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View Airspeed's profile

What the heck is this thing?

by Airspeed
posted 04-03-2013 07:49 PM


42 replies so far

View Loren's profile

Loren

7826 posts in 2399 days


#1 posted 04-03-2013 07:52 PM

Some type of reamer I reckon…. perhaps for cleaning
junk out of pipe ends.

Could be a center for chucking in a metal lathe 3-jaw
chuck.

It’s actually threaded or stepped?

You can use it as a mandrel too for bending and shaping
metal rings, though it’s a little squat.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View Airspeed's profile

Airspeed

425 posts in 654 days


#2 posted 04-03-2013 07:57 PM

It’s threaded, has one continuous thread from the point to the nut

-- http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v655/aaronhero/

View DIYaholic's profile

DIYaholic

14644 posts in 1427 days


#3 posted 04-03-2013 07:59 PM

I’m thinkin’ “Old West”....
Local Doctor/Barber….
Proctology Exam!!! ;^O

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procrastination a bad thing?

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

3694 posts in 759 days


#4 posted 04-03-2013 08:01 PM

Wow, you just took me on a “Mind trip to the past.”

When I was a kid I worked as a mechanic’s apprentice at a big truck/equipment shop. Any time someone would ask Old Charlie “What is this thing” (whatever they were holding) His answer was ALWAYS the same. “If it was up your azz you’d know!”

SO maybe it’s a butt-plug? :-) LMAO :-)

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

View Airspeed's profile

Airspeed

425 posts in 654 days


#5 posted 04-03-2013 08:07 PM

Once I figure that one out I have this object I can’t figure out! It’s made of some sort of painted steel, has a translucent red plastic doohickey on the end and has a fitted case. Any ideas on this one?

-- http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v655/aaronhero/

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

3694 posts in 759 days


#6 posted 04-03-2013 08:22 PM

That’s the RED BUTTON that the President is gonna push if that dumbass Kim Wong Dung (or whatever his name is) keeps screwing around over there in Korea

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

View Airspeed's profile

Airspeed

425 posts in 654 days


#7 posted 04-03-2013 08:25 PM

Joe, you think? Heck, I’ll push it right now if it will rid the world of Kim un dong wang!

-- http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v655/aaronhero/

View huff's profile

huff

2810 posts in 2037 days


#8 posted 04-03-2013 08:46 PM

Airspeed,

Only if you attach a nucluar warhead to your first instrument and insert it in his butt first like joe figured out and then push the red button!

-- John @ http://www.thehuffordfurnituregroup.com

View Airspeed's profile

Airspeed

425 posts in 654 days


#9 posted 04-03-2013 08:57 PM

I love my country, would die for my country but I refuse to go anywhere Kim’s or any mans rectum. I feel like traitor!

-- http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v655/aaronhero/

View pintodeluxe's profile (online now)

pintodeluxe

3569 posts in 1565 days


#10 posted 04-03-2013 08:57 PM

Water jet nozzles are similar to that. Is the nut threaded, such as to fit a garden hose?

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View Airspeed's profile

Airspeed

425 posts in 654 days


#11 posted 04-03-2013 09:00 PM

It’s solid steel, no hole on the end just a solid chunk of mystery.

-- http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v655/aaronhero/

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

3694 posts in 759 days


#12 posted 04-03-2013 09:08 PM

”just a solid chunk of mystery.”

Ok, seriously this time… Maybe it’s some sort of splitter? Looks like it has a hex end for screwing it in?

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

View Grandpa's profile

Grandpa

3209 posts in 1427 days


#13 posted 04-03-2013 09:11 PM

http://shopping.yahoo.com/29181822-thread-repair-tools-2043-tapered-reamer-18-to-12-wa-3-12-blade-length/

IT might be used for straightening threads. The lead thread on an internal thread gets damaged and you get a tool with the correct TPI to cleasn up the starting thread.

View Airspeed's profile

Airspeed

425 posts in 654 days


#14 posted 04-03-2013 09:11 PM

“Some type of splitter” I seem to keep leaning on that same thought, if so I don’t think it would work on wood with such fine threads but maybe to seperate two pieces of metal?

-- http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v655/aaronhero/

View poopiekat's profile

poopiekat

3736 posts in 2486 days


#15 posted 04-03-2013 10:00 PM

Airspeed: Could it be for balancing lawnmower blades after sharpening? Come to think of it, Travolta’s car in the aquaduct racing scene of the movie “Grease” had those things on the lug nuts of his car…. to slice up his opponent, presumably.

