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How do you hone in between sharpening sessions?

by live4ever
posted 11-14-2012 11:09 PM


40 replies so far

View MJCD's profile

MJCD

454 posts in 1090 days


#1 posted 11-14-2012 11:14 PM

With a guide (Veritas) and 2000-grit wet sandpaper; as my sharpening skills are in their infancy – I’ve been told by several LJ members do it freehand.

MJCD

-- Lead By Example; Make a Difference

View bobasaurus's profile

bobasaurus

1382 posts in 1903 days


#2 posted 11-14-2012 11:16 PM

I’m trying to change most of my sharpening technique to freehand for speed and easy setup. It makes for slightly convex bevels, but they still cut just as well. I touch-up freehand the same way I do a full sharpening, but starting at either the finest stone or medium then finest. I haven’t used a strop yet, but I plan on making one soon.

-- Allen, Colorado

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live4ever

983 posts in 1729 days


#3 posted 11-14-2012 11:17 PM

MJCD, do you use a microbevel? They sure are easy to create with the Veritas guide (love that thing…I’d be lost without it).

-- Optimists are usually disappointed. Pessimists are either right or pleasantly surprised. I tend to be a disappointed pessimist.

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live4ever

983 posts in 1729 days


#4 posted 11-14-2012 11:19 PM

bobasauras – at least you’re on the freehand track…those of us dependent on guides get screwed when it comes to touch-up!

-- Optimists are usually disappointed. Pessimists are either right or pleasantly surprised. I tend to be a disappointed pessimist.

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

6960 posts in 1633 days


#5 posted 11-14-2012 11:19 PM

I am finding more and more that I will use the “contractor’s paper” I have taped down on my workbench, to burnish my chisels and other blades while I am busy. Not perfect, but it surely does a good job, IMO.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

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live4ever

983 posts in 1729 days


#6 posted 11-14-2012 11:58 PM

Mike – contractor’s paper – is that like kraft paper?

-- Optimists are usually disappointed. Pessimists are either right or pleasantly surprised. I tend to be a disappointed pessimist.

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Smitty_Cabinetshop

10196 posts in 1337 days


#7 posted 11-15-2012 12:02 AM

Strop with green compound works very well, ala Paul Sellers’ 30 strokes.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

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StumpyNubs

6259 posts in 1519 days


#8 posted 11-15-2012 12:08 AM

I use a Worksharp 3000 with MDF discs covered with polishing compounds. To touch up the blade on a chisel I just stick it in the slot the machine has built in. I keep it set to the microbevel angle, so is needs no adjustments for a quick touch up. No jig required. For hand planes I usually put off honing until I absolutely have to. Then I use a jig on the top of the WS (I built a platform on an episode of BCWW). Since I am going to the trouble to take it out of the plane and all, putting it in a jig is not that much more work.

-- It's the best woodworking show since the invention of wood... New episodes at: http://www.stumpynubs.com

View TechRedneck's profile

TechRedneck

746 posts in 1576 days


#9 posted 11-15-2012 12:10 AM

It took a little effort at first, but I watched Paul Sellers videos on hand sharpening.

Touch ups for me now consist of 15 seconds on an 8000 grit waterstone (kept wet in a tub) then 30 strokes on a strop with green compound. Whole process from iron removal to replacement is 5 min tops. Chisels are quicker.

Once the backs are flat and polished, I never touch them again except one swipe on the strop to remove the micro burr.

I also made a dedicated sharpening station that keeps things organized. I refuse to use tools that are not sharp.

-- Mike.... West Virginia. "Man is a tool using animal. Without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all.". T Carlyle

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StumpyNubs

6259 posts in 1519 days


#10 posted 11-15-2012 12:35 AM

TechRedneck- I heard that leaving your waterstones in the tub is bad for them. I don’t use waterstones, but I wondered about that…

-- It's the best woodworking show since the invention of wood... New episodes at: http://www.stumpynubs.com

View live4ever's profile

live4ever

983 posts in 1729 days


#11 posted 11-15-2012 01:16 AM

TechRedneck – that’s exactly what I’m going for on touch-ups. Only my problem is that I’m terrible at freehanding microbevels. It does more harm than good to touch them up. Are you using microbevels/freehanding them?

-- Optimists are usually disappointed. Pessimists are either right or pleasantly surprised. I tend to be a disappointed pessimist.

