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View pashley's profile

Finished with Finishing

by pashley
posted 12-23-2012 03:59 AM


42 replies so far

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

116566 posts in 3412 days


#1 posted 12-23-2012 04:09 AM

Do you go through the all of the sand paper grits a step at a time?

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View pashley's profile

pashley

1043 posts in 3553 days


#2 posted 12-23-2012 04:17 AM

Typically, 150, then 220, that’s it.

-- Have a blessed day! http://newmissionworkshop.com

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

116566 posts in 3412 days


#3 posted 12-23-2012 04:26 AM

That’s why it’s taking so long. Depending on how rough the wood is start at 80 or 100grit and then all of the other grits
120,150,180 . I usually don’t go past 150 or 180. Just for the record the finer you sand the less stain will penetrate into the wood . I know you may think going through each grit will take longer but it doesn’t ,it’s quicker.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View RogerM's profile

RogerM

786 posts in 2234 days


#4 posted 12-23-2012 04:36 AM

Pashley – Most good finishes is an art in itself and can best be achieved through experience. As you have already found out, they also take some time. You might start out with getting a good book on finishing (I am currently away from the shop or I could give you some that I have found to be useful. It sounds like you are probably preparing the raw wood OK. After sanding the raw wood I apply either a stain or a dye depending on the wood and the effect I am trying to achieve. After this, I usually rag on a coat of Seal Coat thinned with equal parts of alcohol. After letting this dry a few hours rub it down with 00 steel wool or 600 grit sandpaper (very light on the sandpaper). Remove the dust and rub with a tack cloth then begin applying (I often us a rag) successive coats of polyurethane thinned with equal parts of mineral spirits. You can apply these coats every two hours in most environments. Humidity and cold temperatures adversely affects these drying times considerably. I generally apply at least three coats but more can be applied until the desired sheen is achieved. Let these coats dry at least 8 hours and rub down with 00 steel wool or 800 to 1000 grit sandpaper. Apply finishing wax with 0000 steel wool and buff. I hope this helps. Send me a message if I can be of further assistance.

On the issue of Sander and sandpaper I mostly use the new low profile Porter Cable ROS with Klingspore Stearate Sandpaper discs.

-- Roger M, Aiken, SC

View Joe Lyddon's profile

Joe Lyddon

9979 posts in 3887 days


#5 posted 12-23-2012 05:40 AM

The American Woodshop recently played a program… the last one of season 18… where he made an heirloom Clock.

He had a Finishing expert demonstrate the way he finishes most of the time…

1. Spray HVLP light seal coat of shellac 1 lb cut primarily on the hard to paint areas… curved molding, curved areas, where joints meet, end grain, etc.

2. Spray Colored Shellac changing to 2 lb cut… 3-4 light coats.

3. Top-Coat of clear Exterior 450 which is good for interior as well… Satin…

He swears by it… and likes the Exterior 450 very much and has very good luck with it.

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

View Cosmicsniper's profile

Cosmicsniper

2202 posts in 2994 days


#6 posted 12-23-2012 05:57 AM

Why is the sanding taking so long? Are your tools leaving severe marks? That’s really the only reason for sanding. Some planers and most jointers leave chatter marks when surfacing a board, but that’s the first place I’d start – finding a way to improve performance with those tools. Then, I’d learn to use smoothing/black planes and card scrapers, if you don’t already.

As Jim said, if you use sandpaper, start at 80 grit. I’d finish to only 120 grit and would begin applying my finish right at that point. I like to apply a washcoat of dewaxed shellac firstt…lightly sanding to a smoother 220 grit or more here. This is the key to faster finishing…shellac dries really fast. And then, like Joe said, I’m a big proponent of delivering my color within the finish, not as a stain (which sometimes I do, before the washcoat, if I want the figure to pop first). The dewaxed shellac is great with TransTint dyes for coloring wood. After a couple of color coats (more coats when I want to sneak up on a color or darkness level) I then finish with a water-borne poly. Regular poly, lacquer, or shellac is sometimes used as well.

