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Rank Amateurs ongoing experience with the Grizzly Bear

by Whiskers
posted 660 days ago


37 replies so far

View GuyK's profile

GuyK

356 posts in 2713 days


#1 posted 660 days ago

Whiskers, hello and welcome to LJ’s. I am impressed with your list of tools. I have several Girzzly tools in my shop and I have been happy with their performance. Good luck with your new shop.

-- Guy Kroll www.thelandsathillsidefarms.org

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

5428 posts in 2009 days


#2 posted 660 days ago

That’s quite a first post! Welcome and congrats on a MAJOR purchase.

Good setup and good quality cutters are the key to the performance of cutting tools. Stock blades are notoriously poor…buy good blades and bits, and take your time setting up the critical tools. You’ve made some nice choices IMO, including your dado set. If you haven’t seen it, check out Grizzly’s free shop layout tool.

Any plans to buy a router or two? It’s the most versatile tool you can buy for a wood shop. How about a planer to compliment the capabilities of your jointer and TS?

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View Whiskers's profile

Whiskers

389 posts in 660 days


#3 posted 660 days ago

Good Morning People, I wanted to follow up immediately with a 2nd post, but system wouldn’t let me. Guess things set so some mods must filter what my first post was to make sure I wasn’t some total flake or troll as my post didn’t appear for quite some time. Hope that not true of every post on here, I hope I can gain some trust.

Hmm, well I guess I should deal with that reply I got from Knot, Right now I’m hitting midline on the blade and bit philosophy. I ordered 2 blades for the table saw from Amazon. Both Freud. I know they aren’t considered the absolute best, but they ain’t Ronco either. I recently bought a new skil saw and got a freud diablo blade made for cutting plywood with it. I was quite impressed with it and how well it did. It got exceptionally good reviews from the Amazon community and didn’t disappoint me. I have a bought a couple Freud blades I bought for the table saw which I hope repeat that performance.

View HalDougherty's profile

HalDougherty

1820 posts in 1870 days


#4 posted 660 days ago

Wow, that’s an impressive list. Each tool in my shop was a separate purchase with months or years between major tools. It takes a while to get proficient with most complex machines and you’ve got a lot of new equipment to learn how to use. Good Luck!!!!!!

When I was starting, I subscribed to a bunch of woodworking magazines. Wood Magazine had the best plans for the furniture I wanted to build. Shopnotes had the best jigs, Woodsmith had some advanced furniture I only wished I had the skills to build, and Fine Woodworking had plans and instructions that were way over my head. After several years, I still subscribe to Wood Magazine. Some of the others I subscribe to if I get a mailing from them with a price I can’t turn down. The rest I buy if they have something in them that I’d like to build or information I’m interested in. Used bookstores are also a good resource for cheap woodworking books and magazines. Ditto for E-Bay. I got back issues of Wood Magazine from 1995 to 2005 for less than $25. The seller also packed a bunch of other woodworking magazines in the boxes. Craig’s List’s tool section has been the biggest source for tools for the last two years.

-- Hal, Tennessee http://www.first285.com

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

5428 posts in 2009 days


#5 posted 660 days ago

Freud blades are a great choice….especially for a beginner because there are no clunkers, and they tend to represent really good value overall. Some are excellent, some are value oriented, some are for a specific task, so it really depends on which ones you chose, but all are good quality. (Glad you skipped the Ronco blades!)

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View Whiskers's profile

Whiskers

389 posts in 660 days


#6 posted 660 days ago

Oh goody, looks like I can post, so I can really start giving some info on this experience. Ok, the shipment. If you have never had anything trucked freight in, well let me tell you, There is no model to go by as the experience will vary every single time. When I had my huge 500lb desk delivered from Office Depot they just drove up, backed their truck up to my garage door and said howdy, here is your box. That was some non descript trucking firm with no national recognition. They were great, no hassles, no extra rip off charges, just hi, here is your box and they dropped it in my garage where I could deal with it in my own time.

