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Lathe of your Dreams

by terryR
posted 11-04-2012 at 05:50 AM


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453 replies so far

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ShaneA

5290 posts in 1235 days


#101 posted 11-12-2012 at 05:15 PM

Well…I have been looking, reading, and watching all things lathe. As I begin to narrow in on a purchase strategy, I am still somewhat lost as to what features are most important and worth the extra costs. It looks like Jet, Nova, Grizzly all have lathes that I could, in theory buy. Havent waded through all the reviews yet. Still deciding on how much I want/need to spend. The Nova1624-44 lathe seems to have a lot of nice features. Reverse, slow speed options, and 1 1/2 hp, decent capacity, add on doo dads. It is a more than I really want to spend, but could swing it, if that is where the value is. The Grizzly 0462 catches my eye due to price. Has a 2hp motor, but doesnt look to have reverse and doesnt really have a low speed option ( I think 700 is the lowest) but is like $600 plus freight. Jet has a couple options, one at like $1200 and one at $900. 1hp and 3/4hp respectively. Gets down to 450 rpms, no reverse.

I am not sure if my eyes are bigger than my stomach on this one. My next turning will be my first. Mostly I see handles, knobs, small things in my future…but then also drawn to segmented, bowls, and platters. No interest in long spindle type things. So I would hate to buy a midi, then need/want something full size. But, maybe…a midi would do. It is not like I actually have room for this thing, so I am in my usual tool paralysis mode.

Are the Novas a step up, and a tool that could one for a while? Is the Grizzly a waste of money? Should I just buy a cheaper midi until I actually know what I am doing and what I need? Have I asked too many questions???? Any insight would be appreciated from the turners of the world.

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thedude50

3514 posts in 1115 days


#102 posted 11-12-2012 at 06:18 PM

I want to turn big bowls too and my current lathe meets Why I decided to buy the big powermatic is simple I want to turn large vessels. My current lathe is a great beginner lathe it is the most copied lathe made it is the jet jl1236 It has plenty of power but i dont recall the rating and i am not going down to the shop to check. The more bowls I turn the bigger I want to turn. So I asked my friends at Powermatic to send me the media kit on the new big lathe I read and watched all the video and know it is huge I WONT EVER NEED BIGGER AND I TRUST powermatic. I was sold on the Powermatic system. I know the Quality because I HAVE SEVERAL Powermatic tools now and I like them all very much.

-- when I am not on Lumberjocks I am on @ http://thisoldworkshop.com where we allow free speech

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ART LACKEY

105 posts in 2016 days


#103 posted 11-12-2012 at 07:08 PM

My dream lathe is a HAPFO AP 5000 copy lathe. they cost anywhere from 40 to 100 thousand and are very accurate. I found one for 800 bucks and put alot of time into refurb and the result is sweet! Now in retirement,I can work for contractors etc and make money

-- IF YOU GIVE A MAN A FISH,YOU FEED HIM FOR A DAY,BUT IF YOU TEACH HIM HOW TO FISH---HE'LL SIT IN A BOAT AND DRINK BEER ALL DAY!

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ART LACKEY

105 posts in 2016 days


#104 posted 11-12-2012 at 07:12 PM

Since this picture was taken,an inverter was installed to change from 3phase to single phase and a ac drive motor was installed to move the cutter assembly up and down the bed.I will try to post a video in the future. if you want a copy of an existing turning it will do it very easily,and as many as you want. It has paid for it’s self already and as soon as the economy turns around maybe make a living at it.

-- IF YOU GIVE A MAN A FISH,YOU FEED HIM FOR A DAY,BUT IF YOU TEACH HIM HOW TO FISH---HE'LL SIT IN A BOAT AND DRINK BEER ALL DAY!

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Gshepherd

1466 posts in 838 days


#105 posted 11-12-2012 at 07:53 PM

Dude, when you get your new lathe you will have to do a review…. You will be able to turn tree trunks with that one….. When are you getting it?

