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View Okiecat's profile

Spend my $1,000

by Okiecat
posted 01-21-2013 11:04 AM


1 2 next »
54 replies

54 replies so far

View Kreegan's profile

Kreegan

1452 posts in 890 days


#1 posted 01-21-2013 06:04 PM

Do you have tools like a circular saw, jig saw, drill, etc? A miter saw would most likely be a good choice, or a band saw. A planer is always useful. With a planer and a table saw, you can surface rough stock, so that’ll save you money.

View Tedstor's profile

Tedstor

1503 posts in 1376 days


#2 posted 01-21-2013 06:11 PM

A quality TS is a must.
With $500 left to spend, and a drill press already in the shop, I think you should consider the smaller power tools.
Router- The Craftsman Professional Model is a well-regarded fixed/plunge combo that is bargain-priced.
Random Orbital Sander
Jigsaw

And don’t forget about clamps. Order 3-4 pipe clamps, 3-4 F-clamps from Harbor Freight…..for starters.

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

3549 posts in 1557 days


#3 posted 01-21-2013 06:15 PM

1. Tablesaw. Ideally a contractors saw with a cast iron top. I like Jet.
2. Compound miter saw. This will help with everything from moulding to fine furniture. I like Dewalt.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View Michael Wilson's profile

Michael Wilson

587 posts in 1234 days


#4 posted 01-21-2013 06:19 PM

I’m still just starting out but I’ll chime in with Tedstor here. If it weren’t for my table saw I wouldn’t get anything done.

The Random Orbital sander is in my hand more than I expected. I’m also surprised how often I use my belt sander. It’s a handheld model, but sometimes I turn it upside down and clamp it to the workbench.

You won’t believe how many clamps you use. It really defies all logic.

But aside from those couple/few things I’d say stop, work with them on a few projects and see what you need.

I made the mistake of buying LOTS of small power tools that just serve as sawdust accumulation systems (my router and hand planer most notably.)

View kdc68's profile (online now)

kdc68

2068 posts in 1020 days


#5 posted 01-21-2013 06:23 PM

Okiecat – you may catch the fever (woodworking kind) and that $1000 will turn into much more $$.

-- Measure "at least" twice and cut once

View danoaz's profile

danoaz

181 posts in 914 days


#6 posted 01-21-2013 06:36 PM

Okiecat, you sound like me. Due to the economy I have had to change careers and woodworking sort of fell into place for me as something that I have all ways wanted to get into. My wife is on to me to do an outdoor bench for out backyard and so now I know what I am doing this spring. Your TS and drill press are good starts. I had a corded drill, but finally broke down and bought a Dewalt cordless drill from Home Depot for $100. If you start getting into the cordless stuff look at ALL of the things that they offer that work with the battery pack so that over time you can build up the tools you need. For instance, I have a corded skill saw that you might need for thin material curve cutting but they also have them in cordless models. I am limited in space so that of course becomes a huge factor in my work and maybe in yours too. I have also invested in large 48 inch clamps for the outdoor furniture projects. Regular bar clamps can be good but I bought some that have feet on them so they can sit on the workbench and you put things into them. Electric sheet pad hand sander is a must. A band saw is on my list only because I see myself doing a lot of tenons for joints connects and while you can do tenons all sorts of ways the band saw is faster and cleaner. I recently bought a router for rounding the edges of material on the furniture. You will find yourself using up money on other little do-dads like push blocks for your TS. Different blades, safety equipment. OH! Big thing for me was getting a dust collector. I got a 15 gallon Rigid (made in USA) Shop vac that blows and sucks materials. Got tired of sweeping and dusting. Sorry for the long post but hope this helps.

-- "Simplicity and repose are the qualities that measure the true value of any work of art." Frank LLoyd Wright

View LoydMoore's profile

LoydMoore

96 posts in 700 days


#7 posted 01-21-2013 06:42 PM

Set aside enough of that $1000 to buy beer for all of your buddies you are going to invite over to check out your new shop and first project.