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

View Airspeed's profile

Airspeed

425 posts in 654 days


#16 posted 04-03-2013 10:03 PM

I think the threads would keep it from balancing, I think the threads would throw it off.

-- http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v655/aaronhero/

View remdds's profile

remdds

16 posts in 1377 days


#17 posted 04-03-2013 10:20 PM

It looks like a fitting that screws onto the shaft of a buffer motor. A rag wheel turns onto the tapered end.

View Nicky's profile

Nicky

636 posts in 2843 days


#18 posted 04-03-2013 10:49 PM

I can’t tell from the pic if it has threads or if they are machine marks.

Maybe a plumb bob?

-- Nicky

View Airspeed's profile

Airspeed

425 posts in 654 days


#19 posted 04-03-2013 11:13 PM

It definately has threads, they’re easily seen in person and don’t look like machine marks.

-- http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v655/aaronhero/

View TerryDowning's profile

TerryDowning

1025 posts in 869 days


#20 posted 04-03-2013 11:18 PM

Are the thread left handed or right handed?

-- - Terry

View Airspeed's profile

Airspeed

425 posts in 654 days


#21 posted 04-03-2013 11:20 PM

View GaryW's profile

GaryW

124 posts in 1215 days


#22 posted 04-03-2013 11:21 PM

if the threads are left handed then it maybe an bolt exstractor. we used to drill a hole into the center of a broken bolt, drive the exstractor in with a few taps of a hammar, then use a wrench to unscrew the broken bolt. The reverse threads help tighten the fit and twist the bolt out. could be Yes!

-- GaryW, Edgefield SC, Too old to start over, can't remember why...

View Marty5965's profile

Marty5965

158 posts in 697 days


#23 posted 04-03-2013 11:35 PM

Never mind what it is, where did it come from? Any contractor vehicles been in your driveway recently? Maybe that would give you a clue.

-- Marty, Columbus, OH, learning every day....

View jonny24's profile

jonny24

2 posts in 631 days


#24 posted 04-03-2013 11:39 PM

“It looks like a fitting that screws onto the shaft of a buffer motor. A rag wheel turns onto the tapered end”

Could be this. Thats how the little buffing wheels attach to my dremel, with a pointed screw thing.

Seen any giant dremels lately?

-- -Jonathan H, Ontario

View TerryDowning's profile

TerryDowning

1025 posts in 869 days


#25 posted 04-03-2013 11:48 PM

My guess is this

Tapered Buffing Spindle Right Thread they’re also availble in left hand thread

-- - Terry

View ksSlim's profile

ksSlim

1011 posts in 1641 days


#26 posted 04-03-2013 11:58 PM

I agree, Terry nailed it.
Plating and polishing companies use Baldor motors with double shafts.
One shat requires RH threads, the other requires LH threads.
I have half inch versions in my shop.

Start buffer, hold buff wheel close, it will thread itself onto spindle.
Apply buffeing compound and remove tool marks.

-- Sawdust and shavings are therapeutic

View Airspeed's profile

Airspeed

425 posts in 654 days


#27 posted 04-04-2013 12:03 AM

I don’t know, how would you attach it to the arbor? This thing has no provisions to mount to a shaft. I’ve seen what you guys are talking about, the ones I’ve seen had a more aggressive thread.

-- http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v655/aaronhero/

View scotsman9's profile

scotsman9

134 posts in 640 days


#28 posted 04-04-2013 12:08 AM

It’s an iron workers Tapping tool.
They would make these then smash them into poorly drilled bolt points, crank a few time until the bolt fit.

Sorry about the poor terminology on the OP.

-- Just a man and his opinion.

View Airspeed's profile

Airspeed

425 posts in 654 days


#29 posted 04-04-2013 12:13 AM

A taper tap? Is that what it sounds like, a tap for tapered holes? Not doubting you but wouldn’t it have cuts like a regular tap or am I misunderstanding the term? What are tapered threaded holes used for?

-- http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v655/aaronhero/

View scotsman9's profile

scotsman9

134 posts in 640 days


#30 posted 04-04-2013 12:20 AM

^fixed it^

-- Just a man and his opinion.