View TechRedneck's profile

TechRedneck

746 posts in 1576 days


#12 posted 11-15-2012 01:21 AM

Stumps

No issues so far, I rinse the stone and change its bath water every month or so but thats it. It is a stone that needs to be wet. Now my shop is heated, if it were not and prone to freezing, that’s another issue.

-- Mike.... West Virginia. "Man is a tool using animal. Without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all.". T Carlyle

View paratrooper34's profile

paratrooper34

760 posts in 1671 days


#13 posted 11-15-2012 01:45 AM

I use a leather disc on a WS 3000. Quick and easy to get a dulling blade freshened up. Since I use waterstones as my sharpening system, the WS 3000 has a primary function for the touch-ups.

I second keeping waterstones in water all the time. Been doing it for a few years now with no effect whatsoever. I keep a little bleach in there to keep the water from getting funky and they do just fine.

-- Mike

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thebigvise

190 posts in 1619 days


#14 posted 11-15-2012 01:46 AM

I admire my freehand colleagues, but I love the precision of my Veritas Mk II guide. Yes, it definitely takes longer…

-- Paul, Clinton, NC

View MJCD's profile

MJCD

454 posts in 1090 days


#15 posted 11-15-2012 01:48 AM

I do use the micro-bevel; and I don’t touch the backs – probably once every two months I’ll polish the backs, just to ensure no gummy build-up. And I do keep a wet-sandpaper handy during all project builds – One of TechRednecks many sage practices.

Since I use a consistent angle (probably not the best practice), I don’t need to use the Veritas reference jig – I just pop the blade into the honing guide, preset for micro-bevel; quick stokes on the wet paper, and I’m ready to go.

I’m not as finicky as most others on the amount of time spent touching-up during a project build – I’ve had what most would call a stressful career; I’m not going to ruin any years I have remaining worried about how much time I spend sharpening tools. If the blade needs a quick honing then hone the blade!

By the way, there are Optimists, Pessimists, and Realists; and depending on the circumstances the Realist is always one of the other two.

MJCD

-- Lead By Example; Make a Difference

View Loren's profile

Loren

7808 posts in 2367 days


#16 posted 11-15-2012 01:55 AM

I leave a buffing wheel on the right side of my grinder
and touch up edges, but especially carving tools with
rouge on the wheel.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View TechRedneck's profile

TechRedneck

746 posts in 1576 days


#17 posted 11-15-2012 02:53 AM

Live4

When you freehand, there is no microbevel. I do use a guide on a XC diamond plate to establish a primary bevel. If the iron is really bad I will break out the wet grinder.

Then I work up the grits using a honing guide. I use wet stones and sandpaper whatever I am in the mood for. Final polishing on 2000 grit then strop. Still, no microbevel. After that, freehanding sort of gives you the same thing, the tip naturally rounds down.

The key here using any method, freehand or honing guide is to have two highly polished surfaces meet. Both work fine. In my opinion freehanding is quicker, and being that allows me to get back an edge and get back to work.

-- Mike.... West Virginia. "Man is a tool using animal. Without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all.". T Carlyle

View lwllms's profile

lwllms

547 posts in 2000 days


#18 posted 11-15-2012 03:53 AM

The edge is either sharp or it’s not. Touch-up??? I think you need to simplify your sharpening technique. Touch up your sharpening method, not the tool.

I also don’t understand why the A-2 steel. Why do you use it? What do you gain? What woods do you use? Do you understand the metallurgy involved?

View live4ever's profile

live4ever

983 posts in 1729 days


#19 posted 11-15-2012 04:55 AM

lwllms

My rudimentary understanding is that A2 is tougher to sharpen but the edge lasts longer. O1 is faster to sharpen but wears more quickly. Since I had a choice between A2 and O1 for some of my tools, I went with A2 for plane irons (because I’d prefer the edge to last longer). Works for me. If there is something inherently incorrect about that decision or metallurgy knowledge that would help to make a better decision, I hope you’ll take the time to share it.

Perhaps my sharpening technique can be simplified – that’s why I asked the original question and why I pondered getting rid of the microbevel (though that would actually increase sharpening time). You seem to be intimating there are sharpening techniques out there that would result in edges not requiring touch up. I’d love to hear about them.

-- Optimists are usually disappointed. Pessimists are either right or pleasantly surprised. I tend to be a disappointed pessimist.