-- Loyd, San Angelo, TX http:www.moorewoodenboxes.com

View Loren's profile

Loren

7821 posts in 2391 days


#8 posted 01-21-2013 06:53 PM

For outdoor furniture a band saw allows the simplified
ripping of 4×4 stock as well as cutting curves in
such stock.

A planer is nearly essential for furniture and cabinet
making. In many styles of outdoor furniture boards
do not need to be perfectly flattened or dimensioned
however.

If you buy used you get about double your money’s
worth.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View bygrace's profile

bygrace

140 posts in 713 days


#9 posted 01-21-2013 08:54 PM

I’m not nearly as experienced as most on this site, but I’ll give you my two cents worth and hope it helps. The two most used power tools I have in my shop are a Bosch 4100 table saw from Lowes.(about $600.-650.) and a Dewalt planer. I bought the TS to build a cedar fence around my house, and after adding an Incra miter 1000HD (measures to .10 degree) I am able to use for more intricate woodworking. For a contractor grade saw, I love it. Seems to have plenty of power and the fence is pretty good – and dont skimp when buyng a blade, you’ll regret it. I use the planer alot more than i thought I would. I couldn’t get along without it. The TS, planer, and Incra miter probably come out to close to $1000. And keep a patient, close eye on Craig’s list, picked up a great Delta drill press that way.

-- Andy, Waxahachie, Tx.

View Swyftfeet's profile

Swyftfeet

169 posts in 915 days


#10 posted 01-21-2013 09:26 PM

What I thought I needed:
1)Table Saw
2) Wood
3)Glue

Expanded to:
4)Jointer
5)Planer
6)Router
7)Drill Press
8)Band Saw
9)Couple clamps
10) hand Drill
11)more glue

What that turned into:
12) Better Layout Tools
13) GOOD Clamps
14) Cauls
15) Scrapers
16) Dowel Jig
17) Close to $300-400 router bits (Freud and Whitesides)
18) Router Table & Plate
19) Lotsa Pencils, Where do they go?
20) More Clamps?
21) Hand Planes (Bench, Block, and Shoulder)
22) Finishing Stuff
23) Lots of Project Ply and MDF for Jigs and templates
24) Drum Sander attachment for Drill Press
25) Brad Point Bits
26) Forstner Bits
27) Bench Chisels
28) Router Bushings
29) Sharpening System

all big iron bought off CL, probably in for over $4000

What I should have bought:
1) Local Adult woodworking 8 week class ($280)

So far I’ve made a blanket chest…. Shoot me now.

-- Brian

View Michael Wilson's profile

Michael Wilson

587 posts in 1234 days


#11 posted 01-21-2013 09:31 PM

heh. That’s what I did with my home machine shop. By my calculations I’ve made a $2800 cigar cutter.

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

5600 posts in 2119 days


#12 posted 01-21-2013 09:55 PM

A TS and router/router table would be my two top priorities. With good blades and router bits, that won’t leave much leftover, but I’d start eyeballing a planer soon if you use mainly lumber as opposed to sheet goods.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View Okiecat's profile

Okiecat

5 posts in 715 days


#13 posted 01-22-2013 12:08 AM

Thanks to everyone. Wow what a site, makes me feel at home. I do have some cordless stuff, and a few bar clamps. The one thing I can’t buy is time! I’m self employed and work all the time, at least it feels like it! I have a mid quality miter saw also. The router and the sander both sound like solid ideas.

-- Lynn, SW Ok

View GrandpaLen's profile

GrandpaLen

1586 posts in 1016 days


#14 posted 01-22-2013 12:38 AM

Lynn,

Welcome to LumberJocks , a world of advise, opinions, and experiences, all shared without judgement.

Knowing what I know now, with early onset C.O.P.D. I will suggest your tool purchases as follows;

1st – Tablesaw
1st – Dust Collection System

- and then -

2nd – the next sawdust making tool that best addresses the type of projects you will likely build.