View Larry's profile

Larry

22 posts in 1438 days


#31 posted 04-04-2013 12:27 AM

I work in natural gas distribution and that is what we call a nugent pin, it is used to plug a hole in a gas pipe (or water I guess}, you drive it and screw it in a small hole in a gas main and once tight you can weld around it and cut off the excess. If memory serves me correctly what appears to be threads are only ridges running around the pin. When all gas mains were steel we used them a lot for leak repair, has a gas company vehicle been in your driveway lately?

View RonInOhio's profile

RonInOhio

720 posts in 1616 days


#32 posted 04-04-2013 12:29 AM

Looks like some kind of jet to control flow. Other guesses. Some type of reamer or a universal bolt designed to fit in a variety of diametered steel holes ?

View Airspeed's profile

Airspeed

425 posts in 654 days


#33 posted 04-04-2013 12:37 AM

ljhhontx, now that kinda makes sense, when I read that I remembered the local water company replaced the water main on my street, the gas main is in the same ditch, maybe it fell of one of their trucks or came out of the ditch when they dug it up. So far you get my vote! Now when did uncle Ted have time to invent this? Was it before Stranglehold?

-- http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v655/aaronhero/

View Larry's profile

Larry

22 posts in 1438 days


#34 posted 04-04-2013 12:51 AM

While I have a fondness of Uncle Ted also, I have a feeling these were in use way before he was a glint in his daddy’s eye. We loved those pins until plastic gas pipe was invented and we had to try inserting the plastic inside the old lines at times, nugent pins became a curse word pretty quick when they stopped you from pushing the pipe or worse yet you got it installed and in pressure testing you realized you had damaged the pipe by pulling it past one.

View hokieman's profile

hokieman

166 posts in 2505 days


#35 posted 04-04-2013 01:18 AM

It looks like something that was used in the refining and chemical industry many years ago called a tapered plug. We used to screw that plug into a leaking heat exchanger tube innthe exchanger tube sheet to plug off the leaker and button the exchanger tube back up and keep running. It isn’t used as much any more, though. That’s my guess.

View scotsman9's profile

scotsman9

134 posts in 640 days


#36 posted 04-04-2013 01:18 AM

I’m in no way disagreeing here, but I thought Nugent pins had two separating parts?

-- Just a man and his opinion.

View Larry's profile

Larry

22 posts in 1438 days


#37 posted 04-04-2013 01:34 AM

I believe I have heard of them called tapered plugs in some circles, where the term nugent pin came from I have no idea, sounds like the same thing you used in the refinery for about the same purpose. The proper term probably is tapered plug since I found out that Google has never heard of that term, maybe we had an old timer back in the day named Nugent that had a fondness for them, lol. Here is a link to tapered plugs from a supplier, seems as if they are really threaded, only thing I see different is ours come to a real point, http://www.usaindustries.com/THREADED_TAPERED_PLUGS.php

View Airspeed's profile

Airspeed

425 posts in 654 days


#38 posted 04-04-2013 02:30 AM

Well from now on I’ll refer to it as a Nugent plug! No doubt what it is now! Thanks, you solved a many year mystery! Now look at the black wickerbill with the red plastic tip and identify that sucker! I’ve had it longer than the Nugent Plug and have asked on numerous forums with no luck. I’ve been given suggestions such as the ever classic anal insertion device to fake lipstick but no one knows for sure! Thanks again!

-- http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v655/aaronhero/

View Loren's profile

Loren

7826 posts in 2399 days


#39 posted 04-04-2013 02:37 AM

View Airspeed's profile

Airspeed

425 posts in 654 days


#40 posted 04-04-2013 02:52 AM

Not bad! The best part was he had an entire conversation with only two words, BUTT PLUG!

-- http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v655/aaronhero/

View Maxinep's profile

Maxinep

1 post in 632 days


#41 posted 04-04-2013 03:14 AM

I have a tool quite similar to that. It’s used for removing a piece of pipe that has broken off in a fitting.
Can you tell which way the threads go? Mine has “reverse” (or left hand) threads. used to use it quite often back in the days before copper and plastic pipe.

-- Max in El Paso

View Airspeed's profile

Airspeed

425 posts in 654 days


#42 posted 04-04-2013 03:18 AM

Hi maxinep, the mystery was solved by ljhhontx, it’s a plug to repair holes in gas lines. He has a link to the description in his comment. Thanks!

-- http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v655/aaronhero/

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