REO, I do not see where anyone here has looked down on anybody. Slightly out of line headstock and tail stock, results into tapers and out of rounds…..I bet your bearings will wear out quicker as well…. Precision bearing vs a standard bearing is all about tolerance levels, they are made the same just that less play in them. They are made on the same line only that they have been tested, higher QC….. There is more tech mumbo jumbo but pretty much hows it plays out, but you know all that already if you been turning for close to 50 years….. am I right or wrong?

As it goes for just looking for the most expensive lathe and posting a picture, is no,,,,,, Someone is looking to drop 8k into a lathe so for that kind of coin there are other options to look at….. Stainless steel bed plate, Tilt away tailstock, moveable Headstock, Position of the motor, Spindle height adjustment ect et…. As you get higher in machine purchases there are features offered that are not on the less expensive models. Besides, those are my personal choices. Your coming across a tad strong don’t you think? Now if you think for one moment I look down on someone just because they do not agree with me on what I would buy then I did not explain myself well enough. If anybody here took offense please accept my sincere apologies. As it goes for lathe experience I am just a rookie and know very little…...

-- What we do in life will Echo through Eternity........

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Gshepherd

1466 posts in 838 days


#106 posted 11-12-2012 at 07:55 PM

Art, that is one pretty lathe and you did an excellent job on the refurb…....

-- What we do in life will Echo through Eternity........

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Smitty_Cabinetshop

9830 posts in 1255 days


#107 posted 11-12-2012 at 08:31 PM

Art, you can turn porch posts with that, right? Man, that’s incredible. Nice refurb, indeed!

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

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Smitty_Cabinetshop

9830 posts in 1255 days


#108 posted 11-12-2012 at 08:38 PM

Q: What’s variable speed used for, and when is it used? My lathe has the variable pulleys Bandit described. Why change speeds? What is ‘swing’ in a lathe? Why is reversable desirable? What kind of ‘jaws for the chuck’ are common vs. desirable? I’ve got the cross-hatch and a threaded base that I guess is for bowls.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

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ShaneA

5290 posts in 1235 days


#109 posted 11-12-2012 at 08:45 PM

in my preliminary studies smitty…speed varies based on size/balance of turning. Swing is measurement from center to bed. So 2x swing is approx largest diameter of turning. Reverse for sanding….and? Havent a clue on the rest.

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Gshepherd

1466 posts in 838 days


#110 posted 11-12-2012 at 09:00 PM

Reverse is good for sanding and scraping…. I know when doing bowls and such the wood fibers will laydown in one direction and it is hard to get a real smooth finish but reversing directions will usually cure that problem….You will notice on some of the Spindle adapters there is a set screw that is to lock it on the spindle so if you do go into reverse the chuck does not flyoff…..

Speed is nice to adjust for size of turning, sanding, finish work… When starting to rough out a bowl I will start fairly slow around 600-900 rpms depending on the size and as I get it cleaned up will increase the speed. Now with micro sanding papers they suggest going around 200 or less rpm… so you do not burn the mesh….

Now keep in mind my 600rpm to 900rpm is typicial what bowls size I am doing, when you get into larger bowls it will even be slower. Your right on the face plate… I also do Stave turnings and use a compression ring jig and have the faceplate screwed on that cause I use it over and over.

-- What we do in life will Echo through Eternity........