In time you may dream of upgrading your DC System but you will never regret having the most efficient dust collector you can afford.

Work Safely and have Fun. – Grandpa Len.

-- Mother Nature should be proud of what you've done with her tree. - Len ...just north of a stone's throw from the oHIo, river that is, in So. Indiana.

View BLarge's profile

BLarge

157 posts in 1205 days


#15 posted 01-22-2013 01:12 AM

I’d buy a jointer and planer first… Why???.... Because you want flat, square uniform stock, because without that, every other tool is useless in a sense. You can do a lot of stuff with a jointer, planer and bandsaw… Heck, you can get all three if you play your cards right or 1,000k….

I could go into the need for many other tools, but I’d start there… You will be flattening, thicknessng, ripping and milling in no time brother!!!

View BLarge's profile

BLarge

157 posts in 1205 days


#16 posted 01-22-2013 01:15 AM

GrandaLen makes a great point, dust collection is important… My life improved greatly with a dust collector and big air filtration system… Safety first always… If you can’t afford dust collection, open some knows we’re a mask….

View toolie's profile

toolie

1773 posts in 1372 days


#17 posted 01-22-2013 01:32 AM

okiecat…...just watch out for that jet/powermatic trap. long on promise, short on delivery and overpriced, making for an extremely poor value. the 4512 is a great little saw, and with the application of a harbor freight”20% off any single item” coupon, it can be had for $400. dust collection is very important and grizzly provides a good value for new retail purchases. if you’re mechanically inclined, CL can present opportunities for outstanding values.

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

View MarkTheFiddler's profile

MarkTheFiddler

1907 posts in 932 days


#18 posted 01-22-2013 01:35 AM

And here we go. I don’t have a dust collection system yet so – I bought a couple of good respirators. That was after I used my lungs to collect all the MDF dust I was producing. That was a very bad night of coughing and hacking.

I’ll buy into the safety first concerns.

I saw the exact same Rigid today. I’ts a very hard choice between the $600 bosch at Lowe’s or the $500 Rigid for portable saws. Both of them have extraordinary fences. The Rigid seems to grant a little more cutting width. The bosch seems to have the edge on durability.

I’d also follow Len’s advice. Buy what you need for the upcoming projects. If you buy a little bitty miter saw, you’ll outgrow it really fast.

Keep your eye on Craig’s list but check with the guys here first. They saved me from a painful mistake today.

-- Thanks for all the lessons!

View MarkTheFiddler's profile

MarkTheFiddler

1907 posts in 932 days


#19 posted 01-22-2013 01:36 AM

Toolie! You can use HF coupons at HD? Cool!

-- Thanks for all the lessons!

View John's profile

John

341 posts in 2541 days


#20 posted 01-22-2013 01:51 AM

+1 to the jointer and planer next, for a bit over your $500 you could get a G0725 & G0505 from grizzly

-- John - Central PA - http://affyx.wordpress.com

View rockom's profile

rockom

134 posts in 2614 days


#21 posted 01-22-2013 02:21 AM

Lynn,

After various hand tools (drills, hand saw, sanders, jig/saber saw, ect….) I got my tools in this order. It was not planned. It’s just how it happened.

1. Drill Press
2. Circular Saw with straight edge
3. Miter Saw
4. Band Saw
5. Table Saw
6. Router
7. Biscuit Joiner
8. 6” Jointer
9. 13” Planer

I did plenty with these tools in this order. I made outdoor projects, shelves, tool cabinets, even a small 12’ fishing boat. Keep in mind I collected these over several years. Looking back, I’m happy with the order in which my collection grew. Only thing I would have changed is the ability to them all at once!!

note: Cordless drills are great but a good corded drill is nice when drilling lots of holes. They are pretty cheap too.

