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All Replies on Trouble Cross-Cutting 1.5 thick maple

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View Preserved's profile

Trouble Cross-Cutting 1.5 thick maple

by Preserved
posted 585 days ago


20 replies so far

View mbs's profile

mbs

1435 posts in 1567 days


#1 posted 585 days ago

Can you clean it up with a plane with a very sharp iron? or an edge sander?

I think a router bit would be worse.

I have cleaned up end grain with a jointer too. Very, very light pass, very slow feed rate and tape the end so you don’t get tear out. If you’re going to round the corners you can do it first and not worry about tear out.

Not sure if it’s your blade, saw or setup. A saw with some vibration will do that even with a good blade. I don’t think my festool would be perfect but I’m sure it would be better than the results you’re showing.

-- Sorry the reply is so long. I didn't have time to write a short reply.

View David's profile

David

196 posts in 1290 days


#2 posted 585 days ago

I would use a router with a straight bit, I just recently built a desk with a similar top and that’s what I did. Cut a little from the end before doing the main pass (careful you’ll be climb cutting) and you should be able to minimize the tear out.

-- Perilous to all of us are the devices of an art deeper than we ourselves possess. --Gandalf the Grey http://davidwahl.org/category/woodworking/

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112011 posts in 2204 days


#3 posted 585 days ago

Yes you can clean up the cut with a router,as with any end grain router trimming I always start at the right and do a climb cut for 6” or so to prevent blow out and then router from left to right taking very light cuts using a guide

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View David's profile

David

196 posts in 1290 days


#4 posted 585 days ago

^ Jim explained it better, but that’s exactly what I was saying.

-- Perilous to all of us are the devices of an art deeper than we ourselves possess. --Gandalf the Grey http://davidwahl.org/category/woodworking/

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112011 posts in 2204 days


#5 posted 585 days ago

Seems we were typing at the same time David thought you explaniaion was fine.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Wdwerker's profile

Wdwerker

332 posts in 860 days


#6 posted 585 days ago

Use a straight edge and score a line all the way around the top with a razor knife, then route it like Jim and David said. The score will prevent any chip out and give you a target to route to. Take very tiny amounts off at a time. Keep the bit clean, built up resin causes heat , dullness and burns.

-- Fine Custom Woodwork since 1978

View Cosmicsniper's profile

Cosmicsniper

2199 posts in 1786 days


#7 posted 585 days ago

Do exactly what Jim said.

-- jay, www.allaboutastro.com

View SamuraiSaw's profile

SamuraiSaw

447 posts in 591 days


#8 posted 585 days ago

Using a spiral cut bit will also help….........

-- Artisan Woodworks of Texas.... www.awwtx.com

View Preserved's profile

Preserved

11 posts in 618 days


#9 posted 585 days ago

Thanks guys!
I had to look up what a “climb cut” was!
http://www.waterfront-woods.com/Articles/Climb-Chip-Cutting.html

I’ve used a router this way before, didn’t know it was called a climb cut. Since I’m taking so little material off, this should be easy to control.

Wdwerker- scoring with a razor seems like a great idea too!

I’ve got at at least 4 inches to cut off (planer sniped ends) so I can practice before I get to the real cut.

View Preserved's profile

Preserved

11 posts in 618 days


#10 posted 585 days ago

I just looked up spiral cut bits, they are expensive! I don’t have one!

View Jay20650's profile

Jay20650

39 posts in 1318 days


#11 posted 584 days ago

the spiral bit is worth every penny though! it’s like the diffence between using a dull hand plane straight on on the end grain vs. using a really sharp skewed block plane.

-- Jay, http://www.facebook.com/porcupinedesigns

View dbray45's profile

dbray45

2488 posts in 1404 days


#12 posted 584 days ago

You have to be careful with spiral bits – easy to be seriously aggressive when you least expect it. If you are just cleaning up the edges, I would use a low angle plane set for a fine a shaving as possible. It is better to take ten really fine passes than one that looks like crap.

Using a router the same way – small cuts, but I would create some sample pieces to play with and get the “Feel” of what and how your router will behave on your wood. This may take you longer but it is far better than turning your counter into firewood.

-- David in Damascus, MD

View Preserved's profile

Preserved

11 posts in 618 days


#13 posted 584 days ago

David,

Any tricks with the low angle plane? I have one, and love using it..but in cased like these I find that I end up with something other than a 90 corner between the two planes. My sides end up not vertical. Perhaps I just don’t have the eye for it.

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

1173 posts in 924 days


#14 posted 584 days ago

To address the blade issue – a 40 tooth blade is not intended to make nice clean cross cuts. Ok for house framing, but maple butcher block I’d say not.

View Preserved's profile

Preserved

11 posts in 618 days


#15 posted 584 days ago

Thanks for all the replies. What a cool thing this forum is. I ask a question, and within hours I get multiple expert responses! How did I get along 10 years ago?

Thanks! Looking forward to trying these suggestions.

View John Ormsby's profile

John Ormsby

1278 posts in 2364 days


#16 posted 584 days ago

Make sure you use a spiral bit in the router to prevent chip out and chatter.

-- Oldworld, Fair Oaks, Ca

View MT_Stringer's profile

MT_Stringer

1832 posts in 1858 days


#17 posted 584 days ago

I made a similar table top and cut it to width and length using a circular saw with a Diablo blade. It made smooth cuts that only required light sanding.

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

View MonteCristo's profile

MonteCristo

2094 posts in 815 days


#18 posted 584 days ago

Your first link says that ToolBarn blade is $150. Wow ! I have never heard of a portable circular saw blade that cost that much. Even then, I would put down masking tape to prevent splintering on the top side, something these saws love to do because of the way the blade rotates. Also, end grain maple is damn hard so I would use a good quality router bit (eg CMT) – not all straight bits are created equal. The CMT ones have a shearing action because the cutting edge is not oriented dead vertically.

-- Dwight - "Free legal advice available - contact Dewey, Cheetam & Howe""

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

906 posts in 652 days


#19 posted 584 days ago

I like Tenryu blades for crosscutting. They do a beautiful job. Pricey, but not as bad as that Dewalt. I bought a used Delta RAS (one of the old ones with the swiveling turret), and it came with a new Tenryu blade. It makes the silkiest crosscuts I have ever seen.

View Preserved's profile

Preserved

11 posts in 618 days


#20 posted 584 days ago

MonteCristo, that’s for a package of 10. I just bought one at HD. No way I’d pay $150 for a dewalt blade!

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