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

3845 posts in 2087 days


#20 posted 11-15-2012 05:36 AM

I watch in awe Rob Cosman sharpening videos and try to emulate with the stone and paper grits I have. So far, so good.

I took an ECE plane iron that my late uncle in Germany sent me and wasn’t sharp enough to cut butter without tearing it to a edge that is extremely sharp and you can even see you face in it. My first cut on redwood gave me a curl I used to make this.

It wasn’t easy to take it from where it was to where it is now but keeping it sharp will be easier!

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View bladedust's profile

bladedust

169 posts in 985 days


#21 posted 11-15-2012 05:59 AM

I keep my stone in water also. I use an old swifer conainer with a lid. Keeps the stone wet and the funky stuff out.

-- ok, is it cut once measure twice, cut twice measure once???? I know....I'll just keep cutting until it's long enough.

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

6960 posts in 1633 days


#22 posted 11-15-2012 11:34 AM

Live4ever:
”...Mike – contractor’s paper – is that like kraft paper?...”

It is a 36in wide X 50/100ft roll of the equivalent of the old paper sack grocery bags, nice and thick. Used to keep glue and stain off of the bench and such. I bought at HD.

Of course, when not actually “using” my chisels and planes, I will do the “formal” sharpening/honing process. However, I am NOT going to STOP in the middle of every WW task to formally sharpen/hone a tool. The contractor’s paper that I have taped to the bench that I am currently using allows me to continue working without having to stop and setup for a “YouTube” style sharpening/honing session elsewhere in the shop.

Try it. You will like the results.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View lwllms's profile

lwllms

547 posts in 2000 days


#23 posted 11-16-2012 03:02 AM

Live4,

Let’s do this in two posts. First sharpening. Like everything else in hand tool woodworking it’s best to start with traditional trade practice. The tools and the techniques to use and sharpen them evolved together over centuries. Trade practice was such that the average person could have success if they understood the process and sequence.

Most plane irons are ground at 25º and honed at about 30º. This leaves the bevel with two distinct surfaces. Maintain a small honed bevel by grinding every few sharpenings. I like to keep the honed bevel from around 1/32” to 3/32” it only takes a couple passes over a well dressed stone to remove the wear from the edge on the bevel and raise a wire edge. The main thing is keeping the flat faces of your tools flat and your sharpening stones flat. The more precise you are with this the easier and faster sharpening is. This is because the critical work in honing is done on the flat face. Both surfaces that make up the edge suffer dulling wear in use. If you keep your tool’s flat face flat and your stones flat you can remove the wear quickly from the flat face with the coarsest stone necessary to make it quick work and subsequent finer stone(s) will uniformly remove the abrasive signatures or scratches of the previous stone.

It should take less than a minute to hone a tool.

This is the way it’s been done until all the honing guides and other gimmicks came along to complicate things and slow the process down.

Joseph Moxon alluded to this method when describing sharpening in 1680. Here’s Peter Nicholson’s 1845 description of the same process:

And it continued this way for a long time. Here’s the same thing described on the back of a Stanley block plane iron package from the 1970’s:

The evolved method is easy and very fast. You do need to grind and you need to dress your stones very frequently to keep them uniformly flat. Dressing my oil stones only takes a few seconds at each use or when ever the abrasives get dull and the cutting action slows.

View lwllms's profile

lwllms

547 posts in 2000 days


#24 posted 11-17-2012 03:19 AM

Sorry for the delay here. I do paperwork for my business in the evenings and last night I had a lot that had to be done.

Let’s talk about A-2 steel.

Does A-2 steel have greater wear resistance than oil or water hardening steels? Yes, in some ways and no in other ways. A-2 has a greater resistance to abrasive wear than oil or water hardening steels when using ASTM testing methods. There are a lot of testing machines that meet these standards and they all test a flat surface rubbing against a flat surface. These tests aren’t designed to test acute cutting edges like one finds in woodworking tools.

An other thing is there are more wear mechanisms than abrasive wear. Most American steel producers seem to use abrasive wear as the indication of wear resistance. What is the wear mechanism that causes the dulling wear to cutting edges? I’m not an expert in tribology so I can’t say for sure. My best guess is that it’s either temperature induced corrosive wear, adhesive wear or a combination of the two. This chart from Uddeholm, a European based steel company shows that both A-2 steel and O-1 have nearly identical resistance to adhesive wear:

Abrasive wear is interesting. Abrasives are just a collection of very small cutting edges. For abrasion to work the abrasive needs to be harder than the material being abraded. For instance, I use Arkansas stones for my fine stones. The abrasive in novaculite, which is what true Arkansas stones are made of, is slightly softer than the carbide inclusions in hardened A-2 steel. Arkansas stones won’t abrade A-2 steel because of this.