-Rocko

-- -> Malta, IL -<

View Danpaddles's profile

Danpaddles

540 posts in 1055 days


#22 posted 01-22-2013 02:50 AM

Hi Lynn- welcome. Yup, table saw. Yup, used if you can afford the luxury of waiting for the right stuff to pop up. A planer is good. Keep some bucks back for a hand plane or two. A work bench and tool box. Clamps, as discussed.

Decide what projects you like, that will dictate further tool choice. Either case goods, or tables, or jewelry boxes. Or maybe turnings, or scroll work.

Get a few good layout tools, a combination square is a good start.

As for the time to do this- I like evenings, instead of watching TV, I try to spend an hour or two in the shop. Now that I am not working outside, my limit is feet- too much time on them, and those dogs get to barking up a storm.

Have fun with it!

-- Dan V. in Indy

View crank49's profile

crank49

3504 posts in 1714 days


#23 posted 01-22-2013 03:04 AM

Craig’s List is your friend.
I’ve seen deals on CL that defy all logic. But, never when I have any money.
It’s possible to get a cast iron, 3 hp, Delta Uni or Powermatic cabinet saw for $500. Thats about 1/6th of retail.
I missed a great 14” Delta band saw for $150.
Jointers frequently sell for $150 to $200, planers for $100.
Then don’t forget quality layout tools, like a good Starrett combination square.
And, of course, some good clamps.

Then, I couldn’t work without hand planes. I have known people who buy a plane, try to use it right out of the box and when they only get tear out and gouges in their project they stick it on a shelf and that’s that. Please believe me, if you read a little about how planes are supposed to be used, do the propper sharpening and honing and tuning, you will be amazed at what these tools can do. And, you can pick up a restored classic Stanley for $35 to $50. A good pair to start out with would be a low angle block and a #4 smoother or a #5 jack. At an absolute minimum get the block. If you really get the bug you might sell the jointer and planer you got on CL and stock up on a dozen or more hand planes.

-- Michael :-{| “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” ― A H

View Rick M.'s profile

Rick M.

4467 posts in 1124 days


#24 posted 01-22-2013 09:36 AM

I would not buy that Rigid, it looks like a table saw but it’s really an upside down circular saw; those things are made for carpentry not woodworking. If $500 is your saw budget you’d be far better off spending it on a band saw.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View toolie's profile

toolie

1773 posts in 1372 days


#25 posted 01-22-2013 12:58 PM

You can use HF coupons at HD? Cool!

i’m not sure that it’s company policy, but i’ve done it many times. seems to vary by store and by manager on duty. sometimes, i’ve had to contact corporate CS and they’ve instructed the MOD to accept the coupon.

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

View toolie's profile

toolie

1773 posts in 1372 days


#26 posted 01-22-2013 01:02 PM

I would not buy that Rigid, it looks like a table saw but it’s really an upside down circular saw; those things are made for carpentry not woodworking. If $500 is your saw budget you’d be far better off spending it on a band saw.

couldn’t disagree with this statement more. the 4512, as long as it isn’t one with the misaligned arbor issue, set up properly with the right blade for the intended operation, is more than capable of woodworking.

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

View Rick M.'s profile

Rick M.

4467 posts in 1124 days


#27 posted 01-22-2013 06:56 PM

I understand the Rigid does have it’s fans but nevertheless it’s a circular saw motor (and not a particularly powerful one -13 amp) in a saw known to have alignment issues and a mediocre fence designed for carpentry work and not precision woodworking. Universal motors are much louder and have a shorter lifespan. It’s not a bad saw for what it is but any new saw in that price range is going to be have serious trade offs. I once read about a Mexican who built beautiful furniture using a saw built from pallets and a washing machine motor but who wants to do that? You can spend $500 on a saw that you’ll want to upgrade in a few years or spend the same on a band saw that will last for life. I know the temptation to buy a cheap saw, like many others I went through it but decided to save money for another year and buy something that has served me well for over a decade and will for a long time to come.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View thedude50's profile

thedude50

3529 posts in 1221 days


#28 posted 01-22-2013 07:18 PM

A planer should be next

-- when I am not on Lumberjocks I am on @ http://thisoldworkshop.com where we allow free speech