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Smitty_Cabinetshop

9830 posts in 1255 days


#111 posted 11-12-2012 at 09:12 PM

Thanks, I learned more about lathes tonight than I ever knew! Lobe this site…

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

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REO

611 posts in 711 days


#112 posted 11-13-2012 at 05:08 AM

Now this thread has “turned” into something. Questions , answers and information. Gshep you are pretty close I started turning when I was 7 My dad turned for over 60 years. On a wood lathe and I did specify that because most people use hand tools to turn. A slight out of alignment situation will not cause tapers. on a lathe witha bed used for guiding the tool such as a metal lathe it will and in fact the tailstock in some situations is offset for just that purpose. It will not cause out of round either the lathe still runs concentric to the centers. Precision bearings….same thing just to justify a higher cost. I have a 1949 atlas with the same bearings in it for 65 years of its life anyway not precision just plain. This particular lathe has done 5 million pieces of just one item I had to replace seals on it a couple times but the bearings are the same. The run out difference between precision bearings and standard is in the tenths of thousandths range and certainly will not effect the finish of any type of wood. You sand more than that even if you start with 320 sand paper. I may have improperly chosen my words to say “look down on”. It started to look like “my dream is bigger than your dream” and there were some comments made as to why one lathe was better than another. I apologize for my misunderstanding. Horse powers are blown way out of proportion. On variable speed setups they are figured at the highest attainable speed. At less than designed operating speeds the Torque drops off dramatically. I agree that being able to adjust the speed is important. lathes that advertise speeds that start at 0 are pulling your leg. Though they may be able to get low speed under load they will surge and the motors develop heat very quickly. Using variable speed and the pulleys properly above at least half of the rated shaft speed of the motor is best. Reverse is a good feature for reasons described earlier. Swing head lathes are kinda slick especially for operations other than gross material removal but, stability is sacrificed whenever it is out of position. If your going for the big diameters chuck up on the back of the spindle, you will have to come up with a turning support either way. A swing away tail stock? ok I’ll give you that you don’t have to lift it off the lathe and back on when you install your steady rest, but for several hundred dollars? have a friend put something together for it. I know the OP said if money was no object, sorry. Not trying to wet on anyone’s parade. I think that good true information can bring turning to people that think its out of reach because they think they need a “better” lathe to make better turnings. It comes down to the operator.

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REO

611 posts in 711 days


#113 posted 11-13-2012 at 05:22 AM

Art what size motor do you need for the traverse drive on that lathe?

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terryR

3061 posts in 945 days


#114 posted 11-13-2012 at 05:54 AM

Oh yeah…the operator is the single most influencial factor in turning…Good, true info is exactly why we all love this thread. For some experienced folks, it’s boring re-hash of terminology…for others all the terms are new.

REO, we need turner’s with your experience to help answer questions!

But, we also need newbies like me to spark enthusiasm. :) LOL!

The Dream Lathe concept is stolen from the Hand Plane of your Dreams thread…most everyone uses vintage stanleys that have been well tuned for work day in and out, but a photo of a sweet, sometimes unafordable, tool is considered ‘tool porn’...and simply adored for the workmanship that went into the piece. Has nothing to do with my truck is bigger than yours. :)

for example…a fine Holtey jointer that no one could afford…except the guy who commisioned it!

I will NEVER own such a fine plane, but I enjoy looking at photos of ‘em…and I know some of the other weirdos here like it, too, that’s why I would post an unaffordable lathe…just sayin’

-- tr ...see one, do one, teach one...

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Gshepherd

1466 posts in 838 days


#115 posted 11-13-2012 at 06:29 AM

REO, The headstock and tailstock being off, your correct…. I have a Legacy 1800, but also before that I had one of the cnc lathes and I remember doing a taper the tailstock was lowered for the taper….. Out of alignment for being out of round is correct also, I was writing on things and thinking of another, cause at first I would have to rechuck and before I got the tailstock chuck I would just use the old center point and if your off at all you will find out very fast…That your off orginal center. Now since I got the tailstock chuck center it has been great. Hope that made scense….

I know some lathes you can turn from the back side of the headstock but on the Nova DVR you can not, thus just turn the head around but on some lathes you can actually have two people turning if your brave enough. By just watchin my Uncle roughing out bowls and seeing what has happened to him several times I have no desire being that close…... It would be nice just for finishing to be able to use both ends cause on smaller pieces I turn the lathe about 150rpm and use a brush to apply the finish and leave it run. By doing so it seems to level out nicely. I have the ability to finish 2 at a time that way….

If someone is looking to by a lathe, A Good approach is to determine a total budget. Figure in a basic set of lathe tools, a chuck…..grinding jig, what else????? Determine your goals with it. Then just narrow it down from there with the different features….. Other accessories can be bought later like, different jaws, sizes of chucks, ect ect. A budget will determine your options.

-- What we do in life will Echo through Eternity........

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Gshepherd

1466 posts in 838 days


#116 posted 11-13-2012 at 06:58 AM

Terry, your 100% correct…. I know there are guys reading this who know have forgotten more than I will ever know about. What is important what is not and what is just eye candy…. These guys hopefully will step up and with all their years of experience help out the guys who are just starting myself included. There are so many different ways to go anymore when buying anytype of equipment it does get overwelming. What one feature is good for one it may not be important to another.

