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Is it possible to get a set of wood exterior french doors made in jamb for under $1000?

by Jacqueline
posted 02-07-2013 04:58 PM


35 replies so far

View BRAVOGOLFTANGO's profile

BRAVOGOLFTANGO

271 posts in 750 days


#1 posted 02-07-2013 05:18 PM

To answer your subject line which is very generalized, yes it’s possible, at least in my area there are several door vendors with prices in that range for french doors.

Their bread-winner or money maker doors are the inlaid glass, double paneled, inert gas filled type solid entry doors, that’s their big bread winners for residential.

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

15450 posts in 1085 days


#2 posted 02-07-2013 05:26 PM

Should be able to find what you want. It may take some time and getting many bids, but someone out there needs work.

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it.

View dannelson's profile

dannelson

151 posts in 1118 days


#3 posted 02-07-2013 05:28 PM

seems cheap at 1000 theres alot to go into exterior french doors .weather proofing /air and water tight. hinges to stand the test of time. thresholds, sweeps ect Interior maybe Id guess your getting quotes at $1600 to $2000

-- nelson woodcrafters

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Jacqueline

14 posts in 1186 days


#4 posted 02-07-2013 05:57 PM

BGT, name, number, website? I’m willing to buy out of state and go pick up for a good price. I need 10 sets (3 interior/ 7 exterior) and 1 set of french casement windows that is essentially a shortened version of the same set (the kickplate would be eliminated).
Monte, Is there a place on this forum to ask for bids or is that prohibited? Maybe I just missed it.
Dannelson, All over the place but quite high…

Thanks guys. Inviting more info till I find someone who does want to do it:)...

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madts

1298 posts in 1087 days


#5 posted 02-07-2013 08:17 PM

You have not mentioned quality or any other specs. Try going to Anderson windows and see what they have. I know they are upper end, but that will give you and idea. I use them a lot and get no bad feed-back

-- Thor and Odin are still the greatest of Gods.

View levan's profile

levan

427 posts in 1726 days


#6 posted 02-07-2013 08:58 PM

You might try www.custommade.com

-- "If you think you can do a thing or think you can't do a thing, you're right". Henry Ford

View kdc68's profile

kdc68

2071 posts in 1024 days


#7 posted 02-07-2013 10:41 PM

What you are asking for is custom (ie. true divided lights). Custom is at a premium price usually. Perhaps you may get lucky because you want so many made that you can get the price range under a $1000 per

-- Measure "at least" twice and cut once

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wncguy

227 posts in 1059 days


#8 posted 02-08-2013 12:47 AM

Where are you located? I know of one person you may want to contact if reasonable distance.

-- Any man can be a father, but it takes someone special to be a Dad

View TCCcabinetmaker's profile

TCCcabinetmaker

925 posts in 1102 days


#9 posted 02-08-2013 12:59 AM

Your location would not hurt, there are several of us who can make these types of things, but it would be hard to say wether or not we are close enough.

-- The mark of a good carpenter is not how few mistakes he makes, but rather how well he fixes them.

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Jacqueline

14 posts in 1186 days


#10 posted 02-08-2013 03:03 PM

I’ll check that out Levan. I’m in Virginia (23110) and could possibly pick up! Thanks!

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Jacqueline

14 posts in 1186 days


#11 posted 02-08-2013 04:29 PM

Just an update. I did post the project on Custom Made. We’ll see how that goes- I’m not quite sure how to post a link to it, unfortunately. They have a video telling more but with the internet speed I am getting in my beloved boonies on this rainy day, that’s not gonna work for me.

View wncguy's profile

wncguy

227 posts in 1059 days


#12 posted 02-11-2013 02:24 PM

If the Asheville NC area isn’t too far for you, I can give you contact info on a guy that did wonderful work for us & our clients when we had our Architectural Salvage business. Let me know.

-- Any man can be a father, but it takes someone special to be a Dad

View Jacqueline's profile

Jacqueline

14 posts in 1186 days


#13 posted 02-12-2013 04:22 PM

Oh man, I replied to this and must have hit preview instead of post- sorry for the delay! Asheville is not too far at all- that would be great- thanks! If it would be easier for you or him, I could contact him if you’d prefer. Either way:).