View toolie's profile

toolie

1773 posts in 1372 days


#29 posted 01-22-2013 07:41 PM

rick m…..... i guess we’ll just have to agree to disagree. your opinion notwithstanding, though, the motor on the 4512 is a dual voltage induction motor (please see page 9 of link 1) , not a universal motor (please see second link info):

http://www.ridgid.com/ASSETS/CB27F0BEEDF448869119700F03E13946/R4512_988_03_EN_ES.pdf

http://www.ridgid.com/Tools/10-Cast-Iron-Table-Saw/

perhaps prior to expressing opinions about tools, it might be a good idea to get the facts straight first.

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

View TerryDowning's profile

TerryDowning

1024 posts in 861 days


#30 posted 01-22-2013 07:52 PM

You don’t mention the amount of shop/storage space available
If space is an issue.

Here’s a small phrase for you.

“Used Shopsmith (510 or 520) on craigslist.”
Search “shopsmith” or “Shop Smith”” on your local craiglist.

Depending on what’s availaable in your area, you could end up with the following

As a minimum
Decent 10” Table Saw
Good Lathe
Good drill press
Horizontal boring system
12” disc sander with adjustable table and movable quill.
All this fits in a 2 ft x 6 ft space.

Special Purpose Tools (SPTs) Also available (sometimes included with used systems, especially bandsaws and jointers)
11” Bandsaw with 6” resaw capacity
Planer
4” Jointer
Belt sander
strip sander
scroll saw
strip sander

all variable speed (Except the jointer/planer)

Here’s an example http://oklahomacity.craigslist.org/tls/3524874714.html This is a Shopsmith 510 with a bandsaw
There are others as well.

You’ll hear complaints about Shopsmith (Most have never used one). Shopsmith is at least as good as mid grade statioary tools. True the table saw can’t be compared to a Unisaw or other high end cabinet saw, but it can definitely hang with any contractor saw out there once setup and aligned properly.
check out some of the work done by Gene Howe, 8Iowa, or shipwright here on LJ

Shopsmith’s are still fully supported by the manufacturer. I can still get parts and upgrades for my 1955 model from the manufacturer. (How many other tools can boast that?)

-- - Terry

View MT_Stringer's profile

MT_Stringer

2100 posts in 1975 days


#31 posted 01-22-2013 08:12 PM

With a good table saw, you can make a lot of stuff to take up your spare time! With some plywood and scrap lumber, you can make a table saw sled to aid in cross cutting boards. You would like it.

A router, jig saw and orbital sander will allow you to cut curvy stuff up to about an inch thick. Sand it with the orbital sander and route the edge with the router.

A lot of projects can be built with just those few tools.

A circular saw would be great for cutting plywood sheets into smaller, more manageable size. A simple guide helps make accurate rips or cross cuts.

The internet is packed with a lot of information and YouTube is great for watching how others do it.
Good luck.
Mike
Edit: Don’t forget to buy a good blade= for the table saw. I am using an Irwin Marples blade and it makes smooth rips and cross cuts. Same for the circular saw. I have a Freud Diablo thin kerf blade and it works great.

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

View Rick M.'s profile

Rick M.

4467 posts in 1124 days


#32 posted 01-23-2013 02:25 AM

perhaps prior to expressing opinions about tools, it might be a good idea to get the facts straight first.

I stand corrected on the induction motor point. 13 amp induction so that’s about 3/4 HP. However my other points were spot on. It’s fair for him to know that there are serious trade-offs with the Rigid saw.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View FeralVermonter's profile

FeralVermonter

100 posts in 715 days


#33 posted 01-23-2013 02:34 AM

Quite the rookie myself. So far, though, I’ve only had to buy one saw blade, a few brass brushes, a couple of wire wheels, some evapo-rust, and a whole bunch of WD-40. I’ve gone sweat-equity the whole way, partly out of personal inclination, partly due to being broke. $1000’s a fortune! You can do SO MUCH with that!