What are the basic things to look for in a lathe? There has to be a good foundation to start with right? I pick up the phone and call my Uncle or look through a book or look for answers here…..

-- What we do in life will Echo through Eternity........

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ShaneA

5290 posts in 1235 days


#117 posted 11-13-2012 at 01:58 PM

I am trying to narrow in on the budget, while trying to keep in mind that I only want to cry once. If I have to spend a little more to get the value, I probably will be ok with that. I just dont want to get something, out grow it, and then be right back in the market again. However, there is always the chance that I try turning…and think eh, not for me. I would be a lot more comfortable in the $600 machine range than the $1100 machine range. But, I am only trying to buy once, and I am buying a machine and into a craft I know next to nothing about. That is what gives me pause. Heck, maybe I get the HF model and see what all the fuss is about? I always over think tool purchases.

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Planeman40

472 posts in 1398 days


#118 posted 11-13-2012 at 03:07 PM

ShaneA, You can get an excellent wood lathe for $600. It just won’t be new. $600 will buy you a nice older (and better) Delta or Powermatic lathe if you keep looking. There is virtually nothing that can go wrong with them if they haven’t been abused. You can easily get new bearings and motors if needed and the rest is clean up and paint. Just make sure you are getting a 110 or 200 volt SINGLE PHASE electrical input and not three phase industrial power if you have a home shop. And even if you do find a wonderful three phase machine, you can buy a phase converter, though one will cost a couple of hundred bucks or more. I have often thought that if I was starting a shop all over again I would get a three phase converter and take advantage of the lower prices of used 3-phase machines on the market.

Planeman

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

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Gshepherd

1466 posts in 838 days


#119 posted 11-13-2012 at 03:10 PM

Shane, I looked on CL Seward,ne Your griz is on there for 475 bucks and he will throw in some lathe tools to boot….. Check that out…. 475 your set up and once you are into it later down the road you can get what options you really like….

Oh i know no reverse but believe me you can do a lot, even bowls without that option…. 16in swing it is a good starter for sure in my book…. 2hp variable speed, be nice to get down to 200 or so so maybe some others can chime in on the low end speed…..

-- What we do in life will Echo through Eternity........

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ShaneA

5290 posts in 1235 days


#120 posted 11-13-2012 at 03:24 PM

Thanks guys, I have looked over CL a few times. Seward, NE sounds like a haul for me. By the time I figuremy time and gas, I may be up to retail? I get that they are “simple” machines, but I am always a little leary of used stuff. But I will begin to monitor it more closely. If I could score a Delta or PM w/110 power, I may bite on that.

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REO

611 posts in 711 days


#121 posted 11-13-2012 at 03:26 PM

dont let 3 phase scare you off! For 125 dollars you can get a VFD and then you will have the variable speed and the reversing characteristics as well. if you want to you can have three phase for the price of a switch and some wire. You will need an extra 3 phase motor but they can be had for scrap price. that will give you a reversible machine too.

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Salmo

5 posts in 704 days


#122 posted 11-13-2012 at 03:40 PM

My dream lathe would be a one Oneway with a ton of extras. It’s got size/weight/power/accuracy/large swing etc. I need a small lottery win first though :O). Already have some Oneway accessories (Like a Talon chuck, for example and their Termite tool for use in making bowls) for my Rockwell Beaver 11, which is puny by comparison, but I have enjoyed using it and will continue to do so until that dream machine comes to my little shop.

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terryR

3061 posts in 945 days


#123 posted 11-14-2012 at 01:23 PM

Hey, you experienced turners, I’ve a newbie question…

I’m trying to burn the v-grooves already cut into a bowl’s outer surface…read about a guy using wire to do this somewhere online…but no wire I’ve tried yet works. picture hanging wire, copper of various gauges, thin steel, even my wood burner tip doesn’t do the trick.

what’s the trick?

-- tr ...see one, do one, teach one...

