LumberJocks

All Replies on Lathe of your Dreams

  • Advertise with us
View terryR's profile

Lathe of your Dreams

by terryR
posted 11-04-2012 01:50 PM


« prev 1 2 3 4 5 ... 10 next »
453 replies

453 replies so far

View terryR's profile

terryR

3205 posts in 994 days


#51 posted 11-06-2012 07:01 PM

Gshepherd, thanks for the tips on pens. Your girls are lucky to have you for an instructor! Pen-making is definately something I’ll get into before much longer…

Isaach, I sure looked hard at that NOVA DVR…sweet tool…just out of my price range for this year…bummer.

Lance…yeah, I guess I’d pick that Powermatic, too! The amount of features built right in are overwhelming. But, at around $8000, it cost almost as my 4-wheeler! ;)

Richard, the features you need are determined by the products you want to turn. The hard part is predicting everything you wanna make with a lathe BEFORE buying it! :) I mean, if you are looking for a new table saw, you probably already know why…cross cuts, rip cuts, dadoes, maybe tenons? But I think a lathe is more difficult to choose unless you’ve grown up around them…keep reading, bro…someone here will show ya a good choice for YOU…

-- tr ...see one, do one, teach one...

View Sanity's profile

Sanity

169 posts in 1376 days


#52 posted 11-07-2012 06:34 PM

I started wood turning a couple of years ago and have been hooked ever since. The problem is that I very rarely find the time because of my job, home and yard maintenance, etc. My first lathe was the Delta 46-460 with variable speed, which is a great starter lathe. However, I have wanted to do larger pieces, particularly hollow forms vessels, and so decided I needed to get a larger lathe. Recently I was able to purchase a Powermatic 3520b with the bed extension which I guess you could call the lathe of my dreams. First impressions are that the Powermatic is awesome – it is powerful and smooth.

-- Stuart

View terryR's profile

terryR

3205 posts in 994 days


#53 posted 11-07-2012 11:22 PM

Awesome upgrade, Stuart! Thanks for the photo of BOTH lathes…the size difference is very noticeable…Are you looking to sell the 46-460?

Looks like you have a couple of yellow tools in your shop!!! :) sweet!

-- tr ...see one, do one, teach one...

View terryR's profile

terryR

3205 posts in 994 days


#54 posted 11-07-2012 11:31 PM

One of the main reasons I bought a lathe now was to replace broken knobs on vintage hand planes…Here are the successful knobs I made this week. :)

From L to R…Pine cut off…the first piece of wood to hit the lathe after unpacking.
Red Oak turned the first day to fit the first plane in sight…only for practice…this 5 1/2 needs nothing restored.
Walnut to match the new tote on a Stanley #4 recently restored.
Bubinga to match the new tote on a Vaughn & Bushnell being restored…why no frog? Some fool simply forgot to paint it with the rest of the body…and I keep putting it off…

-- tr ...see one, do one, teach one...

View Don W's profile

Don W

15217 posts in 1253 days


#55 posted 11-07-2012 11:37 PM

What’s the finish on that v& b wood terry? It looks kind of flashing

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View thedude50's profile

thedude50

3525 posts in 1163 days


#56 posted 11-07-2012 11:49 PM

True terry but I am old and have no desire to go four wheeling so I am settling in on getting the big Powermatic.

-- when I am not on Lumberjocks I am on @ http://thisoldworkshop.com where we allow free speech

View Gshepherd's profile

Gshepherd

1507 posts in 887 days


#57 posted 11-07-2012 11:51 PM

Terry that vb is looking mighty sweet…... Finish on that is???

-- What we do in life will Echo through Eternity........

View terryR's profile

terryR

3205 posts in 994 days


#58 posted 11-07-2012 11:56 PM

^bubinga is finished with shellac and wax.
walnut is food grade BBO…

-- tr ...see one, do one, teach one...