I’m not even being sarcastic. Well… maybe only a little.

My best advice, one rookie (on a tight budget) to another? Go slow. Do your due diligence. Research. And ask for advice whenever you can, as much as you can, because ten minutes with someone who knows what they’re doing will save you a whole night of research. But then research that. Because there’s another expert who has an entirely different technique for doing the same thing, and that one might work better for you. In the end, really understanding what you’re doing is going to carry you a lot further than any tool, or any shop’s worth of tools, for that matter.

So I can’t really tell you what to spend your money on, but I can share a few of my thoughts and experiences in equipping my shop on a very small budget. First off: restoring old beat-up tools is a freakin’ hassle, takes forever, you have to do more reading than you ever imagined… but when you’re done, jeez, you feel like a little machine god, and most importantly, you understand the thing through and through. You know those stories, about the old-timer who could fix anything with duct-tape, spit, and curses? It’s because he understands what he’s working on. And it’s not just fixing: if all you ever do with tool is what it says on the box, you’re missing out on the possibilities and you’re missing out on getting the absolute most out of the machine.

Second, if you’re anything like me, your imagination can get away from you, and you find yourself wanting to buy tools that you don’t even know how to use, or what they’re for… keep your feet on the ground, and concentrate on what’s in front of you. Know where you’re at.

Third: always read the safety instructions. Look up any unfamiliar words. Read them again. Chant them, under your breath, as you use your new TS/BS/RAS.

If for now you’re just interested in outdoor furniture and shop benches for now, you might want to consider a radial arm saw. They can be had cheap as hell (I see them for $50 on Craigslist all the time) and they can do A LOT. They’re tricky machines, though. Tricky, in my opinion, because modern consumers don’t want to have to learn, they just want to “plug and play.” If you’re willing to learn, though, you can achieve the functionality of a whole host of machines for $50 bucks, and some sweat equity. And you’ll learn a heck of a lot about machines working on one of those things. But my point here is not to recommend the RAS, so much as to point out that there’s a lot of ways to skin a cat, when it comes to making things out of wood, so don’t get locked in to one equipment route or another.

People built stuff out of wood for a long, long time without a table saw. Heck, they used to do it with sharp rocks.

View Okiecat's profile

Okiecat

5 posts in 715 days


#34 posted 01-23-2013 04:15 AM

Lots of great info, looks like I found a rigid 4511 for $300

-- Lynn, SW Ok

View jeff's profile

jeff

687 posts in 2208 days


#35 posted 01-23-2013 05:12 AM

table saw,jointer and dust collection…actually i think a dust collection system should be purchased first or included in your first initial purchases…it makes shop time more enjoyable…

-- Jeff,Tucson,Az.

View crank49's profile

crank49

3504 posts in 1714 days


#36 posted 01-23-2013 06:22 AM

Rick said,”I stand corrected on the induction motor point. 13 amp induction so that’s about 3/4 HP.”

Sorry, better do a little more reading. 13 amps @ 120volts is very close to 1 3/4 hp on an induction motor.

Don’t get me wrong, I’m no fan of these saws, I have the original Craftsman version, Model 21833, complete with the alignment issue. BUT, other than the fact that I don’t think these saws will last forever like a big PM or Uni, they absolutely are real saws. 265 lbs, cast iron table, and nice smooth operation, and I think a pretty good fence. I don’t have any problem with the table, the fence. the motor, the riving knife, the dust collection or the casters. I think it’s the most bang for the buck you can get for under $500 in a new saw. But, you can get way more value in the used market.

I have made a couple of furniture pieces and several shop projects like a big heavy wotkbench, a lathe bench, some cabinets. The saw is fine as long as I allow for the alignment issue.

-- Michael :-{| “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” ― A H

View Rick M.'s profile

Rick M.

4467 posts in 1124 days


#37 posted 01-23-2013 06:38 AM

Sorry, I don’t believe the 1 3/4 HP claim. Not even close.

edit: I think you better do a little more reading, it’s not 1 3/4 HP and I can find nothing official that claims anything other than 13 amps. If it were 1 3/4 HP Rigid would be marketing the hell out of that but you have to know there is a reason they claim amps and not HP.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View crank49's profile

crank49

3504 posts in 1714 days


#38 posted 01-23-2013 08:12 AM

This is right out of the online specs for the Craftsman 21833, same as the Ridgid 4512.

•Kit Includes: 10 in. blade, blade guard, dust chute, extension rails, miter gauge, rip fence and anti-kickback pawl •Powered by a potent 1-3/4 HP, 3450 RPM motor
The Craftsman Professional Saw features a heavy-duty, cast-iron table with stamp steel extension and sturdy stamp steel stand
•Dual locking fence adjusts easily for solid cuts
•Blade guard system with anti-kickback pawl is designed with a quick release mechanism for easy removal and replacement
•Riving knife system used on this saw can be set at three different positions for versatility
•Blade tilts to the left from 0 to 45 degrees to permit cutting long bevel rips on wide boards
•Blade supported by a cast iron trunnion system for accuracy and consistent cutting performance
•Heavy-duty dual castor system is easily set with the front and rear foot pedals
•The saw includes storage for all of the accessories
•10 degree left tilt arbor gives greater flexibility when cutting bevels and miters
•T-square fence with front and rear lock keeps cuts even
•Weight: 265 lbs.

Of course, advertizied claims for horsepower mean virtually nothing when referring to universal motors, but induction motors is a whole different story.

Besides, why do you think it’s less than claimed? Did you ever use one.?

I use mine all the time. I think mine has way more than 2 horsepower.
Now, because I said that does that make it true?

Bottom line, I know it has an induction motor because I am an engineer and I know about such things.
I also know it will pull in excess of 15 amps in a heavy load situation, like ripping 8/4 oak, because I have checked it with a meter..

-- Michael :-{| “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” ― A H

View rodneyh's profile

rodneyh

128 posts in 1408 days


#39 posted 01-23-2013 09:10 AM

After the table saw, the only right tool is whatever is required for the project you want to make NOW. Also, every major tool in my shop with the exception of my table saw was purchased on craigslist. You can get some really amazing deals. Expect to pay half of retail for tools in really good (nearly new) condition. Many of mine were bought at 1/4 – 1/3 retail. Your $1000 can go quite a ways if you’re patient.

View Rick M.'s profile

Rick M.

4467 posts in 1124 days


#40 posted 01-23-2013 11:58 PM

Wait, you’re an engineer and arguing it’s a 1 3/4 HP motor? That claim is maximum developed. Please define that for everyone before continuing your argument.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View crank49's profile

crank49

3504 posts in 1714 days


#41 posted 01-24-2013 01:26 AM

It’s really pretty simple.
Look it up if you want to.

I should point out here that the Craftsman saw’s motor is rated at 15 amps while the Ridgid’s motor is rated at 13 amps. This has been pointed out in reviews here on LJ many times.

Rick, I don’t know where you got the term “maximum developed” from. I checked a couple of links to the Ridgid web site and I don’t find that term used except when they are talking about their shop vacuums. Maybe you are thinking about their job site saw which does have a universal motor.

The facts:
Watts = volts x amps.
So, 15 amps x 120 volts = 1800 watts
One horsepower = 746 watts
So, 1800 watts / 746 = 2.41 HP

Now those numbers are actual conversions right out of the text book.
In the real world, we must deal with a little thing called efficiency.
According to NEMA (the National Electric Manufacurer’s Association) the minimum electrical efficiency for induction motors in the 1 to 4 hp range is 78%.