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REO

611 posts in 711 days


#124 posted 11-14-2012 at 01:32 PM

almost any wire will work. how much pitch is in the wood determines how long you have to hold the wire to burn. several have used a piece of laminate to do this as well. the diameter of the wire has a lot to do with burn time as well.|Careful the wire gets hot! do not wrap past 1/2 way around or it will grab and surprise you. against what some will tell you wear gloves the first time just make sure the cuffs don’t dangle where they can become fouled in anything.

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terryR

3061 posts in 945 days


#125 posted 11-14-2012 at 01:36 PM

Thanks, REO, I’ll turn up the speed and have another go…just maple…seems like it would burn easily enough!

-- tr ...see one, do one, teach one...

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Arlin Eastman

1990 posts in 1198 days


#126 posted 11-14-2012 at 01:49 PM

Right now I have had my Delta 46-460 for 2 years however, my dream lathe is the VB36 long bed

This one has no bed, however, a bed cost $2500 more and here is a link to the seller here in the US for the Brittish maker

To me this lathe is the best that a person in a wheel chair can work from. You can sit in front of it and do almost anything.

http://www.woodturnerscatalog.com/p/6/1/27/120/-/5523/VB36-Master-Bowlturner-Lathe

Arlin

-- It is always the right time, to do the right thing.

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Gshepherd

1466 posts in 838 days


#127 posted 11-14-2012 at 02:42 PM

Terry, I myself would not be trying to hold onto wire just in case it does slip for reasons I bet you already can see. They make some safe solutions with the wire in different sizes depending on the turning and wooden handles.

-- What we do in life will Echo through Eternity........

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Gshepherd

1466 posts in 838 days


#128 posted 11-14-2012 at 02:56 PM

Arlin, that is a nice lookin lathe there, you could do some massive bowls on that one. I know that Robust makes a lathe where you can be seated and if memory serves me correct so does Oneway. There is a good video on the Robust site of a gentleman who is in a wheel chair using one of them.

-- What we do in life will Echo through Eternity........

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REO

611 posts in 711 days


#129 posted 11-14-2012 at 03:21 PM

Do a search for OREOS40 as a poster on youtube. I have a couple vids on burning rings. one is on the edge of a bowl and the other is on some Epee handles

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terryR

3061 posts in 945 days


#130 posted 11-14-2012 at 03:52 PM

Just got back from the shop…picture hanging wire does indeed burn maple! I was just too impatient before…

...but if there a safer way…heck, I’m here to learn!

-- tr ...see one, do one, teach one...

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rance

4130 posts in 1797 days


#131 posted 11-14-2012 at 05:52 PM

Terry, I’d recommend a non-stranded wire for burning. I’d also recommend non-wound Guitar strings. Stranded wire will work, but it can make deeper cuts since it sometimes CUTs in addition to just burning.

-- Backer boards, stop blocks, build oversized, and never buy a hand plane--

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thedude50

3514 posts in 1115 days


#132 posted 11-14-2012 at 06:22 PM

GSheppard, I have to say the goal is next spring. I would like to do it sooner but I am not going to pull the trigger yet. I have to let the shop turn a profit before another major purchase. I just purchased close to 10k in tools a couple of months back. I know if I dont turn a profit I MAY LOOSE THE SUPPORT OF MY BETTER HALF. I will not risk her for the lathe at this moment IF the fed ex truck or roadrunner show up with another big assed box the wife would be pissed.

-- when I am not on Lumberjocks I am on @ http://thisoldworkshop.com where we allow free speech

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rmoore

313 posts in 1272 days


#133 posted 11-14-2012 at 07:46 PM

Arlin & Gsheperd, Here is a link to a video of my buddy Adam Hood, also an LJ member. He is using a Robust lathe. May be the same video you referred to, Gsheperd. http://vimeo.com/39977398

-- The more I learn, the more I realize I don't know. Ron, Crossville Tn

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Gshepherd

1466 posts in 838 days


#134 posted 11-14-2012 at 09:52 PM

Dude, I totally understand why the wait, who knows by then they would be out for a while and maybe a nice sale…....

Rmoore, that is the video…... They make some damn nice Lathes…...

-- What we do in life will Echo through Eternity........

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carguy460

782 posts in 972 days


#135 posted 11-15-2012 at 05:25 AM

If anyone wants guitar strings like rance mentioned, I’ve got a plethora of used ones…I knew I was saving them for a reason!