This leads me to a question. If abrasion is the wear mechanism that causes dulling wear in woodworking edge tools, what in the wood is harder than hardened tool steel. For the most part, the answer is nothing. Yes some tropical woods and a few domestic woods like bois d’arc and western cedar have some silica in them. Silica is hard enough to abrade tool steel but domestic woods normally used for woodworking have, at most, trace amounts of silica or anything else hard enough to abrade hardened tool steel. If abrasion was the dulling wear mechanism, edge tools working woods like white pine, poplar or cherry should last indefinitely. They don’t. So when do you, as a woodworker, encounter the abrasion resistance of A-2 steel? When you sharpen or grind it. I does leave you thinking, “Boy, that was hard as h*ll to sharpen. That edge will really last.” It’s a misconception, though.

What are inclusions, anyway? Inclusions are impurities that aren’t structurally part of the steel. Think pebbles in a big sheet of ice. If you could make a big cutting edge out of that ice, a lot of the pebbles that wind up on the cutting edge will just fall out. The carbide inclusions in A-2 steel do the same. They leave you an unrefined ragged edge. This is why some people suggest relatively obtuse bevels on A-2 steel. They’re trying to encapsulate as many of those inclusions as they can. Inclusions, of any type, were traditionally considered a flaw in steel for edge tools. I don’t see why that should change.

Were do these inclusions come from? The carbide inclusions in A-2 steel are formed during heat treating, mostly during a relatively long high temperature soak. That high temperature soak is above critical temperature. One of the rules of heat treating is for a fine grained steel bring the steel temperature only to critical temperature and hold it there only long enough to get a uniform change from ferrite to austenite. The longer you keep it at critical temperature or the higher the temperature the more coarse the grain will be. With highly alloyed steels this can be mitigated to a degree with either a stainless foil wrap or by using an inert atmosphere furnace but only somewhat mitigated. With A-2 the steel surrounding the carbide inclusions will have a more coarse grain than properly heat treated oil or water hardening steel. There’s no way around this if you want to form the carbides during heat treating. So even if all the carbides fall out of the cutting edge of an A-2 steel tool, the remaining steel is relatively coarse grained and won’t take as good an edge as properly heat treated oil or water hardening steel.

I don’t use Western cedar, bois d’arc, or other woods with a high silica content. I don’t make bamboo fishing rods of cane with a high silica content. I don’t know what to tell someone who does. I use the domestic woods normally used in woodworking and there’s no gain for me with A-2 steel but A-2 has a lot of down sides for me.

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live4ever

983 posts in 1729 days


#25 posted 11-17-2012 03:50 AM

lwllms

Thanks for typing all that out. Your second post in particular was very informative for me since it went beyond the usual A2/O1 info a woodworker picks up on the internet. I’m trained as an engineer with a decent amount of materials science background, so I appreciate your explanation. It’s probably the most compelling case against A2 that I’ve read.

However, I was under the impression that A2 plane irons lasted longer than O1 for the average woodworker, not just in ASTM-based testing. I certainly haven’t done a head-to-head comparison, but I believe there are folks who have (for example taking a set number of swipes with each plane iron on a common wood) and then either imaging the edge under high magnification or subjectively measuring the sharpness. Again, I haven’t done a test like this myself, but it seems like it’s common knowledge that A2 survives paring (of a plane iron) or chopping (as in a chisel) better than O1? Veritas has images from their testing of PM-V11 (pm-v11.com) and I’d agree that A2 and O1 weren’t THAT much different from one another, both in wear testing and in impact resistance. The wear testing was done by paring MDF, so it’s not a very “real-world” test.

I can certainly buy your argument that the downsides of A2 (e.g. harder to sharpen) outweigh the minimal wear resistance gains.

That all being said, I suppose your point (correct me if I’m wrong) is that were I using O1 instead of A2, I might have an easier time freehanding my blades and not feel the need to use a jig?

And finally, what are your thoughts on PM-V11?

-- Optimists are usually disappointed. Pessimists are either right or pleasantly surprised. I tend to be a disappointed pessimist.