View terryR's profile

terryR

3205 posts in 994 days


#59 posted 11-08-2012 01:22 PM

Lance, I’m pretty sure you and I are the same age…or very close…old man! :)

Out where we live, a 4-wheeler is almost as necessary as a big lawnmower…great for checking the neighbor’s fence lines on two of our borders, hauling the chainsaw and fuel, pulling logs around, herding cattle, picking up trash along the road way, ‘running’ anywhere to grab a missing tool (we live on 160 acres), or just visiting the neighbors.

I certainly don’t own the 750cc V-Twin for popping wheelies or anything crazy…although I HAVE flipped the 600 pound beast TWICE up on the mountain side…no injuries.

Hey, Al, YOU seem like a 4-wheeler kinda guy??? :)

-- tr ...see one, do one, teach one...

View Sanity's profile

Sanity

169 posts in 1376 days


#60 posted 11-08-2012 02:48 PM

Thanks, Terry. Yes, I very much like PM machines in general, and am particularly happy with my new 3520b lathe. I had looked at the likes of the PM 4224b and Oneway lathes but could not justify the cost, although as the Dude pointed out the new PM is very good value when you consider all the accessories that come with it as standard, i.e. the vacuum chuck and lighting/power kit. I am not looking to sell the Delta at this point in time.

I received my first commission today so am feeling quite chuffed (it is from a relative but still counts I think!). I like to turn things such as these:

-- Stuart

View Sanity's profile

Sanity

169 posts in 1376 days


#61 posted 11-08-2012 02:59 PM

I typically like to turn dry wood. I know some people absolutely love turning green wood but I am not one of them. This was my first attempt at making a hollow form vessel with some green ash. I spent the morning cutting up the log with my chain saw, and then cut out the blank on my band saw. I then started turning and roughed out the shape. I started the hollowing but then had to take a break for lunch for about an hour. By the time I got back to the garage the wood was already showing radial cracks – after all that time and effort, what a pisser!!! I had already given up on the piece by that time but by the next day the wood looked like this:

The learning here is to always keep green wood wet when you are turning.

-- Stuart

View Gshepherd's profile

Gshepherd

1507 posts in 887 days


#62 posted 11-08-2012 03:52 PM

Now that is one fine looking Goblet….

-- What we do in life will Echo through Eternity........

View ShaneA's profile (online now)

ShaneA

5347 posts in 1284 days


#63 posted 11-08-2012 10:10 PM

The stand for your turning is pretty sweet too. Would you use a spray bottle to keep it wet? or what would be the method of choice? How long before you are out of the woods with green wood and its movement?

View OnlyJustME's profile

OnlyJustME

1562 posts in 1062 days


#64 posted 11-09-2012 01:07 AM

hope my skills are as good as yours some day Stuart. What kind of wood is that goblet?

-- In the end, when your life flashes before your eyes, will you like what you see?

View thedude50's profile

thedude50

3525 posts in 1163 days


#65 posted 11-09-2012 03:46 AM

Green wood turning is tricky stuff. I have to say i love the shavings of the green turning wood but I dont like having to treat it like a prom date.

Terry, I am 51 I dont heal well after the fall I WONT GET CLOSE TO A DIRT BIKE OR A QUAD. I just cant take another injury. Plus being diabetic I dont heal fast. So Ya i am old for 51 I live in town now and i like the size of my lot manageable for me. This way I can focus on my good hobby’s. I love my shop and hope to have it completed before June.

-- when I am not on Lumberjocks I am on @ http://thisoldworkshop.com where we allow free speech

View RogerC's profile

RogerC

51 posts in 1034 days


#66 posted 11-09-2012 04:06 AM

How can it be a lathe of your dreams forum if no one has said they want a Oneway. Made right here in Canada. I mean that PM thedude50 posted is ok but really its just a wanna be/ total poser compared to this beast ;) http://www.oneway.ca/index.php?option=com_virtuemart&page=shop.browse&category_id=18&Itemid=2

View ShaneA's profile (online now)

ShaneA

5347 posts in 1284 days


#67 posted 11-09-2012 04:09 AM

My dreams don’t reach that far Roger. That is quite beast like, I would have to sell a kidney…hmm, something to think about!

