizzas and 5 2-liter bottles of soda ready. When my son was in high school, these kinds of deals got all kinds of work done for me.

-- Cut wood or cut weeds today.....well, 6ft weeds can go another week.

View DrDirt's profile

DrDirt

4389 posts in 3527 days


#43 posted 06-05-2013 04:50 PM

4 wheel furniture dolly
11.99 at harbor freight – holds 1000 pounds –
So long as the drive isn’t gravel you should be able to move it around just like it was on a mobile base.

-- 'Political correctness is fascism pretending to be manners' ~George Carlin

View RGtools's profile

RGtools

3372 posts in 2439 days


#44 posted 06-05-2013 06:51 PM

Mike aka Safe Sissy THANK YOU for the the way you called me on the safety thing. Admittedly this was not one of my brighter OSHA moments and I kind of hoped I would take some flak. I appreciate both that you did it AND the way you went about it.

Can’t wait to use the saw, but last night I had a horrible epiphany:

I don’t have a NEMA 6-15 anywhere in my shop (smacks forhead repeatedly, hard, while saying “how did I miss that”). So I guess I have a small project before I get started.

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

View theoldfart's profile

theoldfart

9111 posts in 2236 days


#45 posted 06-05-2013 07:28 PM

NEMA 6-15 ???

-- "With every tool obtained, there is another that is needed" DonW ( Kevin )

View RGtools's profile

RGtools

3372 posts in 2439 days


#46 posted 06-05-2013 08:57 PM

^220V socket. Looks like this…

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

View toolie's profile

toolie

2088 posts in 2413 days


#47 posted 06-05-2013 09:31 PM

if the circuit is a 20A 220v circuit, use a nema 6-20R receptacle:

it accommodates both 15 and 20A 220v plugs. the,forgive me, chinaman you pictured (that’s a 6-15 configuration) as well as a 6-20P plug:

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

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