LumberJocks

All Replies on Wall hanging scotch cabinet - Introduction and design critique request

  • Advertise with us
View JeremyMorgan's profile

Wall hanging scotch cabinet - Introduction and design critique request

by JeremyMorgan
posted 514 days ago


38 replies so far

View paratrooper34's profile

paratrooper34

760 posts in 1547 days


#1 posted 514 days ago

Jeremy, that looks like it would turn out to be a fine cabinet. I like the idea of the spalted maple panels, I think it would be a good match for the mahogany. If your board for them is a bit too narrow, would you have the capability to book match them? Each side could be book matched which could add a nice touch.

Good Luck and be sure to post pics when you’re done.

-- Mike

View JeremyMorgan's profile

JeremyMorgan

58 posts in 515 days


#2 posted 514 days ago

That’s a good idea. The two sides of the board are very different but the two faces from the cut should match pretty well. I might have to try that out. I’ll post a picture if I am successful in resawing it, always an adventure without a bandsaw.

-- Jeremy Morgan, CO Front Range, http://lifeonwallst.blogspot.com/

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2163 posts in 1446 days


#3 posted 514 days ago

Seems well and good for function and use of materials.

I find the curves in the door frames inconsistent with the through box joints at the corners and the through tenons for the fixed shelf. The latter are craftsman-era and the curves seem to be Early American.

I don’t recall ever seeing through tenons from something one can’t see. Example: through tenons on a trestle table stretcher. The protruding end of the tenon lets the mind fill in some information about the stretcher.

The tenons sticking out the side of this cabinet are confusing to me.

These comments are meant to be helpful and constructive and are kindly offered.

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View ShaneA's profile

ShaneA

5242 posts in 1194 days


#4 posted 514 days ago

Well, it is G&G influenced for sure. I may be w/Lee on the through tenons. I like the rail and styles of the top two pics more than the last picture, but I would keep the pegs on doors. I really like the pegs in the G&G styled items.

View JeremyMorgan's profile

JeremyMorgan

58 posts in 515 days


#5 posted 514 days ago

Thanks for the responses.

The thru tenon for the shelf is something that I think isn’t going to make the final cut. I liked the idea of it but the comment about visible joinery for parts you can’t see makes sense. Would you guys suggest just going with a stopped dado for the shelf?

My main problem with the first door design is that I feel that the outer stiles are too thick. I am also concerned that unless I use very small pulls the two narrow center stiles might looked discontinuous. I may need to just make the cabinet a bit wider so that the proportions for the stiles work better. I like like the way the doors came out, but see your point about them not really working with the case.

What would you guys think about going with straight outer stiles and having the center stiles expansed in the center with more of a tsuba like design? I think I might try making the cloud lift pattern on the rails a bit more abrupt, smaller radius transitions to keep it from looking so much like a large curve.

I might not be explaining that very well, I don’t have a seat of the program used for this model here at home but I might use sketchup for a few quick door ideas, that seems to be what needs the most work.

Thanks again for the critiques and suggestions. Lee, I really appreciate someone who is able to explain what they don’t think works with a design.

Cheers,

-- Jeremy Morgan, CO Front Range, http://lifeonwallst.blogspot.com/

View ShaneA's profile

ShaneA

5242 posts in 1194 days


#6 posted 514 days ago

I usually make the stiles the same width, not that there is any reason than that is just what I have done. One thing may be to think about the cloud lift getting larger in the middle, rather than smaller, if that makes sense? That way the cloud raises into the panel vs recedes from it. If you were to have the cloud lift getting larger on the rails, and equal sized stiles, maybe your panel dimensions would then fit. Seems like you are well on your way to a nice design.

View JeremyMorgan's profile

JeremyMorgan

58 posts in 515 days


#7 posted 514 days ago

Here is another version of the doors. I thickened the top rail so that the thinner part matched the width of the stiles. I think only having the cloud lift at the top, instead of mirrored top and bottom works a bit better.