-- jay, www.allaboutastro.com

View bobasaurus's profile

bobasaurus

3353 posts in 3019 days


#7 posted 12-23-2012 06:09 AM

Becoming proficient with hand planing and scraping will greatly reduce the amount of sanding you have to do on flats, though the curves are still annoying (an oscillating spindle sander helps). If you have a decently good surface right off the tool, you can start sanding at a relatively high grit, like 120 or 150, then walk through to about 220 before finishing. If the wood is very course/torn/uneven and impossible to hand plane, start at 60 or 80 grit instead. Be diligent about walking through each grit to remove scratch patterns efficiently.

Finishing is always lengthy process. If I want speed, I’ll use a wipe-on polyurethane so I can apply new coats every 2-3 hours, though the wiping process can be time consuming for large projects. I hear HVLP spraying finishes is quick, but the setup and cleanup overhead is there too.

-- Allen, Colorado (Instagram @bobasaurus_woodworking)

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

5461 posts in 2648 days


#8 posted 12-23-2012 06:30 AM

I think Jim is on to something. Start with a coarser grit. Although if I don’t have any surface defects (tearout) I will start with 120 grit. Then I finish up with 150 grit. On sample boards I have made, the only difference noted with 220 grit was the stain came out slightly lighter in color. That was the only difference.
Also brands of sandpaper make a huge difference. Freud and Klingspor make the most durable hook and look ROS disks. They can sand effectively for 45 minutes per disk. Compare that to 10-15 minutes with the standard yellow Norton disks (not the Norton 3X – that product is pretty good). As far as dry times – spraying lacquer is hard to beat. You can spray two coats of lacquer on a large project in half a day. My final recommendation – do as Tommy MacDonald does… get an Ely to sand your projects.
We could all use an Ely.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View Arminius's profile

Arminius

304 posts in 3639 days


#9 posted 12-23-2012 11:39 AM

I’m with bobasaurus – I absolutely hate sanding. On many of my projects now, I don’t. I started using hand planes to minimize sanding and found it was actually much quicker on most woods once I knew what I was doing. Even if isn’t, an hour of sanding is torture, an hour of work with a sharp hand plane is about the most enjoyable stage of the project.

View paratrooper34's profile

paratrooper34

915 posts in 2787 days


#10 posted 12-23-2012 12:40 PM

I am with the hand plane camp; hand planing with a smoother prior to assembly and touch ups with a card scraper will relegate sanding to a rare occurrence. Most of my projects never see any sandpaper. The last times I used it was to ease edges that I didn’t take care of with my block plane. I hate sanding and I am glad I have a way that allows me to go without.

For finishing, I haven’t used anything other than an oil finish and wax for quite a while now. I like how wood looks (guess that’s why I do this) and I don’t like to alter its appearance with stains and polys, and whatever else is put on. I use tung oil or boiled linseed oil and then rub wax on. That method of finishing is exactly what I like. The wood retains its color (BLO will add a little color) yet grain patterns are enhanced and highlighted. Plus, it is an easy application. Obviously if you are making stuff for others you don’t have a lot of options with that outside of their wishes, but maybe you could try it out on your own projects and see if it fits your bill.

When I first started making stuff, I felt I had to stain everything and then cover it with poly or shellac and I found it is just a PITA and simply unnecessary! Now all I do is brush on oil, wipe it down after 30 minutes or so, let it dry, then rub some wax on. Done.

-- Mike

View RussellAP's profile

RussellAP

3103 posts in 2122 days


#11 posted 12-23-2012 01:26 PM

People say I’m nuts, but I start with 40g on hardwood to get the patina, scratches, and anything else off. Then you get the most from the 80, 120, 150, 180, 220.
Apply finish then sand with 320.
Another top coat, sand with 600.
wipe with 1200g after its finished.

There is no way around it.

And don’t use BLO unless you want to ruin a project. That stuff ruins every piece of wood I’ve used it on. Might as well use motor oil.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

View paratrooper34's profile

paratrooper34

915 posts in 2787 days


#12 posted 12-23-2012 01:52 PM

BLO has been used for centuries. Seems to me if it is on the same par as motor oil, someone would have figured out an awful long time ago that it is not a worthy finish. Yet it is still a viable finish. Ruins wood? The box you see below is finished in the fashion I described above. It is very old chestnut and you know, it doesn’t look even remotely ruined. In fact, it looks pretty decent. Maybe it is just me, but if it looks ruined, please tell me so.