-- Jason K

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terryR

3061 posts in 945 days


#136 posted 11-15-2012 at 06:09 AM

Jason, wanna trade some guitar strings for a coffee spoon? or a mallet? PM me…

I bet I can add some custom handles to 10” guitar string…new project idea! :)

-- tr ...see one, do one, teach one...

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waho6o9

4850 posts in 1214 days


#137 posted 11-15-2012 at 06:18 AM

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nC8pG9jdNWs

For smaller turnings, Beall has some new scrapers.
Good folks and good products.

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carguy460

782 posts in 972 days


#138 posted 11-15-2012 at 06:27 AM

No need to trade, Terry! I probably shouldn’t have spoken so soon…there is a small chance that my wife threw out my stash. I’ll check tonight and send you a PM once I’m sure I’ve still got them. I wonder if there would be any use for the wound strings? Might work like an abrasive or something?

-- Jason K

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terryR

3061 posts in 945 days


#139 posted 11-15-2012 at 07:21 AM

Jason, no problema…

My best friend IRL plays guitar all the time…AND wants me to drive over to help move some rough cut cherry today. Perfect.

-- tr ...see one, do one, teach one...

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Arlin Eastman

1990 posts in 1198 days


#140 posted 11-15-2012 at 10:19 AM

GS

I really like the Robust and used one at a friends house. To me it is the same thing as all the rest of the lathes.

If a lathe that stands upright and is tilted at 15 to 20* angle towards the turner would work great or the best I can think of is turning from the end of the lathe.

This way I can face the work and move quite abit more. A person in a wheelchair can not move the body and tool like someone standing who can move their bodies to make a better cut.

I hope I explained it pretty good.

I do not even need anything as big as the VB36 just a lathe where the head can move to the end of the bed.

Arlin

-- It is always the right time, to do the right thing.

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Mauricio

6811 posts in 1788 days


#141 posted 11-15-2012 at 10:26 AM

Not one of my dreams but pretty fascinating, you can make a lathe out anything!

Look how fit that little Indian dude is!

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch

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Gshepherd

1466 posts in 838 days


#142 posted 11-15-2012 at 08:08 PM

It would be interesting to see some home made lathes and some duplicators.

-- What we do in life will Echo through Eternity........

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RVroman

163 posts in 661 days


#143 posted 11-16-2012 at 02:57 AM

My current lathe is the Jet 1642, and I could not be happier. The only thing I am not thrilled about is the indexing system it uses, but I can live with that. My dream would probably be the Powermatic 4224B. Nothing against Oneway, Vicmark, etc. but the sliding headstock is important to me. I probably do 90% of my turning off the end of the lathe. The only time I have used the full length of the 1642 was when I was turning and drilling a 3 foot section of a flyrod tube. However, at 8 grand I do not see the Powermatic in my future, EVER! :-(

Lots of good questions in the thread. But a few caught my eye:

As far as wires for burning go, they do make a commercial product, KC Wire Burners. I have a set, but I have found that the ones I made with guitar strings do just as well, and were a lot cheaper.

Someone mentioned that they sand at 700, yet turn at 300, remember, turn fast, sand slow. Sanding at about 200 – 300 is about as fast as you want to go.

Turning green wood, rough it out leaving the walls about 1” thick. Coat it in anchor seal, wrap it in two brown paper grocery bags, and let it sit for about 6 months. Then turn it again to its final shape. Lately I have been soaking wet rough turnings in DNA for about 48 hours to speed up the drying, and have been getting good results without any cracking. There are a lot of good tutorials on the web about how to do this (the way it is wrapped is key)

ShaneA, where to start? ;-) I was in the same position you are when upgrading my lathe. I had a very basic machine with a 12” swing and about 33” between centers. I was looking at the jet 1642, NOVA DVR, and a few of the Grizzly machines. I spent about 6 – 8 months doing research, looking at the Jet and NOVA in person, etc. A few things turned me away from the Grizzly you mentioned (I am guessing it is the GO462).