-- Jeremy Morgan, CO Front Range, http://lifeonwallst.blogspot.com/

View Mark Kornell's profile

Mark Kornell

471 posts in 1126 days


#8 posted 513 days ago

Jeremy,

Are you attempting to make a piece that is, for lack of a better term, “correct”? I.e. follows the details closely enough to perhaps mimic a piece that might have come out of the Hall bros. shop? Or design something that just takes influence from G&G designs?

My comments are geared toward the first interpretation rather than the second, so I apologize in advance if that’s not your intention.

I would suggest that your cloud lifts are somewhat out proportion – they lift too much. The double lift seems too much for the scale of the door – both the inner stiles and top rails. The proportion of the lift on the inner stiles of the third pic of your original post seems about right.

You can find the cloud lift going both ways on G&G furniture, although I’d hazard a guess that the lift opens up more often than down at the top of an element.

Do you have David Mathias’ book? If so, there is a picture of a small curio cabinet on page 23 that might be a good reference for you.

The cabinet has proportionally thinner stiles and top rail, with a thicker bottom rail. This rail is sized to cover a set of drawers in the cabinet. The cloud lift opens up on the top rail, and there is a double lift on the bottom rail that also opens up.

For the finger joints, you could go protruding, as you’ve drawn them, or you could go flush. In either case, the ends of the fingers are rounded over.

This curio cabinet uses protruding fingers on the top, but a flat bottom that extends a bit past the edge of the carcase, like something you’d see in a Krenov piece.

Also, through tenons are something that isn’t common in G&G furniture. Tenons were pinned, though, and the pins capped with square pillowed plugs. Mathias’ book shows only one example of a through tenon, and that was on a lower stretcher of a table. Shelves in carcases were just dadoed in.

A couple things to consider:
- Maybe use brackets rather than cloud lifts on the inside of the door frame. Top of the frame only. Given the scale of the doors, probably just a single bracket, rather than a double (Blacker-style) bracket.
- If you remove the through tenons for the interior shelf, maybe add some decorative raised inlay to the sides of the cabinet.
- Consider what you want to do for glass. G&G used a lot of art glass for the visual effect, and while it was by no means ubiquitous in glass-doored cabinets, it might be a nice touch to your piece. Though not cheap :-)

Darrell Peart’s book is also quite useful as both a reference on styles and variations, but also construction details.

-- Mark Kornell, Kornell Wood Design

View JeremyMorgan's profile

JeremyMorgan

58 posts in 515 days


#9 posted 513 days ago

Mark, thanks. I have Darrell Peart’s book on order as well as one from Lang. I’m not sure I quite follow your suggestions on the bracket? Could you point me to a picture that would show a similar detail?

My intentions are more to explore some of the design elements from G&G pieces rather to try and make something that might be seen as correct. I do appreciate feedback that is more in line with what would be appropriate on a true G&G style piece as the style intrigues me.

Here are a few more quick concepts, right now I think the first one is my leading contender. The wide portion of the center stiles would have the handles mounted, as this will be mounted on a wall I think it will make sense to have the handles biased toward the bottom.

Also took a break from working on a storm window project to re-saw the board I am thinking about using for the panels. Here are the two pieces in the orientation that I think I will use them.

-- Jeremy Morgan, CO Front Range, http://lifeonwallst.blogspot.com/

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2163 posts in 1446 days


#10 posted 513 days ago

Well that last picture points my eyes toward no details on the stiles and rails. That’s just to beautiful, in an exquisitely simple way, to introduce movement in the frame. Those panels look Krenovian.

Let the panels be the detail, that’s my thought.

Do another cabinet with the cloud lifts! I like both refinements above the above photograph.

Excellent discussion, and thank you, Jeremy, for being open to other ideas and opinions and interpretations.