The proof is in the end product.

-- Mike

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tyskkvinna

1310 posts in 2821 days


#13 posted 12-23-2012 01:56 PM

This also may sound silly, but start with new sandpaper too. I do this fairly often – I’ll keep using the same sanding disk through the whole project and it starts to go slower and slower and slower. Just not something I think of a lot. Put a brand new one in and whooosh, I’m done!

-- Lis - Michigan - http://www.missmooseart.com - https://www.etsy.com/people/lisbokt

View RussellAP's profile

RussellAP

3103 posts in 2122 days


#14 posted 12-23-2012 01:56 PM

Mike, I’ve restored a few planes and under the advise of many I used BLO on the handle and knob. They turned into dark wood with no grain and looked so horrible I had to refinish the entire thing. Danish oil made them look great. BLO is a good additive, but I’d never risk it again.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

View Gshepherd's profile

Gshepherd

1727 posts in 2037 days


#15 posted 12-23-2012 02:29 PM

Finishing for me at one time used to be a horrible experience as well. You spend many countless hours on a project to only mess it up in the end. You look for the easiest and quickest way to finish only to be dissapointed even more cause the easiest and quickest is not the best.

I realized that if went into the finishing process with the same attituude as I did when building it then the outcome would be a rewarding. I bought diffrent books and read them just as I would any other process and now find myself actually enjoying the finishing. I have read through the other replys and there is a lot of excellent information there. I look at it as the finishing process start the moment I start my project. Wood selection, grain orientation, milling marks and so on. Reference material is at a arms reach just as the numerous books on construction. Then you just like your projects get better and better at it and one day you realize it was a great ride.

-- What we do in life will Echo through Eternity........

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huff

2828 posts in 3120 days


#16 posted 12-23-2012 02:36 PM

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

16272 posts in 4053 days


#17 posted 12-23-2012 02:49 PM

I see two major problems here:

The first one has been covered. Start with a coarser grit and work down through the finer ones. Until I got this through my head, I wasted a lot of time trying to remove defects or scratches with too fine a grit. Unless the surface is nearly flawless to begin with, start with 80 and go from there.

The second problem is one of mindset. If you look at the building phase as the main enchilada, and consider finishing to be just something you do after the project is complete, you will always be frustrated. As others have said, finishing is an art in itself, and you need to think of it as just as much a part of your creation as the cutting and gluing. I also find it helpful to always have another project at hand to work on while finishes are drying so I don’t get bored and/or overanxious.

Since someone got the BLO war going again, I feel obligated to put my 2 cents in on that issue. When applying BLO, wipe it on very liberally, then immediately wipe off as much as you possibly can. Wait at least 24 hours, then use the topcoat of your choice, or just paste wax. I have done a number of projects with just BLO and paste wax that turned out beautifully. Anyone who claims to have “ruined” a project with BLO is doing something wrong.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View Arminius's profile

Arminius

304 posts in 3639 days


#18 posted 12-23-2012 02:53 PM

Charlie – one addition I would make is that there a lot of commonly used woods could really do with a second wipe-off about 15 minutes later, and open-pored ones (such as oak) even a third wipe-off.

View RussellAP's profile

RussellAP

3103 posts in 2122 days


#19 posted 12-23-2012 03:10 PM

The handles I’ve used BLO on were rosewood and walnut sanded to 220. Maybe my BLO is just an old batch. I’ve sanded out to 600 and used BLO and within seconds it goes dark before I can wipe it off. This is just on a sample board, pine, cedar, oak, walnut, it turns everything dark. Does the stuff go bad, I’ve only had it for 6 months?

