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View Ben's profile

Confused about "Shaker" Style

by Ben
posted 494 days ago


17 replies so far

View ShaneA's profile

ShaneA

4957 posts in 1096 days


#1 posted 494 days ago

Hmm, I have always associated shaker style with flat panels. But, I guess rules are meant to be broken.

View David Craig's profile

David Craig

2130 posts in 1607 days


#2 posted 494 days ago

I think some of the confusion might be that some folks will equate shaker furniture with mission furniture. Mission is the style most commonly associated with flat panels and simple lines. Shaker style may be simple but they are different from missionary and will use raised panels.

-- There is little that is simple when it comes to making a simple box.

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

5375 posts in 1181 days


#3 posted 494 days ago

There were some “raised panels” to Shaker styled work, in fact a Cedar Chest i built awhile back had those style of raised panels. I did mine on the tablesaw, with the second cut being about 15 degrre tilt of the blade. All this does is create a better shadow line.

Not much of a Raised panel effect. Shakers liked thing very plain, with as little “adornment” as possible.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View Rick  Dennington's profile

Rick Dennington

3253 posts in 1692 days


#4 posted 494 days ago

Basically the Shaker moto was ” form follows function”.....they didn’t like gawdy style furniture and fixtures..They were a simple people with a simple lifesyle, thereby building simple furniture. Shaker style furniture is my favorite to build, plain and simple…....!!

-- " I started with nothing, and I've still got most of it left".......

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

2222 posts in 849 days


#5 posted 494 days ago

Many shaker pieces use flat panels, but there are exceptions. Here is one from a book I have.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View Ben's profile

Ben

201 posts in 1355 days


#6 posted 493 days ago

Thanks Bondo.
That looks awesome.
Pretty close to the Lonnie Bird set, I reckon.
Still trying to decide between flat panel or raised panel.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

109158 posts in 2075 days


#7 posted 493 days ago

View Ben's profile

Ben

201 posts in 1355 days


#8 posted 493 days ago

Thanks a1. I’ll check them out.

Looking at the Lonnie Bird Set, can’t find any info as to whether or not the bearing for the coping cutter can be removed to make extended tenons.

What do you guys think?

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

109158 posts in 2075 days


#9 posted 493 days ago

If your talking about a router bit ,it may work. Not sure a photo or link might help.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Ben's profile

Ben

201 posts in 1355 days


#10 posted 493 days ago

View Wdwerker's profile

Wdwerker

329 posts in 731 days


#11 posted 493 days ago

Some of the old shaker pieces I have repaired had the raised panel on the back or inside. The panel raise is done to fit the panel into the frame or drawer bottom, not for decoration.

-- Fine Custom Woodwork since 1978

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

109158 posts in 2075 days


#12 posted 493 days ago

It looks like the smaller router bits are for cope and stick.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Ben's profile

Ben

201 posts in 1355 days


#13 posted 493 days ago

Yes, they are Jim.
But I would never rely on a stub tenon in a door holding a 5/8” thick panel. I would want a longer/full length tenon, so I’m wondering if that cope cutter can do that. I’ll call Amana on Monday.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

109158 posts in 2075 days


#14 posted 493 days ago

Good thinking ,even though I’ve had cope and stick doors hold up for years ,now I add loose tenons in them.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Wdwerker's profile

Wdwerker

329 posts in 731 days


#15 posted 493 days ago

I use a domino in the corners of oversize raised panel doors. Cut right through the cope and stick joint. 6mm is real close to the thickness of the tongue on the cope. I make my own domino stock to fit the widest setting and cut them to fit the deepest plunge possible. You can use a hollow chisel mortice bit in your drill press to acheive the same thing.
A 16” by 42” raised panel door in my kitchen has held up 18 years with just glue and a cope and stick joint in the corners. No extra tenon length needed!

-- Fine Custom Woodwork since 1978

View John Ormsby's profile

John Ormsby

1262 posts in 2235 days


#16 posted 493 days ago

I have seen at least 6 different original shaker doors. From flat to raised panel. Charles Neil has some great books in his shop that shows pictures and drawings of shaker furniture. You might ask him about shaker doors. He know an awful lot about furniture.

-- Oldworld, Fair Oaks, Ca

View bruc101's profile

bruc101

526 posts in 2040 days


#17 posted 493 days ago

Shaker Style can also sometimes depend on what Shaker community the piece of furniture was made in.

-- Bruce http://plans.sawmillvalley.org http://www.sawmillgirls.com


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