View thedude50's profile

thedude50

3525 posts in 1163 days


#68 posted 11-09-2012 04:43 AM

Roger, I prefer the ergonomics and the features of the Powermatic. The one way is no larger than the powermatic and the powermatic is a system you have to add on too many features to the oneway to be close to the Powermatic. . A Poser you have got to be kidding.

-- when I am not on Lumberjocks I am on @ http://thisoldworkshop.com where we allow free speech

View Sanity's profile

Sanity

169 posts in 1376 days


#69 posted 11-09-2012 01:39 PM

Firstly, thanks for the nice comments guys. The goblet was made from maple burl with a brown ebony stem. Secondly , Roger I am a big fan of the Oneway lathes but as a hobbyist and wishing to stay married, I could not justify that sort of expense. Let’s face it, the prices on the website are a guide because like any German car there are options like stainless steel ways (wouldn’t it be great to not have to worry about rust?) which can push up the cost substantially. I like to keep my dreams in the realm of reality….... However, I do have a collection of Oneway products, including the Wolverine jig and accessories, and stronghold chuck for my lathe.

Regarding green wood turning, cracking is of course caused by uneven loss of moisture, i.e. the outside first. I don’t have much experience here, but I’m sure you could use a spray bottle to keep the blank wet. I have also been told that if you are leaving the piece on the lathe for any length of time to cover it in a wet towel and or something like Glad wrap. You are not out of the woods until the moisture content is down to about 15%.

There are books about this subject of course, and why green wood is typically rough turned and then carefully stored for months on end, e.g. bowl turners will rough turn a blank so that the ratio of the wall thickness to diameter is approx 10% and then wrap it in brown paper and store it. They will eventually re-chuck the piece and finish turning it. Other turners will simply dry their pieces on the lathe. I think it all comes down to experience.

-- Stuart

View terryR's profile

terryR

3205 posts in 994 days


#70 posted 11-09-2012 01:43 PM

Lance, bud, there are many days when I’d like to trade in the 160 acres for just 10…just so I get more shop time! :) And I’m post-op x 2 myself. Nursing ruined my lower back, ya know?

Stuart, that goblet is to die for! Congrats on the commision…

Roger…OK…The Oneway 2436 with 3hp is the new lathe of MY dreams! :) The spindles, bearings, everything sound overbuilt the way I’d expect a $6500 tool to be!

At first, I was put off by the tubular bed style…but now I see their reason for it. And I sure thought they were more expensive than powermatics! Guess I was wrong about that…

But, there’s no way I’d consider a powermatic costing $6000 to be a poser. Their tools are legendary.

just sayin’

-- tr ...see one, do one, teach one...

View terryR's profile

terryR

3205 posts in 994 days


#71 posted 11-09-2012 01:50 PM

Shane, here’s another book recommendation for your wallet to enjoy… :)

Turning Green Wood by Michael O’Donnell.

No experience with such here…yet…but I’ve hand carved many bowls, so intend to turn many as well. The idea of turning green stuff now…letting it dry for 6-12 months…then finishing the piece sounds like long term fun! :)

can you guys tell I’m hooked after a week!!!

-- tr ...see one, do one, teach one...

View Don W's profile

Don W

15217 posts in 1253 days


#72 posted 11-09-2012 01:54 PM

I could tell after that first knob!!

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View ShaneA's profile (online now)

ShaneA

5347 posts in 1284 days


#73 posted 11-09-2012 02:17 PM

In looking at non budget busting lathes, what type of emphasis should one put on horse power? I see that the ones I am mostly noticing in my beginning research are 3/4 to 2hp (110 power). Is horsepower a real important feature? Also, what should be the lowest capability speed I should be looking for? So many questions…thanks

View terryR's profile

terryR

3205 posts in 994 days


#74 posted 11-09-2012 02:31 PM

Shane, as far as low speeds…I’ve been handing sanding at about 700 rpm and that feels pretty comfy to me..although I turn about 300 rpm when using a pencil for layout. Only got 3/4 hp myself…couldn’t afford more. I assume more hp is for larger diameter pieces?