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

View CharlesNeil's profile (online now)

CharlesNeil

2143 posts in 3706 days


#20 posted 12-23-2012 03:11 PM

The BLO saga continues.
BLO can in fact blotch, and give a very unattractive appearance. We need to understand is not just BLO, any slow drying oil or solvent-based product would do the same.
As I type this I am looking at 40 different test samples using various oils/solvent-based products. The results are amazing, if I apply BLO, Danish oil, and pure Tung or any slow drying oil to a high tannin wood like cherry for example I can blotch it until it’s just horrible. On the other hand if I applied it to hard Maple which is also very blotch prone, I get no blotching. The reason for this is oils/solvents have a reaction with the tannins in the wood.

Also have 38 samples of various oils on glass, with noted exception to Behlens rock hard, tried-and-true and a very little yellow from BLO they all dried clear. However once applied to the higher tannin woods that darken they migrated into the soft grains, which create a blotch. The slower the dry the more they migrate thus more reaction time. The issue is BLO can look great on one wood and not another.

My biggest problem with BLO is it slow to dry, not to mention most of them today are simply linseed oil with Japan dryer, they have not been heat processed. All of that said it’s a weaker finish in my opinion. I can get the same results with a much more durable varnish oil, in much less time. So for me it’s one of those “why bother”.

On woods like Tiger Maple, quilted maple and other high figured woods it can do a nice job of enhancing the grain, however I can use shellac or a faster drying oil and get the same result and I don’t have to wait a week.

Again I’m not putting BLO down, but with all the formula changes in order to meet various regulations many of these products are not the same as it used to be. In my world where I do woodworking for living, I simply don’t have weeks to finish something, nor can I risk having an inferior finish. I have to use what I know works and holds up,BLO is not part of my regiment. Just my .02.

View RussellAP's profile

RussellAP

3103 posts in 2122 days


#21 posted 12-23-2012 03:14 PM

Don’t mean to start a BLO war so close to Christmas. It’s just a personal choice.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2170 posts in 2686 days


#22 posted 12-23-2012 03:17 PM

gshepherd said it better than I can. It all starts with attitude, which will improve as you hone your skills and broaden your knowledge of your basic go-to finish.

Hook and loop abrasives were referred to. This, in my opinion, is a scam perpetrated on amateurs. PSA discs are better, will last longer, cheaper, and will sand flatter. Plus, stuck to your fingers, they make final detail sanding 1/3 the work of holding onto paper and sanding.

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

16272 posts in 4053 days


#23 posted 12-23-2012 03:21 PM

Charles, I wouldn’t disagree anything you said, especially the part about it not being a particularly strong finish. I don’t consider it protective at all. But it was recommended to me early in my woodworking, and has given me some very attractive finishes.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

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albachippie

772 posts in 2870 days


#24 posted 12-23-2012 03:32 PM

I have nothing to contribute to this topic, but I read with interest! Great subject

-- Garry fae Bonnie Scotland

View Cosmicsniper's profile

Cosmicsniper

2202 posts in 2994 days


#25 posted 12-23-2012 04:07 PM

BTW, when I do use sandpaper by hand before the finish, I use a sanding block mostly and often just some paper folded over. Sometimes I use the random orbital, but only very lightly…it’s too easy to put too much pressure and create a swirl pattern and I always have to fight that tendency.

But I concur…finishing is a mindset and it starts the moment I mill my wood. I know that attention to detail in the milling will mean less prep work later. There are often times when, other than cleaning up glue squeeze-out and doing some cosmetic filling, my project will be ready to finish almost immediately after glue-up.

Again, don’t obsess with the sanding/prep-work…it’s only purpose is to remove tool marks. Once that’s done, move on. Getting the project smooth happens after the first seal coat, by lightly sanding with high grits (sandpaper, 3M pad, or steel wool). This is why I seldom sand beyond 120 grit (180 grit on end grain) when I use sandpaper. Going higher before the finish coats are a waste of time. What you feel on the surface is dictated by the finish, not the wood. The only time I sand higher is when I don’t use a finish, like when I use oil and wax.

But I think if you use scrapers and planes prior to glue-up, like I normally do, that you’ll discover none of isn’t so bad…and it allows you to invest in more cool tools!

-- jay, www.allaboutastro.com

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

116566 posts in 3412 days


#26 posted 12-23-2012 05:00 PM

For all you BLO fans out there , there’s a great new product that Charles has come out with that even saves on sanding

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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longgone

5688 posts in 3144 days


#27 posted 12-23-2012 05:04 PM

You have to love every step of a project to get the absolute best results…if you dislike sanding or finishing (or any process involved from start to completion) it will be the weak link in the chain and will most certainly show up in your completed project.
I sculpt and carve boxes and these require more hand sanding than most people ever do on either a small or large product. With the compound curves going both with and against the grain, I find it necessary to wrap a piece of sandpaper around my finger to follow the grain that flows with the ever-changing curve. I find that sanding to at least 220 or even 320 is necessary because the finer grits will bring out finer detail of the grain patterns that will not be appreciated by just sanding to 120 or 180…
After being accustomed to doing this much hand sanding I feel like sanding a flat surface project seems like a walk-in-the-park.
Finishing is every bit as important since it is the icing on the cake for everything you have done so far. Experiment on those scrap cut off pieces from the same wood as the project Never cut corners to get your project done…! It reflects who you are and what you can accomplish.

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Uncle_Salty

183 posts in 2908 days


#28 posted 12-23-2012 06:19 PM

I am high school woodshop teacher. I am not Flexnor or anything, but I teach the following methods, and we get very good and consistent results.

After parts are milled, we sand with 100 grit, using the Porter Cable 5” ROS with H/L system.
Projects are then assembled. Make certain to control glue squeeze out and to wipe off squeeze out with a wet sponge.
After glue has dried, students wipe joints with mineral spirits to determine if there is any squeeze out. Any squeeze out is removed with a scraper or a chisel.
Wood filler is applied to obvious defects.
Projects are then sanded to 150, then 180.
If project is not going to be stained and simply clear coated, Students sand to 220.
Projects are then blown off with 100psi and the tack cloth is rubbed over the project.
If project is stained, staining is applied using a rag, and then wiped down after ten minutes to level out the stain. Projects are then allowed to dry for 8-24 hours. I am not in love with it, but we use Minwax oil based stain.
Projects are then sanded with 0000 grit steel wool, blown off, and then tack cloth is applied again.
Beginning students use wipe on polyurethane. Either gloss, semi-gloss, or satin. I make my own mix… 50% Minwax fast drying poly and 50% mineral spirits. Poly mix is applied with a small rag, and the rag is kept in a ziplock bag between coats.
This mixture will dry to to the touch in 15-20 minutes. Since we have a 90 minute block, some students can get as many as 5 coats on in a block.
After the poly cures (overnight at minimum), projects are sanded lightly with 0000 steel wool, tack cloth, and more poly mix is applied until the desired sheen or coat is obtained. I require all students to apply at least three coats.

Advanced students may spray the above mentioned poly mix with either hi pressure spray gun, or HVLP. Usually two coats, with a good sanding (0000 steel wool, once again) between, gets the job done.

I accidently ordered some Mosers water based lacquer several years ago. Instead of sending it back, I decided to use it. I like it very much. Clean up is easy and it works well. It doesn’t amber up, however. I tell students that if they don’t stain, they should use poly, but they have the option of using the h2o based stuff if they desire.

Students can wax projects with Minwax paste wax when finished.

I am not in love with Minwax. However, it is like McDonalds: it is everywhere and always the same. Very consistent.

Sometimes, I do let students use lacquer. But lacquer and thinner is getting more difficult to find at a good price.

In addition, I used to work in a furniture shop. Lacquer is a great product for a fast drying, good looking finish. However, it offers limited protection for the wood itself from moisture.

My system ain’t perfect, but it works!

View Joe Lyddon's profile

Joe Lyddon

9979 posts in 3887 days


#29 posted 12-23-2012 06:22 PM

LOL… I gotta try that Tuna Oil! LOL

Is that a bogus container? I thought he caught the mistake BEFORE being final…(??)

Yes! Finishing can take as long or LONGER than it took to BUILD the project…
... BUT, if you want your hard work to look as good as it can be, it would be wise to be PATIENT... let things dry that need to be dried... sand what needs to be sanded (properly)... go ahead and apply 2-3+ more coats of that topcoat if you think it will look better… When you are done, you will be more proud of it... and you will feel that it was worth the effort.

Some things that may be confusing in describing sanding, while applying coats of Shellac, Lacquer, or Poly, etc. could be:

When told to sand between coats, that does NOT mean using the sander and really going at the sanding process!

It really means a VERY LIGHT sanding… BY HAND… and only to remove very small nubs that may be present… use your fingers to FEEL the difference… usually takes seconds or a very quick/fast operation depending on the size of the project… a box, for example, seconds and is in NO WAY a real “chore” to do.
Lightly sand followed by a quick rub-own with a clean soft cloth to remove any dust BETWEEN coats… including the final coat but with a very high grit.

So, it may sound like a PITA procedure… but, it really isn’t…

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

View Terry Ferguson's profile

Terry Ferguson

203 posts in 2502 days


#30 posted 12-23-2012 07:04 PM

Jim – that Tuna Oil is hilarious – thanks for the humor.

All of the above posts offer excellent information, to which, I can add nothing more except to say that on some of my projects, sandpaper has been completely omitted in favor of scrapers and card scrapers. They produce a nice smooth surface that shows off the grain nicely that takes stain and clear finishes well. And, I also, tend to perform the scraping process prior to assembling the parts so that in the final stages, prep for finish is less tedious. I couldn’t agree more about experimenting and making samples of all prep and finishing prior to the actual doing of it.

-- Terry Ferguson, Bend Oregon

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

116566 posts in 3412 days


#31 posted 12-23-2012 07:28 PM

The tuna oil is a very funny joke alright, I didn’t do the work on it . a friend of Charles Neil did it,named Bill,he came up with the idea and photo work. It all started with a typo error in Charles new finishing book where tong oil was mistaken for Tuna oil.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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teejk

1215 posts in 2520 days


#32 posted 12-23-2012 07:59 PM

I guess I have to agree with the author…I love the design and machine aspects…dread the finishing aspects. Unfortunately the appearance of the product is more a function of the latter than the former.

I start with 80g ROS and progress to 120 and finish at 220…very light pressure and I don’t have to “grind” stuff that way and it goes quickly. And I have started to partially stain joints before assembly (I can’t figure out that glue squeeze out other than to use a gel stain which is more paint than stain IMHO).

Top coats I have started using Johnson paste wax in lieu of varnish if the material is not going to see any abuse. Tops and abuse stuff I moved to Minwax water-based solely because of the dry time. In between top-coats I violate the Minwax instructions and use steel wool. Never had a problem and I find it vacs better than sanding.

In any event, because I detest it all, a 6 pack and a good radio help a lot (no major power tools involved at that stage). I am fussy so I’m not done until I feel only a silk finish.

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Ted

2808 posts in 2046 days


#33 posted 12-23-2012 08:14 PM

imho, life is too short for complex finishes. Maybe if I was building fine furniture, then I would take the time to do the 6 levels of sanding, the seal coat, the 8 coats of finish sanded between every coat, etc… But I just make simple boxes and stuff. Poly, shellac, wipe-on wipe-off… those are good enough for what I do. I generally don’t use stains.

-- The first cordless tool was a stick. The first power tool was a rock.

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Ted

2808 posts in 2046 days


#34 posted 12-23-2012 08:17 PM

Oh, and the tuna oil.. I like that idea. And there’s plenty of stray cat’s in my neighborhood looking for a warm shop for the winter! :D

-- The first cordless tool was a stick. The first power tool was a rock.

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NiteWalker

2736 posts in 2412 days


#35 posted 12-23-2012 08:31 PM

I agree that life is too short for complex finishes or making finishing into an art form. I like doug stowe’s approach, finding a good finish that works, and sticking with it.

For me, that’s 2 coats of sealcoat followed by 4-6 coats of crystalac super premium all sprayed on. A bit of wet sanding if necessary and I’m done. I only sand to 120; for my finishing routine, I’ve never seen any difference between going from 120 to 150, 180, 220. The finish comes out the same. Maybe because it’s a high build finish?