So, the 2.41 hp x .78 = 1.87 hp.
The numbers for the Ridgid would be 2.09 hp max and 1.63 hp at 78%.

I try to be helpful whenenever I can, even to folks who don’t appreciate it.
This is all I am going to say about this point because we have gotten entirely off the topic of the OP.

-- Michael :-{| “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” ― A H

View BroncoBrian's profile

BroncoBrian

76 posts in 702 days


#42 posted 01-24-2013 01:47 AM

Brian – i would have sold you a blanket chest for less than $4000!

I am a gear guy as well. isn’t is a manly garage now? Worth it…..

-- Stop thinking, let things happen... and be the ball.

View Rick M.'s profile

Rick M.

4467 posts in 1124 days


#43 posted 01-24-2013 01:50 AM

You’re being obtuse. Left side, halfway down.

http://www.sears.com/craftsman-professional-10-in-contractor-saw-sears-21833/p-00921833000P

And I hope that comment about being helpful isn’t directed at me.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View toolie's profile

toolie

1773 posts in 1372 days


#44 posted 01-24-2013 03:16 PM

this was fairly enlightening:

http://www.mechreps.com/PDF/MRI_Formulas_Conversions.pdf

the formula for converting amps to hp is in there (hp = (V x A x Efficiency x Power factor)/746). there’s also a chart of hp, voltages and motor full load amp ratings. single phase 230v , 6.9 amps is 3/4hp. i trust this number since my former unisaw’s motor was 16A @ 220v and 3 hp, almost exactly what’s shown in the same chart for 3 hp.

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

View toolie's profile

toolie

1773 posts in 1372 days


#45 posted 01-24-2013 03:18 PM

okiecat….you ever close on that 4511? that’d literally be a cabinet saw for $300. assuming good condition, a gloatable deal. so what happened?

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

View BacktotheWood's profile

BacktotheWood

105 posts in 1765 days


#46 posted 01-24-2013 05:43 PM

Terrific advice about good tools, but I forgot, were we supposed to actually make something? I’ve just been having a ball buying used tools from CL and fixing them up.

Seriously, buying used from CL saves a ton of money, especially if you can tune up small problems yourself.
Good luck.

-- Bob, --Silence & smile are two powerful tools. Smile is the way to solve many problems & Silence is the way to avoid many problems.

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

5600 posts in 2119 days


#47 posted 01-24-2013 09:27 PM

”I would not buy that Rigid, it looks like a table saw but it’s really an upside down circular saw; those things are made for carpentry not woodworking.”

Come on now…do you have the wrong saw in mind? It’s no Unisaw, but that’s a lot of saw for the money, as new saws go….

Here’s a saw that looks like a circular saw upside down in a cabinet….I’m not seeing the similarities:

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View Wiltjason's profile

Wiltjason

56 posts in 706 days


#48 posted 01-24-2013 10:04 PM

Wow, all that schooling have me a headache! Personally for me if it weren’t for my planner and jointer I couldn’t afford to build any projects, being able to buy wood in the rough is defiantly cheaper ,. Having a nice powermatic table saw or a unisaw is nice buy their are plenty of guys on here that make beautiful project with cheaper contractor saws, I would think about what your wanting to build then think of what you might need for that project

View Okiecat's profile

Okiecat

5 posts in 715 days


#49 posted 01-27-2013 02:45 AM

Well I guess the guy with the saw is not going to call me back! I’ve sent this dude emails and text wanting a time and directions for two days. Now it’s been four days and no reply. I can’t figure this out. Day one I told him I wanted it. Well enough, time to move on. Back to looking for a bargain. Tempted to just go to HD and get it!!!

-- Lynn, SW Ok

View MarkTheFiddler's profile

MarkTheFiddler

1907 posts in 932 days


#50 posted 01-27-2013 02:58 AM

Sorry about that Okiecat. That just means there is a better bargain around the corner. Good luck!

-- Thanks for all the lessons!

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