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View bues0022's profile

Drying thick trunk slabs

by bues0022
posted 656 days ago


18 replies so far

View Doss's profile

Doss

779 posts in 898 days


#1 posted 656 days ago

Well, let’s just get this out of the way, you’re going to end up with cracked wood regardless. If you understand the structure of wood, you’ll understand what’s going to happen and why it’ll crack.

Also, that oven will dry them way too fast.

Your best bet is to save several disks that are in order and piece them together (woodglue) from the uncracked pieces. You may get lucky and have one that doesn’t crack… but I doubt it. There are products on the market that can possibly stop this from happening, but not on a disk this large.

Some woods don’t crack as much as other. Oak is not one of these. I had an oak disk go 4 months without cracking (24” diameter). One day I came home from work and it had opened up about 1” on the edge.

What is this flattening cut you’re talking about?

-- "Well, at least we can still use it as firewood... maybe." - Doss

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1100 posts in 1110 days


#2 posted 655 days ago

Put about 3 or 4 coats of anchorseal on each face. However, like Doss said, cookies crack, especially oak.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT15 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln

View jap's profile

jap

1226 posts in 688 days


#3 posted 655 days ago

but the crack can add character…in the right projects

-- Joel

View grizzman's profile

grizzman

6943 posts in 1937 days


#4 posted 655 days ago

there going to crack, nothing you can really do to stop it, the anchor seal might help some, but…still gonna happen, you should coat them with some cheap oil base paint, sticker them, keep them in the shade and forget about them, check on them after a year to see how there doing, if there still looking ok, then forget about them for another year and then check the moisture and see where there at…

-- GRIZZMAN ...[''''']

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11644 posts in 2322 days


#5 posted 655 days ago

Basic rule of thumb is one year per inch of thickness on lumber. This will depend on species and drying environment.
I don’t know how much longer it will take to dry a cookie with Anchorseal coating it on both sides.
Best wishes on the “not cracking”. : )

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

View Doss's profile

Doss

779 posts in 898 days


#6 posted 655 days ago

Rick, I have mentioned Pentacryl before but didn’t bother mentioning it here b/c I really can’t vouch for the success on something this large and possibly unruly.

-- "Well, at least we can still use it as firewood... maybe." - Doss

View Doss's profile

Doss

779 posts in 898 days


#7 posted 655 days ago

Rick, are you in bot mode?

I know what they state, but they also state “oak”. The characteristics of all species of “oak” are not the same.

-- "Well, at least we can still use it as firewood... maybe." - Doss

View bues0022's profile

bues0022

215 posts in 1794 days


#8 posted 655 days ago

I maybe should have been more clear with my cracking point. I had dried some pieces in my friend’s oven previously, and when they cracked, the board essentially split in two. Some radial cracks will not make me loose any sleep, as long as the piece doesn’t fall in half. As some mentioned, the cracks can give character. Depending on the size, I could epoxy them, or put in a bowtie, inlay some turquoise, etc. Lots of options.

I was looking for the most effective way to dry these pieces. It looks like I’ll have to clear out a spot in my garage, stack and sticker them. I’ll look into coating the surface to help keep cracks to a minimum, but it will happen, such is life.

How would these kiln dry? Kilns don’t take an inch per year, right? Is there any safe way to rig something up to help them dry faster? I know I won’t be working these any time soon, but if I can do something to these so I can work them in a year instead of two it might be worth it.

My “flattening” cut = I have a router sled made so I can flatten out large pieces of rough-cut lumber. (poor-mans giant planer) For example, one cookie is 6” thick on one side, and 4” on the other. I can hog off a bunch of material, bring total thickness down to 4” to help it dry. It won’t stay completely flat during drying, so after dry I’ll face it again to make it flat.

-- Ryan -- Maple Grove, MN

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11644 posts in 2322 days


#9 posted 655 days ago

6” thick on one side, and 4” on the other.
I would attack that with a sharp chainsaw before trying to route that much material off : )

safe way to rig something up to help them dry faster?
I just used an old 20” box fan to keep the air circulating around the last wood that I air dried.
It was in my garage ,not outside : )

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

View bues0022's profile

bues0022

215 posts in 1794 days


#10 posted 655 days ago

It’s a “lip”, and I figured it wouldn’t be that but, but your suggestion is noted. I’ll be back out there this weekend and might try that first. Good idea.

-- Ryan -- Maple Grove, MN

View Doss's profile

Doss

779 posts in 898 days


#11 posted 655 days ago

Yeah, I didn’t know what you were talking about with a flattening cut. I thought you were about to try to chainsaw a piece flat. LOL

I use a router sled for my slabs by the way. It’s effective enough. I have 6.75” power planer to help knock it down quickly though.

-- "Well, at least we can still use it as firewood... maybe." - Doss

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1100 posts in 1110 days


#12 posted 655 days ago

Wood dries fast from the end grain. A fan on oak will probably make the cookie dry too fast, and it will split worse. Slow is good with oak. Most kilns will not dry those cookies. Takes too much time.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT15 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln

View RussellAP's profile

RussellAP

2950 posts in 920 days


#13 posted 655 days ago

How did you cut these slabs? Are they vertical rings or horizontal? How thick are they? No matter what, it sounds like you’re going to be letting these sit for at least a year before they go to the kiln. Some will crack, but that’s life, just saw it off and use what’s left. Most of us who buy rough cut are used to the waste, but we get a great price on wood that way.
If they are still wet there is some stuff you can put on the end grain that will help, but my sawyer doesn’t mess with it.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

View bues0022's profile

bues0022

215 posts in 1794 days


#14 posted 654 days ago

How much surface area does a quart of Anchorseal cover? I can’t seem to find it online. I have just over 6000 square inches to cover (42 square feet). Will one quart be enough to soak in and coat all surfaces? Will a parafin/minera spirits mix do the same thing? (cheaper)

I am also wondering about location to dry them. The most convenient is my friend’s garage/shed that is only heated from time-to-time over the winter when he’s out there working. Otherwise it’s pretty frozen (MN winters). Should I talk him into keeping them inside his house in his basement? Keep them frozen all winter out in his barn? What’s the best condition to dry them under?

-- Ryan -- Maple Grove, MN

View Doss's profile

Doss

779 posts in 898 days


#15 posted 654 days ago

Does it really go down to freezing in the garage? If so, that’s probably not a great place for them.

I found some info that said a quart of Anchorseal covers 25 sq ft.

-- "Well, at least we can still use it as firewood... maybe." - Doss

View bues0022's profile

bues0022

215 posts in 1794 days


#16 posted 654 days ago

It’s a detached garage, so it definitely freezes hard when he doesn’t have the heater on.

-- Ryan -- Maple Grove, MN

View bues0022's profile

bues0022

215 posts in 1794 days


#17 posted 654 days ago

I found that site earlier, but it looks rather expensive.

I read somewhere about a 50/50 paraffin wax/mineral spirits mix – thoughts on effectiveness? Or by the time I buy everything and mess around with heating etc. will I just be better off with the anchorseal?

(anyone in the Minneapolis area know where the best deal is on this?)

-- Ryan -- Maple Grove, MN

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1100 posts in 1110 days


#18 posted 654 days ago

Anchorseal is the best stuff. It is designed to do just what you want to do. Get the original formula, not the green formula. You have to call them to order it. UC Coatings. There is no instant pudding.

Drying green oak in a heated space is asking for trouble.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT15 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln

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