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View Mark Kornell's profile

Mark Kornell

471 posts in 1126 days


#11 posted 513 days ago

I’m with Lee on that – that piece of wood looks like it wants to be the feature, and an attempt to add adornment via styling would detract. Maybe even use it without rails/stiles.

I like pic #1 – the proportions look “right” to me. But depending on the style of the pull, pic #2 might work better.

As far as brackets – Chapter 9 in Peart’s book is all about the style of double brackets found in the Blacker house. He shows how to construct a double bracket, but given the scale of the each door, I’d think a single bracket would look better. Peart gives templates for brackets, but the curves and proportions look a bit odd to me – refer to the picture of the chair on page 43 or the xray pic on page 51 and compare that to his templates to see what I’m talking about…

G&G used a couple of different styles of single brackets. Check out the Tichenor chair on p. 17 and compare that to the Robinson chair on p. 66.

Oh – the curio cabinet I mentioned is also pictured in Peart’s book on page 61.

-- Mark Kornell, Kornell Wood Design

View JeremyMorgan's profile

JeremyMorgan

58 posts in 515 days


#12 posted 512 days ago

I think you guys are right about those panels. They are not large enough to use as slab doors but I think they will look great in a simple frame door. I do plan to keep the plugs on the corners. Now I am struggling with the orientation of the those panels. My initial thought is to keep the larger blue streak to the outside, but they might look a bit better inverted from the way they are shown in that photo.

Mark, thanks for the references. I can’t wait until that book comes in.

-- Jeremy Morgan, CO Front Range, http://lifeonwallst.blogspot.com/

View JeremyMorgan's profile

JeremyMorgan

58 posts in 515 days


#13 posted 512 days ago

Here is an image of the new, simplified, design showing the spalted maple panels.

I like it, and I won’t have to fool around with any templates for this project. Now I just need to sort out the joinery design and finish off the couple projects that are ahead of this in the que.. I am getting sick of building storm windows but I just can’t bring myself to buy the damn things.

I am thinking a pegged bridle joint for the door frames. Anyone have any thoughts on that?

-- Jeremy Morgan, CO Front Range, http://lifeonwallst.blogspot.com/

View BTimmons's profile

BTimmons

2076 posts in 1081 days


#14 posted 512 days ago

I like that last iteration best. With such nice stock to work with, I like letting the wood do the talking.

-- Brian Timmons, Big T Woodworks - https://www.etsy.com/shop/BigTWW - http://vimeo.com/98821147

View Loren's profile

Loren

7223 posts in 2243 days


#15 posted 512 days ago

Bridle joints are nice, though inset they won’t be seen
easily. A cool variant is the dovetail slip joint.

I think it can be easy to overdo it on details and I
agree with the other posters who prefer the last
iteration.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View JeremyMorgan's profile

JeremyMorgan

58 posts in 515 days


#16 posted 512 days ago

Loren, can you point me to a picture of a dovetail slip joint?

Your comment about not being able to see the bridle joint with the doors being inset got me thinking about the mounting of the doors. I might see what it would look like with the doors overlapping the sides of the case which would allow the bridle joints to be exposed.

-- Jeremy Morgan, CO Front Range, http://lifeonwallst.blogspot.com/

View JeremyMorgan's profile

JeremyMorgan

58 posts in 515 days


#17 posted 495 days ago

Finally finished up the projects ahead of this one and am beginning to make some test pieces for the joinery. I am also working on figuring out the final details for the cabinet. Below is an image with the door rails/stiles corrected. I plan to cut all 4 stiles from a single piece and both pairs of rails as well.

I am pretty happy with the two different sized plugs on the doors. I don’t think that I like the way the 3/8” plugs look on the case. My plan has been to add screws to at least a few of the fingers and then square up the counter bore for the plugs. It looks like I would have to drop to a #3 screw to get a counter-bore to be 1/4”. At that size I doubt the screws will add much strength. I could skip the screws and just have the plugs be decorative or perhaps go to a 2/1 finger layout instead of the 3/2.