Grizzly used UPS Freight, I think UPS Freight must require retardation as a mandate for employment, Especially on the management level. They acted like some kind of wierd quasi goverment organization citing safety excuses why they didn’t want to do their job and deliver. Oh heaven forbid a driveway be driven on, it might crack, that was not possible. The truck might spontaneously explode, taking the house with it, can’t get the truck near the house. I’ll give the driver credit though, he did deliver, but the two of us had to push the nine large heavy crates up my steep drive and into my garage. Apparantly the UPS drivers are under constant tattler monitoring and followed by spys eager to get them into trouble so they are a little paranoid about violating any of UPS’s rules and actually doing their job. I’m 53 years old and much too old for that, but thank god I survived it. I paid for lift gate service, and what I got was a freaking joke. A joke UPS will continue to perpetuate. Unfortuantely, we as consumers are kind of stuck with it, cause if the drivers will not bring their trucks in to our loading docks, which by the way I do have, and they won’t bring their trucks to our garages, we kind of screwed.

Now on the plus side, the shipment did arrive without any major damage. The table saw box did take a major hit on the backside leaving a 6” diameter hole in it and a corner of the box completely knocked apart, but cause of the way things were packed on pallets there was no sign the machine itself was impacted. I’ll have more to report on this as we go, not all “shipping damage” is necessarily visible when inspecting cartons. Of all the cartons which arrived, The 9 by UPS Freight and the dozen or so by standard UPS, only one shows major problems, and that one was by standard UPS, I haven’t got into that one yet, but the top of the box was ripped open and parts were hanging out of it. Not sure what that one is yet, but I think it the extention for the mobile base on the table saw. I’ll find out soon as it warms up a bit and I’ve had breakfast.

Last night I did assemble the dust collector, my next post will be about that. It has issues. Stay tuned.

View Clint Searl's profile

Clint Searl

1427 posts in 995 days


#7 posted 660 days ago

Nice list, but the proof of the pudding is what you make with them. Looking forward to seeing your projects.

-- Clint Searl.............We deserve what we tolerate

View Whiskers's profile

Whiskers

389 posts in 660 days


#8 posted 660 days ago

Right now the project is to get the shop up, that a major undertaking. Tools in boxes and crates do little good.

View toolie's profile

toolie

1742 posts in 1262 days


#9 posted 660 days ago

welcome to the forum and congrats on some wise purchases. not sure i agree with the money spent on the ZCI and the dado set. at least you avoided the jet/powermatic trap of overpriced yet underperforming tools. that kind of a haul from the WMH tool group would have probably cost twice as much and delivered half the value. let’s see some pics as it all comes together. besides, if you’ve been lurking around here for as long as you say you have, then you know the rule..no pics, didn’t happen.

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112016 posts in 2210 days


#10 posted 660 days ago

Welcome to Ljs Again

Looks like you have a great start as far as equipment goes,I hope you have all of you power ready to rock and roll for all that great stuff. It will be interesting to see how every thing comes together,perhaps a blog is in order? Good luck with all that unpacking an cleaning,that’s the part I dislike most about new equipment .

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Tennessee's profile

Tennessee

1447 posts in 1148 days


#11 posted 660 days ago

Well, Whiskers, welcome to the best woodworking forum on the web.
I also have a few Grizzly tools, as well as many others, they perform well as a whole. You should not have many problems, once everything gets assembled and positioned.

Any ideas on what you think you might like to build, and what kinds of woods you prefer?

I see you live in Athens, Alabama. I’m not that far from you, in Cleveland, Tennessee. The head estimator at my part-time sales job used to be a model builder for the team in Huntsville – he remembers it fondly. He got out in time and pursued a successful career as an HVAC man with his brother in Chattanooga, before part-time retirement. Now he sold off his business and just estimates.
We all have something we are fairly good at here with wood, mine is wooden things with curves in them. I build guitars and bandsaw jewelry boxes, which you can see in my projects.

You do realize you are probably entering the wood market at one of the worst possible times, with the disposable income so low, as you well know, being close to the NASA program as you were. I agree with you totally, it was one of the worst decisions in recent decades, considering how many wonderful things came out of that program.

Good luck, and keep posting, reading, and when you finally put that first project together, post it and join the fun!