The speed only went down to 600 rpm. If you plan to do larger things, want to do any drilling, or a variety of other operations, you will want a slower speed than that. As I recall it does not have indexing. While this may not be important now, it very well could be in the future (it was to me, the pic at the end of this could not have been done without indexing). Also I felt the sliding headstock of the 1642 was of greater benefit than the rotating headstock on the Grizzly or the NOVA.

I finally narrowed it down between the Jet 1642 and the Grizzly GO632. I went with the Jet as it was local, I could see it, Jet’s reputation, and I have a great relationship with my local distributor. (I should probably mention that my lathe is the most used machine in my shop, everything else I use is pretty much for blank preparation, or somehow related to what I am going to turn)

As far as cost, and starting for under $1,000, it depends on how much you get into turning. While you can get started for that, if you really get into it the lathe will be the least of your expenses. Chucks, jaws, gouges, the expense of accessories is controlled by you, but it can get large.

You had mentioned going with a cheaper lathe (I think a Harbor Freight one) just to see if you liked it or not. I am usually one to tell people to run from HF, but I will also admit that I used one of their lathes (34706) very heavily for about 5 years and never had any issues with it. The only reason I upgraded is that I outgrew it, the lathe never failed. In fact it is still in the shop and my 8 year old uses it often. You can usually pick them up new for around $200, but if you are thinking of going that route I would read the reviews of it on the HF site and in various forums, they are pretty good.

Finally, check to see if there is a turning club in your area, that would be a great source of information, getting ideas, perhaps trying a few machines, and learning techniques. You will find that the amount of community and collaboration among turners is amazing. People are [almost] always willing to share information.

That is probably enough for now.

-- Robert --- making toothpicks one 3x3x12 blank at a time!

View terryR's profile

terryR

3061 posts in 945 days


#144 posted 11-16-2012 at 05:36 AM

RV, thanks for sharing your knowledge! I may have been the newbie who mentioned sanding at 700 rpm…only on spindles so far…turning bowls the past couple of days…mostly 5” in diameter…and I slowed down to 400 rpm for that sanding. I love the vari-speed function, so I can turn the lathe to slowest speed for re-marking my pencil lines…then crank it back to 1000 rpm for chisel work.

I also looked at the Grizzly and Jet 1642 very closely before deciding om my little Jet1220. I wanted the larger Jet, but as you mentioned, after considering the additional cost of chucks, jaws, turning tools, etc, I went smaller on the lathe.

And, oh yeah, THAT is an impressive hollow form! How large is it?

-- tr ...see one, do one, teach one...

View ShaneA's profile

ShaneA

5290 posts in 1235 days


#145 posted 11-16-2012 at 05:41 AM

Great info RV, thanks.

View walden's profile

walden

621 posts in 659 days


#146 posted 11-16-2012 at 05:45 AM

My dream lathe is a Barnes peddle lathe. I saw one at Roy Underhill’s school this past summer and have been thinking about it ever since.

-- "When and if the day comes a lion is on my roof, I am hiring a realtor." ShaneA

View carguy460's profile

carguy460

782 posts in 972 days


#147 posted 11-16-2012 at 05:55 AM

Walden – thats my dream lathe too!

-- Jason K

View Mosquito's profile

Mosquito

4650 posts in 929 days


#148 posted 11-16-2012 at 07:16 AM

and this is the one that Mauricio needs…

Barnes treadle threading lathe… saw it on one of the Woodwright’s Shop episodes, and thought Maucicio could use it to make wooden screws… but then again, I’m not sure if you can get the tpi to be low enough…
http://www.lathes.co.uk/barnes/

-- Mos - Twin Cities, MN -- Stanley #45 Evangelist - www.youtube.com/MosquitoMods

View carguy460's profile

carguy460

782 posts in 972 days


#149 posted 11-16-2012 at 07:19 AM

Yeah, I saw that episode Mos! That thing is sweet!

I had the same thought about cutting the wood screws…I bet its a bear to set up correctly!

-- Jason K

View Mauricio's profile

Mauricio

6811 posts in 1788 days


#150 posted 11-16-2012 at 07:48 AM

haha, Yeah I skimmed through that episode. I think I’m going to make Da Vinci’s machine instead.;-)

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch

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