-- He who dies with the most tools... dies with the emptiest wallet.

View CharlesNeil's profile (online now)

CharlesNeil

2143 posts in 3706 days


#36 posted 12-23-2012 09:31 PM

Jim , You are bad , I was proof reading the book and came upon Tuna Oil , when I questioned “The Girls” about it , they showed me what I had written, long hand mind you. I obviously didnt get enough “tail” on the g , in Tung , thus we had Tuna Oil , so I talked about it in our show, it was pretty funny.Then my friend Bill decided to go a bit further and do the label over a jar of our blotch control , and put it on our forum.

Jim has decided to expand its market. In the show I said I could just see someone , going to the grocery store buying all the tuna and straining it , and smearing it all over something he made. That prompted the girls to get me one of those speech recognition typing programs, they pretty cool, but a word of caution, would= wood, and words like hit , slit,or sit shoud not be spoken quickly, if so Tuna Oil will be a major improvement for would finishes.

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Monte Pittman

27057 posts in 2173 days


#37 posted 12-23-2012 09:43 PM

No easy way. Finishing easlily takes as long as the rest of the project combined.

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it.

View teejk's profile

teejk

1215 posts in 2520 days


#38 posted 12-23-2012 10:22 PM

monte…I agree…the fun stuff happens first. I tried to introduce my brother to the craft several years ago and we built a few night stands with all the tools. He went home happy, I went back to work on my paying job, my wife did the finishing. When I got home and reviewed her work, I snuck them back into the shop and spent a ton of time (6 pack and the radio, trying to be quiet since the wife can be somewhat sensitive to critiques of her work…and then I had to do it again the next night).

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gfadvm

14940 posts in 2525 days


#39 posted 12-24-2012 02:52 AM

I have to agree with Greg on sanding to finer grits. I can see an improvement in the grain pattern from120 to 320 grit. The finer grits just seem to give a clearer look at the fine nuances of grain. I actually enjoy finishing and even sanding as the look improves with each step. Greg’s tagline is truly the secret to producing beautiful projects. There ain’t no shortcuts!Edit: I’d like to add that my enjoyment of sanding did not occur until I discovered QUALITY sandpaper (Abranet or Norton 3x) and a QUALITY sander (Dynabrade). Thanks to my LJ buddies Rance and Von Hagan for educating me in these areas.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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Gshepherd

1727 posts in 2037 days


#40 posted 12-24-2012 03:53 AM

It is all in the details. We all have our little quirks on what is the best way for us to finish according to our likes and dislikes. I used to dread finishing but now I actually enjoy it. A proper finish on a project can make it or break it. If you think of all the time it takes to do some of your projects don’t you think it deserves the same amount of care and time in the finishing? After all the finish will protect your investment.

If the finishing process is such a dredfull task then try and find someone who does it professionally until your more comfortable.

-- What we do in life will Echo through Eternity........

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OkiePaul

4 posts in 1815 days


#41 posted 12-24-2012 04:32 AM

I’m new to woodworking but I recently discovered bees wax and mineral oil, I made some band saw boxes out of select pine and simply brushed on a coat of Minwax golden pecan and about 30 minutes rubbed ok my wax that I cooked yesterday , let it sit for a few minutes and buffed it off. A couple of the pieces looked like cherry wood. I mix 4oz mineral oil and 1 oz bees wax and stick it in the microwave. Very simple. And some pieces I didn’t even use the stain.

-- OkiePaul

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Joe Lyddon

9979 posts in 3887 days


#42 posted 12-24-2012 04:52 AM

Oh!

There is another thing to watch out for when using the New Tuna Oil!!

If you do not let things dry properly & you apply the wrong thing at the wrong time,
it will tend to Fish Eye!!

Then, you have to strip & start over from ground zero!

That’s about the only thing about Tuna Oil that you have to be concerned with…
... just be sure to let it DRY good before proceeding to next coat(s), etc.

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.

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.

... and if this seems to sound a little ‘fishy’, it IS! LOL

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

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