-- Paul, Tennessee, http://www.tsunamiguitars.com

View Woodbum's profile

Woodbum

433 posts in 1699 days


#12 posted 659 days ago

Welcome to LJ’s and to the not so exclusive club of woodworkers. Livin the dream that most of us have had; to spend 5 large on tools at one time. Like Hal stated, I too accumulated all of my stuff a little at a time over many years. I am glad that you were able to buy all of the ursus arctos horribilis tools. I have a Griz cabinet saw and stationary oscillating spindle sander with a new 8” joiner on the way. I have some Jet, Powermatic, Delta and Dewalt stationary tools too, and the Griz stuff matches the others in the fit, finish and functionality all the way. You will not be disappointed with your new products. Now build something! But first, let me caution you in the safety department. Read all of the safety manuals, articles, reviews and any other stuff you can lay your paws on before you plug in anything. These bears will bite, very quickly and very hard. Set them up right and get some safety gear and start slowly. Woodworking has taught patience to this Type A personality geezer over the years. When using your new equipment remember this motto: If what are you are doing seems to maybe be dangerous, then it probably is…STOP. Good luck with what will become your new addiction.

-- Improvidus, Apto quod Victum-- Improvise, Adapt, Overcome

View Bill White's profile (online now)

Bill White

3418 posts in 2594 days


#13 posted 659 days ago

Welcome, and hope ya enjoy the Grizz tooling.
Just a point of interest:
If you should have any probs other than ordering, etc., deal with Grizz TECH SERVICES. Not a toll free number, but you’ll talk with someone who’ll REALLY help you through any issue about the machines.
My lathe, band saw, and table saw are Grizz, and I couldn’t be more pleased unless I could find a super rich uncle. ‘Course they’re all dead now.
Mississippi here, so we’re not that far on the map.
Keep on postin’.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View Whiskers's profile

Whiskers

389 posts in 660 days


#14 posted 657 days ago

Thought I would update a bit for you guys. Got the dust collector assembled. Overall not a bad experience. Even though there was no damage to the cartons, The dust collector did take some damage somewhere. Possibly in the manufacture and packing stage since the type hits I saw would have ruffled the box if it occured in shipping. The main unit has a large flange on the top which had a corner dented down. This was the worse, but it wasn’t anything a redneck with a pair of vice grips couldn’t straighten out. Fortunately another large flange piece fits over top of this one so the cracked paint etc associated with the damage and repair is completely invisible. The other hit was on the underside of the large round band that the cannister and bag are attached to. Again, a little work with those vice grips was able to take care of it. For the most part it assembled fairly easily, but if I had it to do over again I would have a few taps available and run through the bolt holes cause especially on one piece none of the threads were cut well. At one point I had to make one of the bolts sacrificial and use it going thru the backside to cut the threads out of the piece before I could get the pieces bolted together. It takes up a lot less room now that it assembled than when it was in 2 boxes. I plugged it in and thru the switch but unfortunately nothing, and I do mean nothing, happened. At this moment though, I can’t swear that the plug I put it into is even live. I’ve never used it. It was late, so I didn’t even bother checking the breaker box yet, but I’ll get around to that and post a update.

Most of today I spent unpacking all the myriad of smaller boxes and inventoring and inspecting parts for damage as I don’t want to have to wait until I’m assembling something to discover something was wrong, plus all those boxes hanging out the front of my garage I’m afraid are a temptation to thieves. Of all the things on that order only one thing was missing, and it was the cheapest thing I had ordered. 2 2” wire clamps for dust hoses. As for parts quality, inventoring and inspecting the pieces of the shop fox mobile platforms, both units had 1 fixed caster that was faulty in the same manner. They have outer plastic bushings around the wheels and these were shattered on one side. I called the bear’s tech people and they said no problem, they will ship replacements for these parts right away.

While not related to this order, just a honorable mention, also today I received a Bosch 1” Rotary Hammer. (I know, off topic, not woodworking). Well I plugged it in and it fires up fine, so no problems seen there so far, but when I opened the paperwork envelope, instead of finding a owners manual for a Bosch Rotary Hammer I found a manual for a dremel moto tool. The warranty card and calling card etc were for a Rotary Hammer though, so it wasn’t just someone putting the wrong packet in. Well a toll free call to Bosch has a manual heading my way, and in the meantime the lady walked me thru the few things I needed to really know to work the thing, so just wanted to mention looks like Bosch has good tech support.

View Whiskers's profile

Whiskers

389 posts in 660 days


#15 posted 656 days ago

Hello again folks, no one has made any replies since my last post, hope someone is reading and cares about my opinion, don’t need a flood of posts but would appreciate someone saying something now and than.

Got busy again tonight, Unpacked the Bandsaw stand box, and assembled it. Kudos to grizzly for what seems a very easy to assemble and sturdy stand.

I also assembled one of the shop fox mobile bases which their website recommends to buy along with this stand. BAD BEAR! I’d whack the grizzly bear on the nose with a newspaper but not sure if that wise. First off, the stand doesn’t exactly fit, collapsed to it’s smallest size it is actually a little large for the bandsaw. Increases the footprint of the tool by a good bit. Than again, I am concerned with the fact the bandsaw is going to be very top heavy, and tippy. Considering the line is connected, this would be forgiveable if there was a way to attach the stand to the saws stand without modifications. would have just taken a holes drilled in key places. Also the mobile stand is kind of kludgy in design especially in the way the rails are attached. The recommendations for which bolts to use where are also backwards. Your given some short bolts and some longer bolts, 2 sets of 16, and they tell you to use the short bolts on the casters and the long ones on the rails. Well that leaves the long bolts sticking way up in the air on the rails looking tacky as hell, and in the case of the fixed casters, a pain in the butt to get the nuts started. If your setting up a 691 or the 1023rlx, your kind of stuck with the shop fox mobile bases cause of the available extention, but for any other tool I have to say, I recommend using another brand or building your own base. Fortunately for me, as some may notice I ordered 4 nice casters along with all that miscellaneous junk in this order. Tomorrow night, I’m going to rig up a mobile base for the bandsaw stand, something that will look neater, and nicer, and will make it less tippy.

View Whiskers's profile

Whiskers

389 posts in 660 days


#16 posted 656 days ago

Oh, I forgot to mention this, So far, there is no sign of a manual in the shipment for the bandsaw. I read a review of another brands bandsaw which said the manual was Underneath the huge heavy piece that came, and it wasn’t found until the people had pretty much got the thing assembled, and this may be the case again, since all this stuff tends to made in the same place. If so, I think that rather stupid, would think the Chinese and
Grizzyly would be smarter than that. Fortunately Grizzly does offer all manuals online for download, and I had downloaded manuals for everything before I ordered. Part of my research.

View patron's profile

patron

13018 posts in 1974 days


#17 posted 656 days ago

one of the good things
about doing the assembly yourself

you get familiar with the tool itself
as you get to see it from all different perspectives

most tools need some tweaking
so it’s good to know that
makes it easier to keep them in running order

i put carter guides on my older saw
and even though they were specified for my machine
one hole in the machine itself was about 1/16” off
so get a drill and move it over
(fortunately it had nuts
and i didn’t need to thread the hole)

rather than sending things back
and waiting for some new one

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

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Whiskers

389 posts in 660 days


#18 posted 656 days ago

That the way i look at things, repair it and move on. Note my review of the dust collector and the damage sections regarding bent metal. A redneck with a pair of vice grips can perform miracles that many wouldn’t even think about.

View patron's profile

patron

13018 posts in 1974 days


#19 posted 656 days ago

them and a good hammer

if and when you do call teck support
you actually know what you are talking about

then they need to listen better
and are more helpful

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

5428 posts in 2009 days


#20 posted 656 days ago

Any luck firing up that DC?

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

6926 posts in 1547 days


#21 posted 656 days ago

Whiskers: RE bandsaw…”... First off, the stand doesn’t exactly fit, collapsed to it’s smallest size it is actually a little large for the bandsaw. Increases the footprint of the tool by a good bit. Than again, I am concerned with the fact the bandsaw is going to be very top heavy, and tippy….”

I actually cut a larger footprint double thickness piece of 3/4” ply when I put my BS on a mobile base. Works like a champ and MUCH more stable. Plus it allowed me to open the cabinet door on my unit (Rikon 10-325).

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View AandCstyle's profile

AandCstyle

1288 posts in 890 days


#22 posted 656 days ago

I find it really interesting that there are two concurrent threads regarding large Grizzly purchases. In this thread, Whiskers is working through the tools and issues and seemingly enjoying the process. In the other thread which references a CL ad from Richmond, the purchaser was totally frustrated by all the “junk” worth scrap metal prices that he wants to sell and order new machinery from a different manufacturer.

I rarely see Grizzly as having the “best in class” tools, but I often see them as being the “best value”.

-- Art

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Whiskers

389 posts in 660 days


#23 posted 656 days ago

AandC, I guess expectations have a lot to do with it. I knew going in that Grizzly wasn’t on top of the heap in quality, and that there would be some issues to deal with. I’ve been reading about Grizzly for a couple years here and in other forums. Their tools have a good reputation for being functional and great bang for the buck, but they are Chinese or Taiwanese made. Most everything I bought was supposed to have come from Taiwan, which supposedly is a little better than China, but when shipping 500+ lbs of something overseas to the states, little mishaps are to be expected and life is easier if you just fix them and move on rather than raise a fuss. Overall I’ve been very happy so far, I’ve gotten what I expected.

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Whiskers

389 posts in 660 days


#24 posted 651 days ago

I thought maybe a liittle update on the progress of things in my shop. Last night I made some additions to my shop which had nothing to do with Grizzly. The first was I received another Blu-Ray player from Amazon. What’s really neat about this is it is WiFi capable and it plays all the videos I’ve downloaded over the years seamlessly from my computer. After all, you can’t have a fully functional woodshop without a good entertainment system.

The 2nd was I made a venture into the city and paid Harbor Freight a little visit. Picked up a few small items and a US General, Black, 3 (really 2 and 2 half) drawer rollaround cart for $120. Let me tell you, this thing is well made and spacious. I’ve grown tired of scattering tools and heavy tool boxes around my garage. I always wanted one of those big rollaround chests with all the drawers but couldn’t justify the expense, nor did I have that many tools. This is perfect, plenty of room for all my mechanic type tools, and it has a bottom shelf that will hold many other tools or tool chests. I thorougly recommend it.

Tonight I got to work on the jointer. This thing is built like a freaking tank. I had to get creative in mounting the motor since I was by myself. The instructions say to have one person hold the motor and another tip the base up on it’s side, than place the motor on the motor mounts. Hmm, one slight problem, There no other person here. Time for some Redneck ingenuity. I cut a piece of binders twine about 3 foot long, tied one end to a part of the stand, and than threaded the other end thru a mounting hole and than thru the motors corresponding mounting hole, than tied a simple half hitch. Than I lifted the motor roughly into place and quickly with one hand grabbed the free end of the twine and pulled the slack out of the hitch, Weight mostly supported now all I had to do was add a 2nd hitch. Now the motor was secured close to in place, Threaded the twine again thru the 2nd hole in the motor mount and motor and this time made a very tight tie in so the motor was really held in place. Now it dangling by binders twine roughly in place and I was able to stand the stand on it’s side as instructed, and than install the motor. First putting the bolts in the holes not occupied by binders twine, than removing the twine of course I bolted the other side. The rest was quick, and simple, not much to do there really. Than I hit a little snag with Grizzlys directions. It said, “using lifting straps with the forklift”, okay, a quick check of the box revealed Grizzly neglected to send me the forklift. Not sure what I’m going to do now. Got a neighbor down the road who has a tractor with this thing he uses to move those big huge round bales of hay with. It has 3 prongs, 2 real low to the ground and one up high. I’m going to pay him a visit and see if maybe we can’t use that to put the massivly huge and heavy main piece on the stand.

View AandCstyle's profile

AandCstyle

1288 posts in 890 days


#25 posted 651 days ago

I use a 1 ton shop crane that I got at HF for a little over $100 IIRC. There must have been a sale or a coupon involved. Anyhow, I don’t use it often, but it is a lifesaver when I need it. FWIW

-- Art

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Whiskers

389 posts in 660 days


#26 posted 650 days ago

That’s commonly called a engine hoist around here, and can be rented for about $28 a day. That a option. If I could pick one up for $100 I’d do it in a heart beat rather than rent. Listed at $180 right now, i’ll have to watch the HF for a deal on that. Odd there are no reviews on it.

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

6926 posts in 1547 days


#27 posted 650 days ago

I think I paid ~$40 for my HF 1-ton hoist roughly 2 1/2 years ago.

Here you go. They are now $49.99
http://www.harborfreight.com/garage-shop/hoists/1-ton-chain-hoist-996.html

Click Image for full view:

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

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AandCstyle

1288 posts in 890 days


#28 posted 650 days ago

Mike, that is a good option IF your ceiling rafters will support the weight. I would think that most shops/garages would not have that strength. However, you might be able to lay a pipe or beam across several rafters to distribute the load safely for short duration operations. In my case, the drywall on the ceiling precluded that option.

-- Art

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112016 posts in 2210 days


#29 posted 650 days ago

when unpacking and moving my Grizzly 12” jointer I used pry bars and stacks of wood to get the jointer up high enough to get the pallet out from under the 1000lb jointer. When high enough I slipped a 4×4 under each end of the jointer with stacks of wood under each side of the 4×4 and slid the pallet out and then I slid two miniature dolly’s sold buy HF(rated at 1000LBs each) on each end and those have served as my mobile base every since for at least the last 3 years. You may be able to stand your jointer up the same way by put blocks under one side until it’s high enough to lift upright. This kind of technique is a bit scary so it’s not for the faint of heart. Try this at your own risk ,I just no it worked for me.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

6926 posts in 1547 days


#30 posted 650 days ago

Yeah, I have an 8in I-Beam running across the center of my 24×30 metal building/shop. Perfect setup for me. Strengthening the rafters is a good idea, of AT LEAST check your capability regarding lifting strength. Thanks for bringing that point up.

Additionally, just because the hoist says “1-Ton”, that doesn’t mean you have to lift that much with it. My TS is ~600lb and is the heaviest piece that I will ever need to lift.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

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Straightbowed

717 posts in 931 days


#31 posted 650 days ago

yes grizzly is good it loves to munch on wood

-- Stevo, work in tha city woodshop in the country

View Whiskers's profile

Whiskers

389 posts in 660 days


#32 posted 647 days ago

Hey again to anyone following, today was a good day. I closed my garage door and everything important is inside, which is very important to me. My redneck ingenuity definately worked overtime today. I started by unboxing that Jointer top which was sitting straddling half my garage entrance, half in and half out, blocking anything from happening. The crate from the jointer was only a small problem really, the real problem was the pallet they put it on. The main top piece of the jointer is heavy, but it is not unmanageable. Two normal young healthy men could pick it up and they could place it on the stand. It not the type of thing the OSHA people would recommend but believe me I’ve moved worse when I was younger. Unfortunately I’m 53, so I don’t qualify as a normal healthy young male. Of course I first stripped the box of the smaller parts and put them away. Than I slid the crate to the edge of the pallet. Than to deal with the monster piece I unbolted it from it’s crate (one of the nuts didn’t make it here) and slid it to the edge of the crate and pallet. I took one of them shop fox bases and wheeled it up next to the crate than worked the main piece over on to it. Turned out to not be that difficult to do. Once on wheels, in the garage it went and away went the pallets and crate. YAY! Than it was a simple matter to move the Bandsaw top box and all into the garage now that it was out of the way and I had all that room, and than another stinking pallet left the area. In front of my garage is still a mess with wood from crates and pallets, but it much better now and the garage door is closed.

I spent awhile dealing with the wood from the shipment, Of course one concern was all the exposed nails, Those had to be disposed of and made safe, but I also kind of was hoping for some jewels in the palets or something. Nothing, the wood is HORRIBLE! I’ve never seen wood so prone to shattering and splitting. It super light colored and has no strength at all. I don’t know but suspect it may be this horrible rubber wood that the Taiwanese are flooding our country with in the furniture we getting. It totally white in color, has no discernable grain pattern, and is super soft. Got frustrated and decided to move on for now.

Went shopping, bought groceries, beer, and about $60 worth of hardware including 3 6’ sections of chain, some 1/4×5” eyebolts and those things that are not carabingers but are like chain links with a side that screws together for joining chain. As it turns out, I’ve always had some lifting equipment, but not really a way to use them here. As someone earlier quoted, most people may not have joists that can handle it. In earlier houses, I didn’t worry about it, I mounted the things and jerked engines out of cars without worry. This garage has them engineered funky joists. I don’t know enough about them or trust them enough to go cutting holes into them and threading chains and lifting equipment thru them. But, that redneck mind was at work. I think I’ve found a solution, something I already have, will cost me nothing more. Not going into detail on that now, will follow with pictures etc, I know it will work for the jointer, the bandsaw is a bit trickier but it should work. Getting the table saw off it’s 2 pallets, well the rig not a problem but getting the chains in place is tricky.

Dealing with large pieces of equipment is one thing, but dealing with all the wasted space from the pallets they come on is another.

Stay tuned to see a rednecks vice grip version of a gantry crane.

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Whiskers

389 posts in 660 days


#33 posted 639 days ago

Sorry I haven’t updated anything, but it’s gotten chilly here in North Alabama and That has kept me out of the garage the last few days.

I do have a interesting new acquisition though, Yesterday I got a Camel alert on the Powermatic 2000 dust filtration machine. Seems Amazon had dropped it’s price to $365, which put it right in line with Rockler’s similiar model. I suspect the Rockler model is the same thing with different paint job and end pieces but can’t be sure as noone has really looked into that. Rockler dropped the price on the Powermatic version as well to the same level, but they wanted $65 extra for shipping where Amazon offered Free super saver shipping. Okay, that’s a no brainer. The amazing thing is, I ordered this yesterday, by 5pm I got a message saying it shipped. Well that don’t mean much, but to see where it coming from and figure out when it well get here I checked the tracking. It said, order ready for UPS, Decatur Alabama. Huh? Amazon don’t have no freaking distribution centers in Alabama! Today I checked and there was one new entry, on truck for delivery. It in my garage now! Driver had no idea where it came from, the only thing I can think of is Amazon must have had Captain Kirk teleport it onto one of their local trucks.

This thing will probably go to the top of the queue in being installed since it goes overhead and will free floor space and my garage is very dusty as it is. Not sure How I’m going to get it up onto the cieling but I’ll figure something out. How I’m mounting it, well that part is easy. Guess I’ll be going to the hardware store in the next couple days.

I also ordered a set of Emerson stainless steel combination squares. I have a combination square but frankly it’s older than I am, and due to the elements the gradiant markings are illegilble. I went with the Emersons cause they have very decent ratings overall, and they weren’t too expensive at around $12-15 a pop. No way I could justify to myself a Starret. I have no idea what that thing I got is, but it is great for making square lines, just can’t measure with it.

Another item I ordered was the deluxe U-line-it system from Peachtree. That a rather expensive tool but looks like it would be good for getting things really tuned up. Not many places sell it though. It has superb reviews everywhere and cause of all the black friday stuff Peachtree sent me a 10% off and free shipping offer so I bit. The camel told me the price of this thing never goes down, it never on sale, so I figured grab the 10% and free shipping and run.

I’m looking for a set of Machinist squares for trueing table and band saw blade angles etc, but am confused a bit on those. Would love some feedback. Grizzly has a set for $18 plus shipping that I think would probably work for me, only negative is they have no graduation markings and some say they aren’t truly square. But I wonder how square they really need to be for woodwork as opposed to machine shop work. This seems to be the split in the ratings on that set. Woodworkers love them for the price and functionality, machinist hate them. I found another company who has a set of Pec for about $50, which is a respected brand i hear and the stated specs are good. Again no gradiant markings. The Pec set also comes in plastic case. It would be nice to have markings but for setting blade height I can always use the new combo squares. Anyway, If anyone wishes to point me somewhere or give me feedback on the machinist or engineers squares, that would be great.

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AandCstyle

1288 posts in 890 days


#34 posted 639 days ago

Relative to the machinist squares, I have read a number of times that the plastic triangles that you buy in an office type store are dead on for accuracy. Their advantages are that they are very inexpensive and you get 30, 60 and 90* angles. HTH

-- Art

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Whiskers

389 posts in 660 days


#35 posted 639 days ago

hmm, hadn’t thought about that, I think I even have one of those around in a box somewhere, part of the things my father gave me when I was a child and making models so it would be American made. My father was a engineer by trade, and I loved making balsa models and would get plans from library books for planes. Problem was they were shrunk down and not real usable. He taught me drafting techniques to blow them back up into proper size and gave me a bunch of tools like french curve, compass, tri ruler (don’t know tech name for that), and one of those things you described. I’ll have to look for it. Doubt they even teach that old school drafting stuff anymore in colleges since we have computers that can scan and do it all for you. I knew more about drafting when I was 10 than most adults ever learn. Not that I’m claiming to be a drafter, lol, I just made and flew model airplanes when i was a kid.

He also taught me a technique using a compass or any fixed point tool for drawing a perfect 90 degree angle anywhere. I’ve used it to install gatage door openers more than once using string rather than a compass. Point is I can use that technique to draw lines, than check the lines for perfect square.

Thanks AndC you may have saved me some bucks. Opened my eyes into another way of looking at the problem.

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Whiskers

389 posts in 660 days


#36 posted 622 days ago

Well guys, I finally got everything together and built my portable gantry crane today. Once I had everything I needed it assembled quite easily. My biggiest concern was cutting some angle iron but I remembered to get some fresh new bits for my jig saw and they went thru it like butter. Tomorrow I’m going to put it all together and raise that huge Jointer top onto it’s stand, and when I do I’ll try and take some pictures of it in action. Let’s see if I can post a picture of the heart of this sucker.

Here’s a side view. That’s a old cheap harbor freight hoist I picked up a few years ago on sale and never have used. Going to be nice to see it in action and earning it’s keep. It’s got a 1.5 HP motor on it or so it claims, I hear HF tends to lie about the power of their motors but it beefy enough I think it will handle anything I plan to throw at it. I’m no engineer and wouldn’t want to guess at what the limit of that beam is, but I’m sure it can handle these machines.

Also for those that asked before, on that dust collector, Grizzly did send me a dud. I checked my circuits and they are live and working, than I opened up the switch box on the dust collector. The back half of the switch was easy to remove and when I did all these little metal parts just fell out in my hand. Way to go Bear! No way that thing could have been right. Looking at the construction of the thing, I’ve decided to not even bother with fooling with Grizzly about this cause this switch is obviously a piece of junk. It’s also some kind of stupid government approved safety paddle crap that can only lead to trouble down the line. A standard rocker switch should fit in it’s place just fine, unfortunately noone around here carries such a critter. I found a single pole rocker switch but no double poles, and this really needs a double pole since it 220V. Closes place I’ve found one is 40 miles away. I will probably just mail order one from somewhere and save the gas. Graingers has one (same place that is 40 miles away) for only $10.

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Whiskers

389 posts in 660 days


#37 posted 425 days ago

It been a long time since I posted here on this but I thought I would I’m really disappointed with Grizzly, They are now 0 for 3 of the major components I bought from them and implemented. and I still have more to go. I been rather slow getting things going cause I had another little round of medical problems and I also really needed a hand putting this stuff together.

Failure one, as reported the dust collector switch was a disaster. When I called Grizzly I got a total jerk who told me to cut all the wires an splice them to prove the switch was at fault. Well the Chinese don’t exactly give you a lot of extra wire in there for service and that seemed really stupid, especially after the internal components fell apart in my hand when I removed it and opened it. I ordered a ordinary toggle switch to replace the crappy safety crap design they had in it and now the dust collector works great. First time I used my new Ridgid oscillating sander without dust collection it made a huge cloud in my garage, Than I got the proper fittings and it is now a favorite tool.

2nd Failure, The shop fox mobile stands, I bought 2 of them, one for the table saw and another for the band saw. I assembled the band saws stand, but not the saw, yet, and the mobile stand does not fit it, it is too small. They push this base for the saw but it won’t fit. It too small. In addition 2 of the coasters in these stands were defective Now this time when I called Grizzly I got a good guy and he shipped replacement casters right away. No Bullsihit. So I’ll forgive them this one.

Now, 3rd Strike, Today I finally got the needed help I needed to assemble the jointer. My little gantry crane setup worked great and me and my hired kid were able to assemble quite quickly and easily until, It was time to connect the belt. The freaking pulley is missing from the cutterhead assembly. This is not a part that comes separately. It supposed to be on the machine. Even odder, in the oddball parts they sent me is the shaft key for that pulley. Hey, I could live with the pulley not being mounted, and having to do that, but No pulley is a killer. It a 500 lb paper weight at the moment. God I hope when I call them Monday I don’t get that jerk who wanted to cut up the wire in the dust collector.

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