View paratrooper34's profile

paratrooper34

760 posts in 1671 days


#26 posted 11-17-2012 09:22 AM

Here is a real world comparison for A2 steel that you can ponder:

On the plane for my shooting board, a Record T-5, I, at first, used it with the factory blade. The edge definitely did not stay long, especially when I got into some of the harder woods (QSWO and elm). So I decided to try an A2 blade. Yup, it is harder to sharpen. But guess what? That edge stays much, much longer on that plane. A2 is advertised as being able to hold an edge longer. My experience shows it does exactly as advertised. Would I buy it for other tools? Nah, O1 or whatever the vintage tools used for compounds works well enough that the increased cost and difficulty to sharpen just isn’t worth it. But for a tool that is going to take some abuse, absolutely go with A2.

-- Mike

View lwllms's profile

lwllms

547 posts in 2000 days


#27 posted 11-18-2012 12:26 AM

Paratrooper,

The chrome vanadium Record/Marples used in chisels and plane irons since the 1960’s is a far cry from normal oil or water hardening steel. Chrome vanadium steel is famous for its folding edges. Put a Hock O-1 iron in that plane and do your comparison.

Live4,

I don’t have any experience with Lee Valley’s powder metal steel and I don’t expect that I’ll mess with it. My honing system works fine for all my edge tools, takes up less than two square feet, requires no accessories, and is always set up ready to use. I don’t really want to start duplicating things. I don’t have a problem with edge retention or sharpening.

Lee Valley does deserve credit for developing a steel around the requirements of woodworking. My question about it is what was the impetus for developing it? Was the main driving force a search for a steel that would better resist the often reported flat face wear bevel caused by inadequate clearance angle in bevel-up low angle planes?

View Kreegan's profile

Kreegan

1452 posts in 865 days


#28 posted 11-18-2012 12:36 AM

Considering that the first tool released with their new steel was a chisel, my guess would be no.

Rich;)

View paratrooper34's profile

paratrooper34

760 posts in 1671 days


#29 posted 11-18-2012 12:47 AM

Is there a difference between Hock’s O1 and Lie-Nielsen’s? If not, then I have already made that comparison.

-- Mike

View Don W's profile

Don W

15397 posts in 1286 days


#30 posted 11-18-2012 12:55 AM

I hollow grind, it makes free hand easier, so touchup on my 3 micron dmt just a few strokes and I’m done.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View thedude50's profile

thedude50

3528 posts in 1197 days


#31 posted 12-04-2012 12:18 AM

Quite frankly if I am going to take the iron out of the plane I am going to sharpen it . I will have a well established angle ground on the t7 tormek and once that is done I will sharpen on the Naniwa Whetstones in the following order.
1000 grit and then 6000 then 10000 grit and if I am feeling froggy 12000 grit I will use the same bevel several times and if I think I have a bad angle or a chip I turn back to the tormek to re grind. I no longer lap things with the strop I find the mirror finish from the 10000 grit whetstone is so sharp I never play with something that may screw up the finish. I find my current method is very fast and I can take a iron off go through the 3-4 grits and be done in less than 3 minutes. If I have to re grind I have to add 5 minutes to the sharpening job. Still very fast and my results are very good. I have been perfecting my technique and it has evolved over 40 years . I have come a long way since oil stones and am very pleased with the Naniwa and the Tormek I also have a worksharp 3000 and it does see use in certain cases.

-- when I am not on Lumberjocks I am on @ http://thisoldworkshop.com where we allow free speech

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blackcherry

3186 posts in 2542 days


#32 posted 12-04-2012 12:47 AM

Try this mechanical ruler trick by Dave Chadworth as shown by Deneb Puchalski in this you tube video..http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1F7q5WGb4ZA....BC

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thedude50

3528 posts in 1197 days


#33 posted 12-05-2012 09:29 PM

that would be charlesworth

-- when I am not on Lumberjocks I am on @ http://thisoldworkshop.com where we allow free speech

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Alexandre

1417 posts in 910 days


#34 posted 12-05-2012 09:37 PM

The PM-V11 steels hold their edge really well, ( I have the chisel) I like to freehand hone my tools on a mdf board with that veritas compound. Pm-v11 (well on my chisel) forms a burr thats slightly annoying but okay.

-- My terrible signature...

View Derek Cohen's profile

Derek Cohen

183 posts in 2687 days


#35 posted 12-07-2012 04:06 PM

In order to make the touch-up as painless as possible, I’d prefer not to have to chuck the blade in the honing guide because I’m not likely to touch-up if I have to spend time getting out the guide, setting up, yadda yadda. But it’s almost impossible (for me) to touch-up a micro-bevel freehand. Perhaps I need to re-think my initial sharpening strategy and use a larger secondary bevel instead of a tiny one?

Try stropping just the back of the blade. This has worked for me.

Regards from Perth

Derek

-- Buildiing furniture, and reviewing and building tools at http://www.inthewoodshop.com

View live4ever's profile

live4ever

983 posts in 1729 days


#36 posted 12-07-2012 04:32 PM

Hi Derek,

Thanks for the tip – I will try that! By the way, thanks also for your most excellent site. It has been a great guide for me as the hand tool affliction has taken hold. Rob Lee should also send you at least 10% of the proceeds from Veritas goodies I’ve purchased recently.

-- Optimists are usually disappointed. Pessimists are either right or pleasantly surprised. I tend to be a disappointed pessimist.

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

6960 posts in 1633 days


#37 posted 12-07-2012 10:53 PM

”...So how do you guys “touch-up” quickly in the middle of a planing session? Free-hand or with a guide?...”

It seems many have lost sight of your request for a quick “while your planing” request. I like to use either:
  • a used well piece of 600 grit. OR
  • the contractor’s paper I use to protect my WB.

Both are quick and BOTH are NOT perfect, but BOTH work….

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View davidroberts's profile

davidroberts

1003 posts in 2205 days


#38 posted 01-16-2013 08:03 PM

Horizontal Mike said of the “contractor paper” he uses

“It is a 36in wide X 50/100ft roll of the equivalent of the old paper sack grocery bags, nice and thick. Used to keep glue and stain off of the bench and such. I bought at HD.”

Just as a point of trivia, and possible pertinent to this discussion, Typical old style grocery bag paper from days gone by (1960s-1970s) is equivalent to IIRC about 13,000 to 15,000 grit. I could be off a thou or two, but I think it was 13,000. I believe I read that little tidbit on LJ a few years ago, and it sounded strange, though reasonable. I used an electric iron and made a piece of present-day brown lunch sack paper real flat, then taped one edge to dead flat granite and worked it like a strop. And who would have thunk, it works real good.

I’ve been in a lapping/sharpening/honing phase for the past two week, a hour or so each evening. I have a set of chisels that I spent a lot of time lapping and polishing the face, but was never satisfied with the lapping job I did on my plane irons and other chisels I use.

They were in various stages of dullness. Certainly nearby arm hair had nothing to worry about.

So when I started lapping through ALL the grits and trying to remove ALL the scratches (OCD flareup, it will subside, eventually) with oil stones, water stones, wet/dry sandpaper, diamond paste, green, white, red, blue, gold rouge strops, 0.3 micron 3M lapping film (OCD is tough, OCD is tough, OCD is tough) sorry, Mother’s 0.05MIC polish on a leather strop (real tough), and swiping through thin air – it must be thin – I noticed pretty quickly I had a few more gray hairs than I remember, as seen on the face of a 2” wide iron, and I had inadvertently honed the sharpest irons and chisels I have ever held in my hand. They would draw blood from just the mere thought of carelessness. So Mr. Cohen from Perth is absolutely correct, as I have proven about 20 times recently. A little face time with lapping medium for touchup is no different than touching the bevel, and is much easier to hold the angle, at least for me.

Great discussion. Thanks

-- God is great, wood is good. Let us thank Him for wood......and old hand tools.

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

6960 posts in 1633 days


#39 posted 01-16-2013 08:24 PM

Hey thanks David! It’s nice to hear from others that I am not quite as crazy as I seem. And that brown paper is directly under the piece you are working at the time. All I know is that my chisels kept getting shinier and shinier in between sharpening sessions. Can’t argue with success.

8-)

http://www.woodmagazine.com/woodworking-tips/techniques/skills/sharpening-chisels/?page=3

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

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davidroberts

1003 posts in 2205 days


#40 posted 01-18-2013 02:16 AM

Thank you HM. I got a package today wrapped in medium weight brown paper, about 4 square feet. Coincidence? I think not!

-- God is great, wood is good. Let us thank Him for wood......and old hand tools.

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