I have also been experimenting with some finishing options and am leaning toward danish oil sealed with shellac. The DO seems to give the wood a bit more depth and I think that the Shellac will be more than adequate protection for a wall hanging cabinet. I considered experimenting with dyes to try and get more of a classis Greene& Greene color but I think the lighter color will actually work better where this cabinet will go and I will save my experimentation for a project that doesn’t have two very different woods.

Far left is with the DO, Middle has an initial coat of amber shellac (too yellow) and the right is just plain shellac.

Any thoughts or suggestions? I am excited to get this project underway.

-- Jeremy Morgan, CO Front Range, http://lifeonwallst.blogspot.com/

View Mark Kornell's profile

Mark Kornell

471 posts in 1126 days


#18 posted 495 days ago

Hey, I was wondering when you were going to pick up this project again.

With the 3×2 finger layout, you will have plenty of glue surface to keep the carcase together, without using screws. Less glue surface on a 2/1 layout, so less strong. A well-fitted back will provide the support necessary to resist racking forces, so the only thing the fingers need to do is resist pulling out. You could pin with small dowels under the ebony plugs if you are really concerned about that.

if you really want screws, a #6 will fit under a 5/16” plug, which is what I did to secure the handle on the drawer front on this table:

The fingers at the drawers sides are neither screwed nor pinned. The (purely decorative) plugs on the drawer fingers are 1/4”. There are also non-pinned flush plugs on the sides of the fingers, which can’t be seen in this photo. The plugs at the apron rail and brackets are 3/16”.

I like the proportions on your piece, particularly with the middle split stile. There’d be too much stile if you’d gone for making the middle stiles the same width as the outer stiles.

I’m less enamoured with the middle stiles not going all the way to the bottom. Maybe just because its very unusual to see a frame designed that way. I’m assuming that you modelled it the more traditional way and decided you like this better?

It is very hard to tell the a color difference between the three areas in the pic. If you are looking to darken it up slightly, maybe try a garnet shellac, or tung oil under shellac.

How are you planning on finishing the spalted maple? Its more important the the mahogany work with the maple, rather than going for a specific color tone of the mahogany.

On a tangent, have you tried the Perspective camera view in Sketchup? It make the visuals look much more natural than the Parallel Projection view…

-- Mark Kornell, Kornell Wood Design

View JeremyMorgan's profile

JeremyMorgan

58 posts in 515 days


#19 posted 494 days ago

Mark, Thanks for the great feedback. That is good to know about the #6 screws. I think if I go with the 3×2 finger layout I will just do decorative plugs. I am not sure which finger style I like better. I am almost leaning toward the 2×1 layout as I think the sizing works better? Less plugs to make too. I plan on using some 1/4” spalted maple plywood for the back so I will be able to glue it all the way around, giving the case quite a bit more support.

One of my earlier iterations had the center stiles going full height. I like the way that the inset center stile almost gives the appearance of the doors being one, larger door. I considered just making a single door but the two smaller doors works better for the location that the cabinet will be mounted.

Speaking of mounting I am thinking that I will just space the back in a 1/2-3/4” and use a french cleat, seems like the easiest way to get a good sturdy mount without screwing through the cabinet.

The finish on the maple will be just DO and blonde shellac. I think I would rather error on the side of lighter than darker with the mahogany, particularly since I expect it to darken over time. I was impressed by how noticeable a change I got in just a few days in a sunny window.

I haven’t played around with Sketch-up too much. This model was done in Solidworks which I use at work. I have played around with sketchup a bit but it takes me easily twice as long to model anything.

-- Jeremy Morgan, CO Front Range, http://lifeonwallst.blogspot.com/

View Mark Kornell's profile

Mark Kornell

471 posts in 1126 days


#20 posted 494 days ago

Those images look so much like something Sketchup outputs, I was convinced it was Sketchup. Solidworks is awesome, though. You could analyze the stresses on the finger joints from a fully stocked cabinet and determine if you need screws, pins or no reinforcement. :-)

For the finger joints, I kind of prefer the look of the 2/1 layout, with the middle finger being slightly wider than the other 2. Less busy.

