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View Justin M Schmidt's profile

Bandsaw Blades - basics and advice??

by Justin M Schmidt
posted 04-09-2013 05:19 PM


22 replies so far

View Cole Tallerman's profile

Cole Tallerman

392 posts in 2185 days


#1 posted 04-09-2013 05:26 PM

I don’t think your going to be able to cut 3” thick hardwoods with that machine. At least not very cleanly. Also, I have no idea about blades. sorry!

View Justin M Schmidt's profile

Justin M Schmidt

17 posts in 1901 days


#2 posted 04-09-2013 05:28 PM

Cole – thanks for the heads up. I know it’s a long shot to work something that thick with this lil’ guy, but I’ll fail at anything once!

Luckily that’s not what I’m using it for the most and I have access to a 14” Rikon… it’s just not in my shop. ;)

-- Justin M Schmidt | Somerville, Massachusetts | http://jusbot.com

View Brian's profile

Brian

180 posts in 2032 days


#3 posted 04-09-2013 05:31 PM

I’m also curious about what bandsaw blades people recommend. I bought a Grizzly 555 and need to get something other than that factory blade on there. I’ll need multiple blades however since I will make some small curved cuts at time and also just resawing. Thanks in advance!

-- “Always take a banana to a party, bananas are good!” - Tenth Doctor

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8535 posts in 3649 days


#4 posted 04-09-2013 05:38 PM

with bandsaws – one blade to rule them all is usually not a good option. especially if one of the intended purposes is to do tight curves.

here is a good blade reference (from Rikon):
http://rikontools.com/bladeselection.pdf

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

5663 posts in 2814 days


#5 posted 04-09-2013 05:54 PM

I use the philosophy that any cut made at the bandsaw is not a finish cut. It will always be faired at the router table or sanding station. Therfore, I choose a blade that will cut quickly and easily for tasks like cutting gentle arches as well as resawing.
I use a 3 TPI hooked blade that is 1/2” wide. It works for almost everything I do. The brand is Olsen All Pro, but I think there are many comparable brands.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View Justin M Schmidt's profile

Justin M Schmidt

17 posts in 1901 days


#6 posted 04-09-2013 06:08 PM

BuzzBate – I want a 555! Some day when I outgrow this little saw.

-- Justin M Schmidt | Somerville, Massachusetts | http://jusbot.com

View Brian's profile

Brian

180 posts in 2032 days


#7 posted 04-09-2013 06:14 PM

I lucked into my 555. I went to a guys house to buy a grizzly dust collector and the saw was sitting in the garage. Package deal made it worth my while.

-- “Always take a banana to a party, bananas are good!” - Tenth Doctor

View Justin M Schmidt's profile

Justin M Schmidt

17 posts in 1901 days


#8 posted 04-09-2013 06:17 PM

PurpLev – that doc is GREAT! Exactly what I was looking for.

-- Justin M Schmidt | Somerville, Massachusetts | http://jusbot.com

View Kreegan's profile

Kreegan

1452 posts in 2147 days


#9 posted 04-09-2013 06:19 PM

I have that exact saw. It’s cut pretty much everything I’ve been able to fit under its 4 5/8” max height. I’ve cut green wood, kiln dried, MDF, etc. One of the first things I’d recommend, if you don’t already have one is a nice shop vac or dust collector with a 2 1/2” hose or adapter. It tends to make lots of fine dust and needs to be well-cleaned and maintained.

As for blades, I bought a 3 pack from Craftsman. I used the 6TPI 1/4” blade for awhile and it worked just fine. I recently switched to a 3/8” 3 TPI Woodturners blade with an alternate set and raker tooth pattern. This works great as most of what I use this for is cutting turning blanks.

http://www.highlandwoodworking.com/woodturners-bandsawblade.aspx

I also have a Woodslicer blade from Highland as well. It’s a 1/2” 3-4 TPI blade with variable pitch blade. I have mostly used that to resaw white oak and walnut. It handled those jobs nicely. You gotta take your time, since the motor is only 1/3 HP, but it gets the job done. The boards I was resawing were mostly 3” wide.

http://www.highlandwoodworking.com/woodslicer12resawbandsawblades705to137.aspx

Hope that helps! It’s a good little bandsaw. I’m looking to upgrade, but that’s almost entirely due to needing more cutting height.

View Justin M Schmidt's profile

Justin M Schmidt

17 posts in 1901 days


#10 posted 04-09-2013 06:33 PM

Thanks Kreegan! Sounds like I made the right call on this saw. Most of my work will be smaller so I think it’s going to work out perfect. The real test will be the thick plywood forms, but we’ll see how it goes.

So I think I’m looking for two blades to start – a coarser 3-4 or 6 tpi 1/2” blade and a fine-toothed/thinner blade for the top/back/sides work with finer curves/etc.

-- Justin M Schmidt | Somerville, Massachusetts | http://jusbot.com

View Justin M Schmidt's profile

Justin M Schmidt

17 posts in 1901 days


#11 posted 04-09-2013 07:18 PM

I’m reading that “at least 3 teeth must be in the work piece” – I have definitely broken this rule before. What’s the logic behind it and what negative effects does ignoring this advice have?

-- Justin M Schmidt | Somerville, Massachusetts | http://jusbot.com

View Straightbowed's profile

Straightbowed

717 posts in 2298 days


#12 posted 04-09-2013 07:21 PM

you prolly will have problems tryin to resaw with a small saw get 3tpi blades and go slow slow slow unless you can really torque the blade tight

-- Stevo, work in tha city woodshop in the country

View Straightbowed's profile

Straightbowed

717 posts in 2298 days


#13 posted 04-09-2013 07:28 PM

the bigger gullets in the 3 tpi will remove sawdust and the blade will not run as hot and drain the power from your saw less bearing surface contact with the wood, small teeth will clog and make your blade run hot thus not being able to pull the saw dust away as you make your cut thus making you push harder and really not move at all 3 tpi blade you can go slow and really not strain your saw I think

-- Stevo, work in tha city woodshop in the country

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4932 posts in 3961 days


#14 posted 04-09-2013 07:36 PM

3/8” 8tpi, 1/4” 6tpi, 1/2” 3tpi. Underpowered saw, but given the right blade, will work for ya.
I’ve resawn 4” white oak on an 11” Magna (Shopsmith) with the Highland blade. Took some time, but worked pretty darned well.
I have the G0555LX now. Big difference with the same blades.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View sonnyr's profile

sonnyr

131 posts in 2129 days


#15 posted 04-09-2013 08:05 PM

I was fortunate to be able to talk to Louis Iturra at Iturra Design for about an hour one day a few months ago. IMHO the man is a wealth of knowledge. I have a 14” Reliant bandsaw that is Taiwanese look alike of a Delta. He offered me good sound advice about the saw and I purchased a couple of his “Woodslicer” type blades. They were cheaper than the other source that I had. If you can, get him to send you his catalog, IT’S AWESOME. Not only does it have the products that he sales, it is chocked full of great bandsaw information and his experience.

-- I may be slow, but I'm easy to stop!!!

View Surfside's profile

Surfside

3389 posts in 2174 days


#16 posted 04-09-2013 08:15 PM

The 3 tooth rule follows a minimum of 3 teeth engaged in a cut and a maximum of 24 teeth engaged in a cut. General info; if you are cutting a lot of thin material, then a high TPI number is required.

-- "someone has to be wounded for others to be saved, someone has to sacrifice for others to feel happiness, someone has to die so others could live"

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

14940 posts in 2690 days


#17 posted 04-10-2013 02:23 AM

Justin, The 3 teeth in the work thing is twofold: too few teeth and the blade wants to grab the workpiece and jerk it through the insert (had that happen), the second is you will get rough/torn cuts. I’ve done it as well and got away with it but holding the workpiece tightly to the table and starting with a VERY slow feed rate.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View toolie's profile

toolie

2123 posts in 2629 days


#18 posted 04-10-2013 01:26 PM

+1 on iturra. there probably isn’t a more knowledgeable guy out there on all things band saw and related. to the OP, don’t fall into the timberwolf trap. misaligned blade welds will cause you no end of grief. there’s a reason they sell 4 for the price of 3 occasionally, and it’s not because they are superior blades.

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

View Brian's profile

Brian

180 posts in 2032 days


#19 posted 04-10-2013 04:37 PM

Good information. The timberwolf blades were actually what I had been looking at. I’m not worried about spending a little bit of money on good blades, but sometimes it can be tough to figure out which ones are the good ones.

-- “Always take a banana to a party, bananas are good!” - Tenth Doctor

View Surfside's profile

Surfside

3389 posts in 2174 days


#20 posted 04-10-2013 06:40 PM

True that toolie. I knew some folks who had problems with the weld quality of timberwolf.

-- "someone has to be wounded for others to be saved, someone has to sacrifice for others to feel happiness, someone has to die so others could live"

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

14940 posts in 2690 days


#21 posted 04-11-2013 12:41 AM

Timberwolf must send me only their good welds as I’ve never had a problem. Mine wear out but don’t break

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View Surfside's profile

Surfside

3389 posts in 2174 days


#22 posted 04-11-2013 07:05 PM

Lucky you buddy. I got timberwolf and I am fine with it. Just that one of the most common complaints with them is the weld.

-- "someone has to be wounded for others to be saved, someone has to sacrifice for others to feel happiness, someone has to die so others could live"

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