View wncguy's profile

wncguy

227 posts in 1059 days


#14 posted 02-12-2013 06:14 PM

Jacqueline – I just sent you a private message with the information.

-- Any man can be a father, but it takes someone special to be a Dad

View Planeman40's profile

Planeman40

513 posts in 1508 days


#15 posted 02-12-2013 06:46 PM

I don’t know exactly what you have in mind, but you may want to try this if you have the capability to do some door hanging and trimming. I made up a beautiful set of glass-paned french doors for an outdoor entrance complete with two smaller side doors acting as full length windows. I went to a building surplus place and found what were new doors with glass pains from bottom to top. They obviously had holes drilled for the door locks in the wrong place and had been “surplused”. I filled the holes with automotive body putty (Bondo) and used a belt sander to sand the over-filled holes flush. I also found two more matching doors that were smaller in width and used them as side windows to the right and left of the french doors. The door have been up now for about six years and have held up beautifully. The Bondo filling has held up well with no visible cracks or shrinking/expanding in the paint over it. It does take some effort and thought to get the doors hung properly, but if you have some woodworking experience you should be able to do a good job with a minor bit of cursing.

Planeman

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

View Jacqueline's profile

Jacqueline

14 posts in 1186 days


#16 posted 02-14-2013 03:02 PM

THanks Planeman. I need so many and they need to match….and they are unique in that I only want horizontal muntins (I’ve only seen those in salvage places on the west coast) so that’s out for this situation.

I hope to hear back from WNCGuy’s contact and I’ve gotten some other requests for quotes out there. I priced materials (glass and all) and they are coming in at about $5000. So with my budget of $15,000 I would think a guy with the right tools could make a respectable profit from the job, especially since most of them are all the same. Once you set up, 80% of the job is just copies! Maybe I know too much for my own good. Maybe I’m a tightwad, but if I had the right tools and it was my trade, I could knock these out and make a nice profit doing it. Sorry for the rant. I’m starting to realize why so many people choose illegal laborers (not that I’m saying I would do that- I still wouldn’t). One of the quotes I got was for 90K. Really? I respect woodworking tremendously but at that price, I’m paying for someone’s beach house, and it ain’t mine.

View Francisco Luna's profile

Francisco Luna

936 posts in 2140 days


#17 posted 02-14-2013 03:11 PM

why dont you and your husband make them? You can hire a good guy to help in the making…...

I have worked for many shops doing this kind of doors and Architectural woodwork and sadly, what all them do, is to “wrap” MDF with all type of veneers, and make the client think they are getting “solid” stuff…...

-- Nature is my manifestation of God. I go to nature every day for inspiration in the day's work. I follow in building the principles which nature has used in its domain" Frank Lloyd Wright

View Jacqueline's profile

Jacqueline

14 posts in 1186 days


#18 posted 02-14-2013 03:21 PM

I’ve been seriously thinking about it for a long time. I bought an out of print book about it… in a nutshell my husband works really long hours, and I homeschool and will be general contracting (as an owner builder) the entire remodel (we’ve been doing everything ourselves every spare minute with every spare dime and have been living in a mess for three years—we’re finally getting a loan to finish it)... so I’m hesitant to take it on, especially with no experience…
You know… I didn’t think about just hiring a guy to help me though… that would change things a bit, now wouldn’t it.. hmmmm…..I’ll have to think about that one! Thanks for the idea!

View a1Jim's profile (online now)

a1Jim

112862 posts in 2324 days


#19 posted 02-14-2013 03:48 PM

As a long term contractor and woodshop owner I would be careful about hiring help. Over the years I’ve found that many people talk a good story when interviewing but they don’t really have the skills they say they do. If you end up with one of these type of workers they can destroy a few thousand dollars worth of material and tools before your realize they don’t know what there doing. There’s always the security issue too,not knowing there background. Just be very careful. I’ve been doing this for 25 years and have come to know the right questions to ask when hiring help. I always run a background check on who every I’m thinking of hiring. Good luck with your project.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Jacqueline's profile

Jacqueline

14 posts in 1186 days


#20 posted 02-14-2013 04:30 PM

I appreciate that. I do- about the lumber and being careful- it’s a good reminder. I had a terrible experience with a guy about 10 years ago (that was recommended to me by a friend- go figure), who threatened me. I think he actually attempted to break into our house at one point. He knew when my husband was gone. It was very scary. It’s why I now have a handgun. I don’t know how to run a background check on someone, but I’m sure I can find out pretty quickly. That’s a good idea. Thanks again.

View BorkBob's profile (online now)

BorkBob

71 posts in 1439 days


#21 posted 02-17-2013 02:02 AM

http://www.etodoors.com/shop/product/162

Is this the configuration you’re looking for? This company doesn’t show white oak (mahogany?? pictured) but Ii don’t see how you could get doors like this, prehung, made of white oak with non-standard heights and probably custon jambs (anything not 4-9/16”) for $1000. I’m retired and haven’t priced any doors for awhile but I’d guess the upcharges for each non-standard door would be $350-500 each.

Seven exterior doors like this is intense. The lock sets alone would buy a table saw. Is this an older home? I’ve not made any doors but I’ve hung a bunch of replacements and it’s pretty common to run into insect or water damage under the doors when removed.

I’m sorry to scare you or be a bummer but if cost is an issue, I’d explore alternatives to all those large openings.

-- Please Pray for Our Troops / Semper Fi / Bob Ross / www.theborkstore.com

View Jacqueline's profile

Jacqueline

14 posts in 1186 days


#22 posted 02-18-2013 03:06 PM

Happy to report I’ve gotten a couple of wonderful referrals from the great folks here at Lumberjocks! Needle-in-a-haystack type of folks, but that’s exactly what I was looking for…...

Thanks everybody! Jackie

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RockyMillWill

11 posts in 670 days


#23 posted 02-19-2013 12:24 PM

Connect with Wilson Lumber in Huntsville AL. Ordered lots of stuff through them.

-- "It's a poor craftsman who blames his tools."

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RockyMillWill

11 posts in 670 days


#24 posted 02-19-2013 12:24 PM

http://www.wilsonlumber.net

-- "It's a poor craftsman who blames his tools."

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TimberFramerBob

68 posts in 670 days


#25 posted 02-19-2013 01:55 PM

Id like to throw my two cents in on this. I have seen thuis scenario over and over again in my business. I agree with Jim 100% on this. Be very careful about who you hire. You quoted the material and said someone could make a handsome profit on the remainder of your budget. This is based on your knowledge of running a cabinet (or door making) business. I say this because this happens to me over and over in my business (I own a timber framiing company) and I wanted to let yo see the flip side of the coin. Many people come to me and explain if they had the time or the space they would do this themselves. Its a little insulting. Now….making doors and making a timber frame are different but both encompass a fine skill set to get the job done right. Making doors is a fine trade and there is more that goes into it for a long lasting professinal door than most people think. If you find a contrcator that is willing to make these doors on site there is a good chance he needs work and may lack the skills to do your job properly in a timely manner…..if at all. If you find someone with the proper skills and tools…..they probably have a shop. No one likes “paying for overhead”, but unfortunately 95% of the guys out there that need to pay for overhead also need to produce the quality of work that will sustain that overhead. For example…..does the contractor you are hiring to help you have insurance? You may think its not a big deal because its just doors, but if he cuts a finger off on your site working on your job…...you can get the bill AND get sued for that. Professionals have several kinds of insurance, licenses, are usually members of builders associations, etc. This all costs them money. I have great talent in my shop…..we are completely set up to make most anything out of wood…..if the material for your job was $5000 as you say leaving $10,000 left in your budget there is no way we could make those doors and turn a profit…..let alone pay for my beach house (which, consequently i dont have …lol) Now Im not saying YOU cant do this…...i think its awesome if you can…...just be cautious about who you hire to save a buck AND be realistic about your own skill set and the quality that you will accept for the finished product. Like many guys in here Ive seen this same thing over and over and over…...most ofthe time it doesnt work out well. You may find that “needle in a haystack” guy whos and awesome craftsman and works cheap…...but thats a tough find. A lot of us spent many years honing skills (that we continue to work on and polish) and usually dont like the notion of giving that away for ten bucks an hour. I apologize for the long winded response, but as I said….Ive seen this more times than I can count. I have a wooden plaque carved over the door to my shop that sums it up perfect….it reads: It’s unwise to pay too much, but it’s worse to pay too little. When you pay too much, you lose a little money—that is all. When you pay too little, you sometimes lose everything, because the thing you bought was incapable of doing the thing it was bought to do. The common law of business balance prohibits paying a little and getting a lot—it can’t be done. If you deal with the lowest bidder, it is well to add something for the risk you run, and if you do that you will have enough to pay for something better.There is hardly anything in the world that someone cannot make a little worse and sell a little cheaper, and the people who consider price alone are that person’s lawful prey.

Happy hunting

-- ..........a man who works with his hands, his brains, and his heart.....is an artist.

View Jacqueline's profile

Jacqueline

14 posts in 1186 days


#26 posted 02-20-2013 03:18 AM

Well Bob, I hear you. In a nutshell, I’d love to hire the best, have the best and get the best price. I realize that a large percentage of the people who advertise and hire employees have to cover more than an hourly rate and those who don’t need still deserve a livable wage. Obviously I have a restricted budget and cannot afford to pay without reserve whatever someone may rightly deserve. I have better taste than my budget would permit in many cases. However, may I submit to you an option C scenario that sheds a different light on all of those factors that you really didn’t cover here.

I don’t really fit either of the categories I think you are describing (high cost/high quality vs. low cost/low quality) and the person I was looking for doesn’t either. Instead of describing that person I’ll describe myself since I can speak fron a place of knowledge. If you knew me you may get this mystery category, but many people who do know me still don’t….because we are all different for good reason…. but here goes:

I don’t take vacations, I’d rather develop my homestead. I don’t buy nice clothes or shoes or jewelry, but I pay more for good quality food than most people who have a household income triple mine. I don’t send my kids to public or private school, I teach them myself. To do those three things alone has meant that we share a family car and I don’t go anywhere all week. Most people think that is like being in prison but I find it a small price to pay to enjoy what matters to me. I have health insurance but I don’t use doctors unless my vitals are failing or a bone is sticking out and needs set. I’m learning about natural remedies and healing and they work. My former church acquaintances constantly tell me that I need to go back to being in a building once a week to be more Christian, when I am closer to God now than I’ve ever been and so is my family. I’m starting my own business that has a woodworking component and I will be operating it out of my garage. Our family will do the work themselves and I do believe we will make enough for us and to share with others. In my belief, experience, and research- thanks in part to brilliant politicians and drones of their followers who trashed a better way of life to follow the illusion to what they thought would be a better way of life and left their homes and their farms in search of “more”- cottage industries- where a craftsman does what he loves with excellence, maintains a healthy family life, and finds his “enough”- is the last best hope of not only American businesses and farms, but people everywhere. It’s the way I personally believe we were designed to function.

And so I do sympathize with the predicament that many people find themselves in (the general standard operating procedures that this society almost demands), but I have fought like hell to find my way back to God’s good plan for me and I believe there are other people out there that have done the same thing. Amazingly, I can afford their products and their quality is awesome. It’s extremely difficult to find them, but they are well worth the hunt.

I don’t speak from a point of judgementalism- I used to be so tied up in the rat race that I couldn’t breathe. However now that I’m not in it I see that being in it doesn’t justify it as the only option (high prices, indebtedness, stress, slavery) with terrible quality and risk the only alternative. I’ve learned enough over the years through bad experiences alone to void the latter, and through personal work experiences to recognize when I am paying too much otherwise- whether it’s for someone’s lakehouse or just their burden from being part of the mainstream system. I really do empathize with that second group….really do. It’s painfully hard to wrestle out of it. Unfortunately I can’t afford to keep them in it either…...nor do I think it’s necessarily good for them. Many like it and do well in it. THat’s okay. It’s just different than me. But I know that there are people out there- cottage industry craftsmen with tools in their workshop and a solid grounding of where that sweet spot of “enough” is that we all must find. I want to give them my business to say that I vote for their choices. I want to give them my business because they need it. And I am very, very grateful that they are there because otherwise people with modest budgets like me (of their own choosing) could never have anything more than a plastic house in a crammed subdivision in keeping-up-with-the-Jones land.

I could go on and on about how God’s hand is so major in all of what I am describing but then I’d really be preaching up in here, now wouldn’t I? He sure is a great dad that gives good gifts to his children- well beyond what they could ask think or hope for…. you’d be amazed.

I have 5 sets of french casement windows sitting in my house that have never been used that I got for $20 a piece because one Friday night I was praying about needing a window for the bathroom. He knew exactly what I wanted and led me to a warehouse sale on Craigslist for the next day where low and behold…. in the back there sat the perfect size, not just for my bathroom but for my kitchen- horizontal only muntin french casement windows that would easily retail for $1800 a set….. so where do I go now when I am looking for something that defies conventional options? I ask my dad. And he leads me to people, sometimes through other people…. and that is how this went down right here on lumberjocks. I found a great guy who could do this for a great price because he works out of his house as a one man deal…. it was a perfect fit for me (my situation, what I believe, what I want to support, and answer to prayer:). I know most of society has replaced that process with a standard system, but in my life I have replaced that which has done the replacing with what was there originally and it is working out great for me. God is so very good.

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levan

427 posts in 1726 days


#27 posted 02-20-2013 03:11 PM

Amen Nice score

-- "If you think you can do a thing or think you can't do a thing, you're right". Henry Ford

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TimberFramerBob

68 posts in 670 days


#28 posted 02-20-2013 09:32 PM

Thanks for yor response. Believe me theres not a day goes by that I dont wish I could move into the woods, build a house and just trade my skills for others that I may need. I say it all the time, but like you said its hard to wrestle away from that. I apologize if I sounded surly, your scenario is obviously different then the ones I have dealt with. I just suppose I have a little sore spot for the folks out there who have money to burn and still try to reduce the price of our craft to pennies…...and a bigger little sore spot for the folks who come to my shop and tell me that the only reason they want to hire someone is because they dont have time to do it themselves…...and yes…lol…ive had more than one person come to me, with limited at best, carpentry experience and explain how they could cut their 3000 square foot timber frame home if they had the time. I love woodworking and I think true craftsman are a dying breed…..I strive everyday to learn and perfect what I do…..I even forego power tools on certain projects because I feel they take away from the true connection one can get by feeling the project take shape with your hands. I get defensive (as I assume many craftsman would) when I spent close to 20 years learning this craft (and still have an infinite amount to learn) , and someone insinuates they can just pick up a piece of wood and do my job…..no problem. I apologize again as I realize this is not you nor was it your intenton to sound that way. Its tough doing what you love and going the extra mile to set yourself apart, to give that little bit extra, and make sure you do everything the best you possibly can…...and in the end….you hear, ” OK….but this guy will do it cheaper” Thanks for sharing with me and letting me share too…...Ill stop now as most of the people reading this probably think both of us are nuts by now…...LOL. Happy wood working…..if you ever need anything feel free to reach out….:)

-- ..........a man who works with his hands, his brains, and his heart.....is an artist.

View TCCcabinetmaker's profile

TCCcabinetmaker

925 posts in 1102 days


#29 posted 02-20-2013 09:44 PM

Bob, I know you mean well, but I”m gonna burst some bubbles here….

Cost of Living affects prices far more than you know, it would be a reasonable amount of money for those doors where I’m at, however I’m simply too far to get these doors to her, I seriously thought about it, then I saw that she was 16 hours away, which is just impracticle with glass doors…

Now If I lived in a state with a higher cost of living such as california, the price would totally be out of the question.

-- The mark of a good carpenter is not how few mistakes he makes, but rather how well he fixes them.

View Jorge G.'s profile

Jorge G.

1526 posts in 1222 days


#30 posted 02-20-2013 10:05 PM

and someone insinuates they can just pick up a piece of wood and do my job…..no problem.

LOL…Bob you know that this is a common complaint we all have. If I had a nickel for every time I have heard “why is it so expensive?”, “I don’t understand, I just want it made of wood (as if it grew on trees). All you need is the wood and some nails/glue/screws”, etc. I would be a millionaire by now.

Which brings me to the question, if someone is hired, who is going to pay for the tools? Which by the way it is the answer to the “why is it so expensive?” question.

-- To surrender a dream leaves life as it is — and not as it could be.

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TimberFramerBob

68 posts in 670 days


#31 posted 02-21-2013 02:29 PM

TCC…..I am well aware of the cost of living affecting prices on things….no bubbles burst…..cost of living or not if someone carrys employees, workers comp insurance, liability insurance, has several different licenses, a large full time shop, etc…...its costs more than if someone is flying solo….with no insurance, no help and working out of their garage. IM NOT SAYING someone working in their garage cant make beautiful, perfect doors, cabinets, etc…..I now plenty of guys that are masters that work this way. The original point I was trying to make is it is safer to use the guy who has all the insurance and licenses, and employees…..the job will get done faster and if something were to go wrong the consumer has a better chance of getting money back or working things out, BUT that scenario costs more money…..it has to. Again, theres plenty of guys who do AWSOME woodwork….by themselves….with no employees….in their garage….and the can do the same work for less money and still turn a profit. The point im making is for every one awsome, accomplished, perfectionist, woodworker doing wonderful work for less money there are probably 5 guys that NEED work…..saying they can do the job….promising the world….taking a deposit…...trying to do the work…then realizing they are in over their head. Which brings me back t my original bit of advice to Jacqueline…..which was be careful who she hires…..not “pay through the nose” or “dont hire someone who works out of their garage”.....I simply said be careful…...choose wisely…..and while $90,000 for these doors is ridiculous…...$15,000 is low for 10 custom made, glass french doors…...7 of which (i think 7) are exterior. If she found someone to do it for that and he is a great wood worker…..I think thatis flat out awesome for everyone…....BUT sometimes deals like that dont work out…...sometimes they do…....

-- ..........a man who works with his hands, his brains, and his heart.....is an artist.

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TimberFramerBob

68 posts in 670 days


#32 posted 02-21-2013 02:50 PM

LOL…Jorge…..I get it all the time…..

-- ..........a man who works with his hands, his brains, and his heart.....is an artist.

View Jacqueline's profile

Jacqueline

14 posts in 1186 days


#33 posted 02-21-2013 02:53 PM

Hey Bob, Nooooooo worries- I’m the one who is sorry if I sounded surly. Tuesday I had a super long and stressful day, way out of the ordinary for me anymore (because I live in the woods- hehe) because I had to go into town and cram one thing after the other in, in city traffic with two kids, in the rain! (Then I had to do it again yesterday so I just now got back to my computer) Needless to say I should know better than to dump my life philosophy after a day like that on some unsuspecting guy who is just trying to help me out and defend his craft at the same time…...I’m the one who is sorry. Thanks for being so gracious- you could have handled that a whole lot differently and I appreciate that you went so easy on me:).

I do understand what you are saying and I do agree that it is a fine craft- not just something you whip out. I also realize that not everyone can go back to trade-to-trade living, and there is enough of a market of wealthy people to still pay fine craftmen what they need to make so that they can be in and meet that market… and I didn’t mean to imply you have to have an unbalanced family life to be a successful businessman and employee others while you’re at it. I was just trying to say that it is hard to find something in between the norm of really high end expensive options and buying stuff from China. Since I fall in between those two extremes and don’t like to be forced into one or the other…..I get really testy (like you do when someone implies what you do is easy) when someone even hints at implying I don’t have another choice… I know you didn’t really say that- you just said it’s often hard to find something in the middle. That can be true.

Shwew! I feel better. I was sort of worried all day yesterday when I was out that I made my new favorite group of people (now on par with the Keeping a Family Cow folks- that’s a huge compliment:) mad. All is well.

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TimberFramerBob

68 posts in 670 days


#34 posted 02-21-2013 03:30 PM

No worries…...I see your point completely…...and like i said….if I could hide in the woods and just make stuff out of wood and trade it for other things I’d be the first to pack up and move…lol. I say to my wife all the time that im so lucky to do something I LOVE to do for a living and support my family doing it…..im blessed…someone asked me once what I would do if I couldnt do woodworking to make a living…...I said “id do it for free”....theres guys that do this for a living because they love it and theres guys that just do it for a living…...theres a big difference.
Theres ALWAYS a middle ground….....sometimes its just harder to find :)

-- ..........a man who works with his hands, his brains, and his heart.....is an artist.

View Dan Krager's profile

Dan Krager

1730 posts in 981 days


#35 posted 02-27-2013 02:15 AM

Jacqueline,
I’m there with you in philosophy. I looked hard and long at your request and decided that distance was too big a factor. Now, if there is something I can ship…
DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com

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