If you think that needs reinforcement, a 1/4” pin through the 2 outside fingers using something strong would probably be sufficient. The pin wouldn’t have to be wood – aluminum or brass would work. But realistically, any wood stronger than mahogany will do. If there’s enough shear force to break a couple of 1/4” oak pins, there’s going to be failure in the mahogany also.

Where are you obtaining spalted maple plywood? I want to get me some of that! If you glue that all around in a rabbet in the back, you’ll have a very solid carcase, no finger joint reinforcement needed.

A french cleat works well, probably your best choice for a strong yet invisible mount as long as the extra depth needed doesn’t mess up your design. There are commercial hardware bits available that do the same thing but in a much thinner profile if the depth is a concern.

To get the #6 screws to fit under a 5/16” plug, I did not use a standard counterbore drill setup, as a #6 counterbore leaves a hole slightly too large. Instead, I ground the tip of a 5/16” twist drill bit to match the angle of the bottom of a screw and used that to make the counterbore, drilling the pilot hole for the screw first. In hindsight, a panhead #6 with a counterbore via a brad point might have been easier and just as effective.

There were 72 plugs on that table I did. Once I got into a rhythm, it took “only” 20 minutes per plug. That was starting with drilling the hole and finishing with gluing in the square plug. I can understand not wanting to do any more than necessary…

-- Mark Kornell, Kornell Wood Design

View JeremyMorgan's profile

JeremyMorgan

58 posts in 515 days


#21 posted 494 days ago

I think I am going to go ahead with with 3 finger design with 3/8” plugs on the fingers and door corners, 1/4” plugs on the rest of the door. After I glue up the case Ill decide if it needs reinforcement, but I suspect that I am overly concerned…precious cargo and all. It did cross my mind to try and run an FEA analysis on the joint (I’m not sure being an engineer is beneficial to my woodworking)...but decided that it would take more time than just adding the pins if I were that worried about it.

Do you have any suggestions on cutting the square holes? I have looked at the Lee Valley square hole punches and thought about just picking up some cheap mortising machine chisels.

I think the door hardware is my last piece of the puzzle. Knife hinges would be nice but I think I might go with something a bit easier to install, and cheaper to buy.

The spalted maple plywood (Veneered MDF panels really for the 1/4” size) is from a hardwood dealer here in denver.

I have some left over from a built in window seat project. It was great for the door panels as it is a true 1/4” so I was able to use standard cope/stick bits. I was also able to get knotty alder 3/4” combo core for the cases, really nice stuff to work with as far as plywood goes.

-- Jeremy Morgan, CO Front Range, http://lifeonwallst.blogspot.com/

View Mark Kornell's profile

Mark Kornell

471 posts in 1126 days


#22 posted 494 days ago

Square holes: the LV square hole punches would work well. You can modify a mortising machine chisel to do the same thing. I used the bench and mortise chisels I already had. The key to that is laying out the squares accurately, and then drilling a 1/32” undersize hole dead center. Squaring the hole with hand tools is pretty easy as you’re only going in about 1/4” – no mallet needed, just hand pressure.

Hinges:
According to David Mathias, G&G used stacked butt hinges quite often, in an arrangement almost like a piano hinge. He also noted that they used piano hinges only on pianos. See page 5 in http://www.popularwoodworking.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/0811GnGSlides.pdf

-- Mark Kornell, Kornell Wood Design

View JeremyMorgan's profile

JeremyMorgan

58 posts in 515 days


#23 posted 493 days ago

I picked up several mortising chisels yesterday from Rockler, they actually sell just the chisel w/o the bit and a cheap wooden handle to turn then into a hand tool. Tried them out on my test board and cut up the Ebony. First try came out pretty decent. I got a little tear out from the twist drills I used. I think I might try scoring the layout lines before I drill to prevent that.

Drew up a quick plan to work from in the shop. I am thinking about possibly inlaying some Ebony in place of actual pulls. I plan to use a magnetic catch that when the doors are pushed in a little will spring out. This will allow me to cut a small recess on the back edge of the inner stiles.

-- Jeremy Morgan, CO Front Range, http://lifeonwallst.blogspot.com/

View Mark Kornell's profile

Mark Kornell

471 posts in 1126 days


#24 posted 491 days ago

How did you pillow your ebony plug?

-- Mark Kornell, Kornell Wood Design

View JeremyMorgan's profile

JeremyMorgan

58 posts in 515 days


#25 posted 491 days ago

I used sandpaper placed over a folded up rag to cushion it and prevent facets. Worked pretty well. I just drew circle with the ebony “stick”.

-- Jeremy Morgan, CO Front Range, http://lifeonwallst.blogspot.com/

View Mark Kornell's profile

Mark Kornell

471 posts in 1126 days


#26 posted 491 days ago

Those look like they came out pretty well. If you have a buffing wheel, try buffing them before you cut them off – the ebony takes a nice glow.

-- Mark Kornell, Kornell Wood Design

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

1236 posts in 1004 days


#27 posted 491 days ago

I am thinking why hide the bottle of Scotch, why not show it off? Maybe glass doors instead?? Unless the purpose is to HIDE the Scotch which then would change this to a Stealth Scotch cabinet. That would make me offer a suggestion of a hidden cabinet cleverly disguised as something else. No, I am not sharing in a public forum where and how I hid the liquor, kinda defeats the purpose ya know? (laughing)

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View JeremyMorgan's profile

JeremyMorgan

58 posts in 515 days


#28 posted 490 days ago

Got some time in the shop this weekend and was able to get all of the case parts machined. Pleased with the results so far. Still have to do all the surface prep on the parts before I glue them up.

I was pleased with the first attempt. I don’t have a buffing wheel but we have one at work. Might have to take the little plugs into work with me and spiff them up over lunch.

The cabinet won’t be disguised per say, but it won’t actually have any handles one it. You will have to know the trick to be able to open it up and sample its goodness. Next question is what bottle should I get to christen it. I have been slacking off in the Scotch dept. and am down to the tail end of a couple bottles.

-- Jeremy Morgan, CO Front Range, http://lifeonwallst.blogspot.com/

View Mark Kornell's profile

Mark Kornell

471 posts in 1126 days


#29 posted 490 days ago

You need a bit of leverage to hold the plugs to the buffing wheel. I had to buff the end before I cut it off the stock. Pretty hard to hold when its only 3/16” thick :-)

May I suggest the Abelour A’bunadh.

The proportions look nice on that pic. They’d probably look even better after a couple of fingers…

-- Mark Kornell, Kornell Wood Design

View JeremyMorgan's profile

JeremyMorgan

58 posts in 515 days


#30 posted 490 days ago

An interesting sounding bottle. I will have to keep my eye out for it.

I am liking the proportions too. Sometimes it just works out perfectly. The height was dictated by the space required for my tallest glass and for a bottle and the width was driven by the width of the two maple panels that I am going to use for the doors.

-- Jeremy Morgan, CO Front Range, http://lifeonwallst.blogspot.com/

View JeremyMorgan's profile

JeremyMorgan

58 posts in 515 days


#31 posted 486 days ago

Quick update for anyone who is interested. Got the case glued up and started working on the door parts.

I’ve got some more pictures up on my blogspot page if your curious…link is in my signature. Thanks again for all the great suggestions and encouragement. Now that this project is well under way I have started throwing around ome designs for the next one, that’s for another thread I think.

-- Jeremy Morgan, CO Front Range, http://lifeonwallst.blogspot.com/

View JeremyMorgan's profile

JeremyMorgan

58 posts in 515 days


#32 posted 474 days ago

If any of you guys are still watching this post I would be interested to hear your feedback on the following options for the placement of the door pulls.

Option 1, the pulls are in-line with the small plugs on the center stiles.

Option 2, they are moved inward toward each other.

Option 3, both pulls are mounted close to the edge of the door so that they appear as one pull when the doors are closed.

Here is an end view of the plugs to show the slight taper I put on them, I would also be interested to hear your suggestions on mounting these little pulls. I forgot about them and have already put a coat of danish oil on the wood so glueing them on directly isn’t going to work. I have thought about drilling small holes into the pulls and doors and using toothpicks as tiny dowels. The other way I can think to do it would be to mark around them with a knife and chisel out a shallow mortise for them to sit into.

Cheers.

-- Jeremy Morgan, CO Front Range, http://lifeonwallst.blogspot.com/

View Mark Kornell's profile

Mark Kornell

471 posts in 1126 days


#33 posted 474 days ago

Those doors are awesome. The simple spalting in the maple really shows nicely in the frame.

I kind of like option 3, but thinking that it might be hard to open the door even with the bevel on the pulls. Or maybe that’s the point…

Depending on how deep the oil has penetrated, you could just sand it out under where the pulls would be glued.

-- Mark Kornell, Kornell Wood Design

View JeremyMorgan's profile

JeremyMorgan

58 posts in 515 days


#34 posted 474 days ago

Yeah, I am really happy with how the doors turned out. I am leaning toward the last option. I did a test piece earlier this evening using a round toothpick as a mini dowel which seemed to work pretty well, just used some CA to glue them in place.

As far as opening the doors, the magnetic catch will actually pop them out when you push on them so if you know the trick it should be pretty easy ;).

Got the plugs cut and installed for the case tonight as well. Working with them two at time i got it down to about 10min per 2 plugs. I should have done the case ones first since they are less visible than the ones on the doors :).

-- Jeremy Morgan, CO Front Range, http://lifeonwallst.blogspot.com/

View JeremyMorgan's profile

JeremyMorgan

58 posts in 515 days


#35 posted 473 days ago

I posted some pictures showing the process that I used to make the Ebony plugs if anyone is interested. Once I got into a rhythm it went pretty quick and would have been even quicker if I were doing more than two at a time.

http://lifeonwallst.blogspot.com/2013/04/making-ebony-plugs.html

-- Jeremy Morgan, CO Front Range, http://lifeonwallst.blogspot.com/

View BTimmons's profile

BTimmons

2076 posts in 1081 days


#36 posted 473 days ago

Been watching this one quietly for a while. It’s fun to see it coming along.

-- Brian Timmons, Big T Woodworks - https://www.etsy.com/shop/BigTWW - http://vimeo.com/98821147

View Mark Kornell's profile

Mark Kornell

471 posts in 1126 days


#37 posted 472 days ago

I guess now’s probably not the time to tell you how I did mine :-)

I used a core box bit to rout a small depression in a block of wood. I picked the bit size to match the desired curve on the plug. Secure the block in a vise.

Chuck the square piece of ebony in my cordless drill (kind of weird, as drill chucks have 3 jaws, the ebony rod has 4 sides).

Lay a piece of coarse sandpaper (80 grit) over the depression in the block. Drill the ebony into the depression. As the ebony gums up the sandpaper real fast, I pulled the sandpaper along as the ebony was sanding. Then repeat, using finer grits of sandpaper – up to 400 or 600 grit. Buff on the grinder. Cut off the end and repeat. Took about 90 seconds per.

-- Mark Kornell, Kornell Wood Design

View JeremyMorgan's profile

JeremyMorgan

58 posts in 515 days


#38 posted 468 days ago

Finally got this cabinet finished up. Posted some pictures on my blog and in the projects section Click for details

-- Jeremy Morgan, CO Front Range, http://lifeonwallst.blogspot.com/

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase