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View richard2345's profile

Best way to reduce width of panel door

by richard2345
posted 629 days ago


20 replies so far

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

6915 posts in 1515 days


#1 posted 629 days ago

Just how much are you trying to reduce the width? If it just a fraction of an inch or so running it across the jointer may not be out of consideration. More than that, then maybe use a circular saw to make an initial rip and then clean it up with either the Power jointer or a #6 or #7 jointer hand plane. My 2-cents

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View casual1carpenter's profile

casual1carpenter

353 posts in 1077 days


#2 posted 629 days ago

richard2345, Depending on the amount you need to remove if you decide to simply cut a portion of the rails there was posted on LJ’s a tracksaw type alternative saw guide.

something like this might work. there are lots of other references / forum topics this is but one.
http://lumberjocks.com/projects/29056

Although it should use two clean straight factory edges I believe one factory or better edge is required for the saw guide edge, the actual cut edge is created by your saw itself as it is guided along the straight factory edge.

View Cosmicsniper's profile

Cosmicsniper

2199 posts in 1760 days


#3 posted 629 days ago

Mike nailed it. Rough cut to within 1/8” with a circ saw and guide. Then, trim to finished dimension with either a jointer or hand plane.

-- jay, www.allaboutastro.com

View Cosmicsniper's profile

Cosmicsniper

2199 posts in 1760 days


#4 posted 629 days ago

BTW, I’d run a metal detector over the joints of that door. You just never know.

-- jay, www.allaboutastro.com

View Loren's profile

Loren

7258 posts in 2249 days


#5 posted 629 days ago

Easy and accurate don’t always play well together,
but the old way of getting there is a bit slower
and plenty accurate. Cut the part out rough,
then refine the shape with a finer cutting tool.

You can snap a line and rip it down with a sawsall,
jigsaw or circular saw. Stay to the right of the line
a little and fix the edge with a hand plane or
electric planer.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View  Box 's profile (online now)

Box

4937 posts in 1910 days


#6 posted 629 days ago

I have used a method of trimming the width of doors that I found to be very easy. I used a piece if 3/4 plywood that was laying arouns my shop. It was 6” wide and 8 ft long. I used it as a straight edge guide for my circular saw. I marked the point where I wanted the cut and them measured 3” from there to clamp the plywood to the door. I used 3 inches because this was the distance from my circular saw plate edge to the outside of ther blade.

I have used this many times and it is accurate and easy.

View richard2345's profile

richard2345

20 posts in 701 days


#7 posted 629 days ago

Thanks for all the replies!

Horizontal – I need to take about 3/4 inch off both sides. If I rip a stile with a circular saw, say, by hand, and I get the side out of square with rails, how would I be able to get the stile back into square with the rail? My guess would be a hand plane would be more effective than a power jointer (I have a 6” powermatic) because I could check for square as I go. What do you think?

casual: thanks for the link! I checked out that technique, and I think I understand how to make that jig. If I can’t be reasonably assured I can bring the stiles into square with the rails using the other methods, I’ll make that jig.

Jay – roger the metal detector. Depending on how many of these floor joists i mill down, it may be worth the investment. Their a great source of thick lumber that I’m hoping will be not warp when out in the elements.

Loren: i admire your confidence with a circular saw :)

Greg: I will experiment with your technique as well.

Thanks all for the great tips!

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

6915 posts in 1515 days


#8 posted 629 days ago

_”...Horizontal – I need to take about 3/4 inch off both sides. If I rip a stile with a circular saw, say, by hand, and I get the side out of square with rails, how would I be able to get the stile back into square with the rail? My guess would be a hand plane would be more effective than a power jointer (I have a 6” powermatic) because I could check for square as I go. What do you think?...”

Yes, but not always. It is possible that a power jointer could correct this (how close are you paying attention?). And a hand plane jointer surely could (but again HOW CLOSE are you paying attention?). Your power of observation is important here, do not overlook that aspect. Final fitting is about finesse, and yes, you could screw up. Pay attention. Either method can result in excellent results. What ever you are comfortable with.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View RussellAP's profile

RussellAP

2938 posts in 888 days


#9 posted 629 days ago

Pictures would help.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

View richard2345's profile

richard2345

20 posts in 701 days


#10 posted 628 days ago

I will take some pics and post them next time I get home and it’s not already dark!! Hopefully I’ll have some time to continue working on Thursday.

View 404 - Not Found's profile

404 - Not Found

2544 posts in 1571 days


#11 posted 628 days ago

What effect will it have on the lock if you rip 3/4” off the stile? Just one more thing to consider.

View richard2345's profile

richard2345

20 posts in 701 days


#12 posted 628 days ago

Renners: Good point. I haven’t bought the lockset yet, but the door already has a box-type slot cut in the side. I will probably have to fill the opening with wood before I start planing and then re-drill the door when I purchase the new lockset.

View GregD's profile

GregD

606 posts in 1738 days


#13 posted 628 days ago

To clean up long cuts on large pieces I use a straight edge to guide a router with a straight bit. If you need to be precise, attach the straight edge to a piece of 1/8” hardboard and trim the hardboard with the router/bit combination you intend to use so that the edge of the hardboard indicates the cut line.

Rough cut to within about 1/8” of the final cut line and remove the rest with the router.

-- Greg D.

View Wdwerker's profile

Wdwerker

331 posts in 835 days


#14 posted 628 days ago

Greg has the right idea! Be aware that if the router tips it will cut a divot in the edge of your door. I have jointed 8 ft boards for a tabletop with a straightedge and a router. If you take tiny shaving cuts there is less resistance to pushing the router.

-- Fine Custom Woodwork since 1978

View Cosmicsniper's profile

Cosmicsniper

2199 posts in 1760 days


#15 posted 628 days ago

Richard…I’m not sure why you lack confidence in the circ saw. Setup a guide/fence that is square to the top or bottom of the door and let ‘er rip. Make sure you use the guide in a position to protect the door should the blade wander. Take small passes if you need. Make sure the guide sits snug to the door’s surface so that the saw’s base doesn’t sneak under the guide. Just don’t cut to the line. From that point a hand plane can slowly sneak you up to where you want it. Just be sure the door frame is solid wood and not veneered, else the plane might tear out the edges of the veneer.

-- jay, www.allaboutastro.com

View Cosmicsniper's profile

Cosmicsniper

2199 posts in 1760 days


#16 posted 628 days ago

Yeah, good point, Greg. That’s another great option. I would run a support board parallel to the door frame to prevent the router from tipping.

-- jay, www.allaboutastro.com

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

1156 posts in 898 days


#17 posted 628 days ago

Wow – a lot of overthinking. Clamp on a straightedge – cut with circular saw or trim saw with fine blade – sand or plane.

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

6675 posts in 1285 days


#18 posted 628 days ago

Snap a cut line. Set Circ. saw for a bevel of 2-3 degrees, the side that enters the jamb first will get the beveled part. Either clamp a straightedge , or just follow the line. LEAVE the line! Cut to the outside of the line!. With the door set up in a “door vise” ( look up ways to build one, comes in handy when working on doors) and either power plane to the line, or handplane to the line. Maintain the bevel as your finish up the edge.

Was on a Com. Job one year (97) that had over 40 doors to install, and just two days to do it. NO time was wasted on anything. Get them in the frames, install the hardware ( including closures on half of them) and have them ready for the “Painter Crew” to come in and finish them. Yep, they finished them hanging in place! two eight hour days, one guy, and I even got a lunch break on both days…

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View joeyinsouthaustin's profile

joeyinsouthaustin

1213 posts in 674 days


#19 posted 627 days ago

You can always rip the door in half, then rip it to dimension on the table saw, join it back together using dowels, biscuits, and tite bond III, then you will preserve the style width and the hardware and hinge mortises…...just make sure not the glue the expansion out of the panels…....

It seems backwards, but why not explore all options. :)

Reading that it seems like a lot of work, but I have done it several times in homes where it was easier and cheaper than tracking down the knives to re do the doors.

-- Who is John Galt?

View Al Killian's profile

Al Killian

85 posts in 1227 days


#20 posted 625 days ago

I use a peice of angle iron for a straight edge. Cut it with a circular saw then with a flush trim router bit. This will leave a nice surface for painting.

-- Owner of custom millwork shop

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