Hey, Don, I turned a knob up-side down this week! oops! :)

-- tr ...see one, do one, teach one...

View Don W's profile

Don W

15217 posts in 1253 days


#75 posted 11-09-2012 02:33 PM

I’ve never done that. Nope. Never. :-)

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View Planeman40's profile

Planeman40

484 posts in 1446 days


#76 posted 11-09-2012 02:33 PM

All of this talk about lathes prompted me to join in.

I have an old Delta 12” lathe from around the 1940s that is all cast iron and solid as a brick. Wonderful machine. The truth is a wood lathe, unlike a lot of machines, is a very simple machine with no close tolerances except for good bearings in the headstock. It does need to be heavy to deal with out-of-round work at the beginning of turning.

That said, one of the most interesting wood lathes I have ever seen was a large one in the Georgia Tech aeronautical engineering shop back in the early 1960s when I was there. You would think they would have a cast iron monster, but what was there was a large shop-made all-wood lathe. The bed was made from two large nicely planed beams of hard maple about 12” x 6” each and about 12 ft. long, The headstock was simply a huge DC electric motor with a large speed control mounted to the maple beams that had a shop-made spindle mounted to the motor shaft. The tailstock was all maple except for a shop-made steel center and the tool rest was all maple. The base was a nice boxy affair weighted down with sand inside. Any one of us could have made that thing. I asked about it and was told it was made in the WW-2 days when steel and iron was war priority and was still used frequently and worked beautifully.

Just a thought about what often does an excellent job doesn’t have to be expensive or “store-bought”.

Planeman

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

View Sanity's profile

Sanity

169 posts in 1376 days


#77 posted 11-09-2012 03:14 PM

Planeman I agree with what you say apart from the part about close tolerances. If your drive center and tail stock center aren’t accurately aligned you are in trouble.

-- Stuart

View Gshepherd's profile

Gshepherd

1507 posts in 887 days


#78 posted 11-09-2012 08:05 PM

Terry, your right on track looking at the OneWay….... 6500 clams you still have 2,ooo left over to outfit it the way you like and on certain tools I look at resale as well….. How many Oneway Lathes do you see beings sold as used vs Powermatic….. I am not knocking the Powermatic but give me 8k and I will get the Oneway and never look back unless I am walking away from it…. But for now I have to settle with my Nova DVR…...

-- What we do in life will Echo through Eternity........

View RogerC's profile

RogerC

51 posts in 1034 days


#79 posted 11-09-2012 08:33 PM

No I’m afriad I have to call you on this one dude50 unless the powermatic is made on this side of the puddle? in that case I have some simpathy to the guy who bought it at 7500 at woodcraft. But I’m pretty sure its not, so compared to the Oneway which is just incredibly well manufactured I dont have a stitch of hesitation in choosing it every single time. Just the lathe itself with a monster headstock/tailstock, incredible bearings, servicability, etc. is impressive. Then come the accessories, the chucks, live centers, faceplates etc. just absolute tanks. I get a kick out of that live center everytime, its just so solid! http://oneway.ca/spindle/live_center.htm I mean double bearings and the cone holding options? great stuff. And Gshepherd is absolutley right. I have only ever seen one, Onway come up for sale and it was for the same price he actually bought it for a few years back. Can’t beat that!

View RogerC's profile

RogerC

51 posts in 1034 days


#80 posted 11-09-2012 08:35 PM

forgot to mention the optional Stainless bed, also awesome

View Gshepherd's profile

Gshepherd

1507 posts in 887 days


#81 posted 11-09-2012 10:20 PM

When you guys think about it…. Compare a Oneway to a Powermatic is pure insanity. The Oneway has that ora of quality glowing around it. Overkill on construction. Then you look at the price between the 2 and IMOP hands down the Oneway is the holy grail of lathes….. I am sure the Powermatic is nice also and I know a lot of guys love them and that is great. How many Oneway owners would trade for a Powermatic and vise versa??

Before I bought my first lathe which was the Nova DVR, I looked at a nice Powermatic but for the money differance and not even knowing if I would be hooked with the bug I chose the Nova…. The Nova is a darn good Lathe but it is no Oneway….. Now do I wish when I had the bucks to buy the Oneway, Hell Yes….. My goal now is to Pimp myself out to get enough cash to buy myself a Oneway…. So hopefully in 20 or so years I can have my dream come true….

-- What we do in life will Echo through Eternity........

View terryR's profile

terryR

3205 posts in 994 days


#82 posted 11-10-2012 02:02 PM

...still new to my lathe…I guess THIS is what the reversing switch does? :)

(Just kidding…my $700 jet doesn’t have such a switch)

-- tr ...see one, do one, teach one...

View ShaneA's profile (online now)

ShaneA

5347 posts in 1284 days


#83 posted 11-10-2012 03:25 PM

The good news Terry is…the shape and proportions are really nice.

View Gshepherd's profile

Gshepherd

1507 posts in 887 days


#84 posted 11-10-2012 03:46 PM

So far I have to say it is the best upside down knob I have ever seen….. Wow did I just leave the door open there??

-- What we do in life will Echo through Eternity........

View thedude50's profile

thedude50

3525 posts in 1163 days


#85 posted 11-11-2012 01:27 AM

I dont think country of origin is a mater to me like it used to be. I have never thought of Canadian goods as High quality like old American goods. But when Walter Meier built the plant in Taiwan and trained all the workers to build things to their standards it is less an issue as one would think.

That said this is still kind of a free country for at least the time being. And while it is I will choose to purchase the Powermatic as soon as money allows. I am not going to get into a pissing match of whose is better. I have looked at all the machines and feel the Powermatic meets my needs better. If you choose to buy the One Way that is fine by me but the Powermatic is a sound machine it is considered to be the favorite of buyers as well as it has a back order status and has since the day it was released dealers should be able to see the lathe in their stores soon but they seem to sell as soon as they arrive.

In my opinion the one way has poor ergonomics, it is quite ugly and is from a tiny manufacture. I want something that will have support for 30 years. I dont want to buy from a small company only to have to have replacement parts fabricated when it breaks.

-- when I am not on Lumberjocks I am on @ http://thisoldworkshop.com where we allow free speech

View Gshepherd's profile

Gshepherd

1507 posts in 887 days


#86 posted 11-11-2012 02:11 AM

Dude, I agree with a lot of your saying and respect that. Everyone has their own taste and critera on how they determine what is best for them.

I however totally disagree with one comment…....

I dont think country of origin is a mater to me like it used to be

I do care where my purchases are being made. I will purchase American Made products whenever possible. I know it can not be done everytime…. I take a lot of pride in my shop knowing I have the majority of my equipment and handtools american made. Knowing that my purchase in some way has help keep food on the table for someone. If everyone had felt as strongly as I do on this subject there would be less unemployment.

Table Saw, Jointer, Planer, 2 Drill Presses, 37” Sander, Scroll Saw, Edge Sander, Rosette Cutter Machine, Panel Master, Spraying Equipment, W H Moulder, Disk Sander, Dust Collector, numerous handtools, drill bits, Starret, W.L. Fuller, Snappy, Montana Brand, USA Clamps just to name a few….. It does make a difference…....

As it should to You and everyone who reads this. I’ll get off the box now…..

-- What we do in life will Echo through Eternity........

View thedude50's profile

thedude50

3525 posts in 1163 days


#87 posted 11-11-2012 03:28 AM

Well like I said it does not matter to me as much as it once did. With every American company making tools in the free Asian market. We have taxed and inflated our goods right out of the market in the name of corporate profits. But if the quality is as good or better than things made currently in the USA. I will buy the Import and frankly I dont feel guilty about it anymore. I just got several new tools and I didn’t even look at where they were made as part of the decision to buy. If there were comparable American made goods I would have bought them but in most cases there were either none or none available with the features I wanted. New PCS from Saw Stop not made in the USA. no safe saw is made here . only us made choice Delta Unisaw Not available with safety devise. and still hard to come by. Hand Planes I just spent 2k on hand planes that are new All were American made All Lie Nielsen. I prefer these planes to any currently made but not including boutique Planes. I choose to buy these because I THINK THEY ARE THE BEST TOOL However some people think they can get as good of results with antique planes and while I do get great results with my vintage planes there is level of performance I get from new planes . I will be buying a couple of more tools but I am close to full. I plan or the lathe purchase and I need a big planer and a molding machine. A few more Hand Planes and a toy from time to time but my shop if full so every purchase is a choice of what I keep and what I give up.

-- when I am not on Lumberjocks I am on @ http://thisoldworkshop.com where we allow free speech

View thedude50's profile

thedude50

3525 posts in 1163 days


#88 posted 11-11-2012 03:28 AM

Well like I said it does not matter to me as much as it once did. With every American company making tools in the free Asian market. We have taxed and inflated our goods right out of the market in the name of corporate profits. But if the quality is as good or better than things made currently in the USA. I will buy the Import and frankly I dont feel guilty about it anymore. I just got several new tools and I didn’t even look at where they were made as part of the decision to buy. If there were comparable American made goods I would have bought them but in most cases there were either none or none available with the features I wanted. New PCS from Saw Stop not made in the USA. no safe saw is made here . only us made choice Delta Unisaw Not available with safety devise. and still hard to come by. Hand Planes I just spent 2k on hand planes that are new All were American made All Lie Nielsen. I prefer these planes to any currently made but not including boutique Planes. I choose to buy these because I THINK THEY ARE THE BEST TOOL However some people think they can get as good of results with antique planes and while I do get great results with my vintage planes there is level of performance I get from new planes . I will be buying a couple of more tools but I am close to full. I plan or the lathe purchase and I need a big planer and a molding machine. A few more Hand Planes and a toy from time to time but my shop if full so every purchase is a choice of what I keep and what I give up.

-- when I am not on Lumberjocks I am on @ http://thisoldworkshop.com where we allow free speech

View Gshepherd's profile

Gshepherd

1507 posts in 887 days


#89 posted 11-11-2012 10:10 AM

I agree with a lot of what you are saying….. I am just saying we should pay more attention and support the companys with good products. When I make a purchase I do pay attention to where it is made and if there is a company who makes an item here and it is good I will buy it….. There are a lot of items not made here that are top notch as well this I know…..

So what kind of moulding machine are you looking at? Planer?

Check out Robust lathes….. also Serious Tool works…. I have to admitt the Robust looks pretty sweet…..

-- What we do in life will Echo through Eternity........

View thedude50's profile

thedude50

3525 posts in 1163 days


#90 posted 11-11-2012 03:25 PM

I have not decided if i will go with a shaper or a molding cutter instead there are tons of choices and the molding cutting machine will likely come after the lathe. Did you have a idea on a molding machine or a shaper? I have just started my research on these tools. It takes me a while to make up my mind although I am partial towards WM tools jet or Powermatic.

It was a hard choice when i decided on a table saw I WANTED A SAFE SAW but I also wanted a Powermatic. I ended up going with the Saw Stop because it is built well and it is a safe saw. But for me to pull the trigger it had to be a great saw performance fit and finish wise.

-- when I am not on Lumberjocks I am on @ http://thisoldworkshop.com where we allow free speech

View terryR's profile

terryR

3205 posts in 994 days


#91 posted 11-12-2012 02:26 PM

oooh…I like the overbuilt look of that Robust…automatically means I can’t afford it! Heck, I don’t even have to look up the price on a power tool that looks THAT nice…outta my league. :)

Anybody here turn bottle stoppers or small stuff on a screw-based mount? I think Nova calls their’s a wormwood screw…

I tried it once this weekend and it sucked the big one! I was turning a little knob for a plane…drilled the 3/8” pilot hole as described…threaded the blank on the screw by hand…but it was loose and wobbly as he!! under chisel pressure! Oh yeah, I also had a 1/4” through hole bored in the blank…and the screw was held by nova jaws…

Was my through hole the problem? What do you guys use to hold the screw? jaws? or drill chuck? I’d love to know more…

-- tr ...see one, do one, teach one...

View Gshepherd's profile

Gshepherd

1507 posts in 887 days


#92 posted 11-12-2012 06:29 PM

I just noticed this weekend while skipping through the WC site looking at some lathe tools and found that they are now offering the Robust lathe. They are pricey…... But before I would drop 8-9k on a Powermatic, I would defiently go with the Robust or Oneway…... Did you see how the tail stock tilts away….. I got tears in my eyes looking at that….. Buying a Robust or Oneway is like buying your last Lathe…...

-- What we do in life will Echo through Eternity........

View Gshepherd's profile

Gshepherd

1507 posts in 887 days


#93 posted 11-12-2012 06:40 PM

Oh Terry, I have used the screw mount and find I have the same problem with it as well,,,, Now if I thew on a log to turn down some I think it would be a good choice, roughing a log down some…. I usually just use a spur until I get a dovetail or make it ready for the chuck works best for me but I by far no expert maybe in 10 years or so I will be,LOL…...

-- What we do in life will Echo through Eternity........

View rum's profile

rum

148 posts in 1271 days


#94 posted 11-12-2012 07:32 PM

A Holtzapffel (or clone) ornamental would be pretty interesting. Hadn’t heard of the Ray Lawler clone, thanks for that. I also really like the idea of the treadle lathes, although a slightly heavier flywheel seems like it might work moderately better (.

There is an Axelson right now on gsaauctions.gov (auction # A1QSCI13015748 – can’t figure out how to link to the actual auction) that I think qualifies. “LATHE, MFG AXELSON MFG CO, SIZE 24”, 20 FT BED, 29” SWING, 170” CENTER WITH FLAME SPRAYER-(SPRAYER DISASSEMBLED & READY TO LOAD), SN: 0087591, 1 EA. Broom not included.”
I have no idea what I’d do with it much less where to put it (or how to load/unload it). Hehe. Current bid with one day left is only $509, although I bet it goes a lot higher and the cost to move would be .. interesting.

I’d second a Robust and One Way as dream lathes for normal people :D

A large pattern makers lathe like a Oliver 20/22 or Faye & Scott or similar would be pretty nifty as well.

View Tennessee's profile

Tennessee

1466 posts in 1200 days


#95 posted 11-12-2012 08:10 PM

In 2002 my wonderful wife asked me what my dream lathe would be, if I could choose. I went back and forth between the Oneway and the Powermatic, and finally settled on a Powermatic 3220, no extension table, but with the extra tool rest holder and the long tool rest, an outboard tool rest, (heavy bugger), some extra bowl tools and lots of different jaws for the chuck. Back then, the only complaints I had were the 3220 had a frequency readout on the back, no RPM readout, (but who really uses that), and the chuck thread size was a little strange in 2002, 1 1/4X8TPI, I believe.
Since then, I’ve made lots of stuff on that thing, moved it three times across country, and it still runs perfectly, smoothly, and at low speeds, you had better look because you cannot hear it running until you put a tool to it. Absolutely no complaints at all. Last project was a gavel for a new Toastmasters club a friend asked for in Maryland. I’ve often thought I somehow should build a guitar on it, some sort of strange rotational instrument.

-- Paul, Tennessee, http://www.tsunamiguitars.com

View Gshepherd's profile

Gshepherd

1507 posts in 887 days


#96 posted 11-12-2012 08:56 PM

Paul, sounds like you got a lot of use out of your Powermatic, heck 10 years already…. time flys…. I never had a lathe and and liked the features on the Nova DVR. It is a good lathe, excellent CS….. I also bought the ornamental turner attachment they offered back then along with some of the other accessories like a tool rest for metal turning and thread bits ect et…. But I would love to have a Oneway or Robust. Oneway before just because of the cost. You could easily have 10k into the Robust. That is a lot of coin for us weekend warriors…..

It is nice to dream about them though. Most important is no matter what lathe you have as long as you use it and enjoy it. It’s all about making shavings and smiles…... Your B-saw boxes are very nice by the way…..

-- What we do in life will Echo through Eternity........

View terryR's profile

terryR

3205 posts in 994 days


#97 posted 11-13-2012 12:00 AM

I agree with ya there, shep, it’s fun to dream about a lathe costing 10 grand…but it’s only a dream for most of us! :)

Making shavings is what it’s all about. For me, watching the finished form begin to take shape, then slowly mimick my drawing is like a drug! The lathe may be a power tool, but it certainly makes me feel connected to the wood…constantly, ya know?

My hands are tired from filling a 5 gallon bucket with chips today…maple…walnut…bubinga…only got 3/4hp. :)

-- tr ...see one, do one, teach one...

View REO's profile

REO

626 posts in 759 days


#98 posted 11-13-2012 12:12 AM

The Oneway, The Powermatic, The Robust, and then to look down on someone who doesn’t want the one you want. I guess I misinterpreted dream. I took it as a goal not as a fantasy. I would like to hear back from some of the posters. Its like dreaming to fly a fighter jet without understanding what makes a plane fly. Did you just look up a big expensive lathe and post a picture.What would you do on some of the lathes you have mentioned. Include your present level of experience. Can someone tell me what problem is caused on a wood lathe with a slightly out of line tailstock and headstock. (slightly not extremely) Or why precision bearings instead of standard bearings makes a difference. Why is the powermatic cast and others are welded steel. Bragging rights don’t make turnings any better just more expensive.

View OnlyJustME's profile

OnlyJustME

1562 posts in 1062 days


#99 posted 11-13-2012 12:25 AM

My current lathe only has 1/3hp but it works good enough. Had a little trouble with some really old and cured black locust Would be nice to be able to leave the chips on my concrete floor as a cushion but drop anything and it disappears.

-- In the end, when your life flashes before your eyes, will you like what you see?

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

7125 posts in 1369 days


#100 posted 11-13-2012 01:03 AM

I’ll just stick with my old T-bed Craftsman, had almost 30 years now. All I ever need it for is maybe a few table legs, and maybe some knobs and other handles. Just a basic set of chisels too, nothing real fancy. Cost to buy this lathe when new? About $90, with the chisels being extra. had to wait until I sold a couple Chest-on-Chests before I could get a set from Sears. Then went out and bought second set a few years later, just for some smaller profiles. I do have ONE bowl gouge, never used.

Just a little 12” swing, by 37” long lathe. Small grooved belt that I move back and forth to change to one of the five speeds this has. Might take…..maybe…1 minute to change speeds.

Been looking around for other “centers” that might fit, maybe a live center in the tail stock? Used an old “Floor Flange” as a face plate. Just chuck it on to the headstock, and gave the casting a spin. Used a couple files to true up the casting (Gray Iron) just to get a wobble out of it. Either a 3/4’ pipe flange, or maybe a 1” pipe flange size, been awhile since I’ve used it. Tried one bowl turning, wasn’t my “cup of tea”, moved on to other items.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

« prev 1 2 3 4 5 ... 10 next »
453 replies


DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase