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I'm going to have a lot of wood for sale (Central California)

by Mark Smith
posted 10-29-2012 10:56 AM


39 replies so far

View Dollyb's profile

Dollyb

2 posts in 696 days


#1 posted 10-29-2012 12:42 PM

Hey Mark,
I saw that auction and was tempted.
Congrats.
I might be interested in some of the wood.
How do you price out your cnc work? And, what dimensions can it do?
Thanks,
Dolly Spragins

-- Dolly Spragins, CA, http://www.dollyspragins.com

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Mark Smith

497 posts in 693 days


#2 posted 10-29-2012 03:04 PM

Dolly right now I’m still learning on the CNC machine so for prices I’ll tell you I’ll work for really cheap. Tell me what you want and I’ll tell you how much. Once I’ve done a few jobs and figure out how long teh work takes and what the market will support then I can set some type of a fixed price.

The work bed on the machine is 18” by 58”. It will do round work up to 9” in diameter and 58” long. There are techniques that can be used to make bigger items. For example if you wanted a sign bigger than 18” by 58” the software will cut it into tiles and you make one piece at a time and then attach all the pieces together.

The wood should start arriving today so I’ll put some photos up and figure out exactly what I have.

-- Mark Smith, Tracy, CA., http://www.markscustomwoodcrafts.com

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Mark Smith

497 posts in 693 days


#3 posted 10-29-2012 10:17 PM

I was over looking at the wood today and I was told that the wood that I thought was Black Cherry is actually Jatoba otherwise known as Brazallian Cherry. Also a large stack (Probably 1000 board feet) that I thought was Yellow Pine, is actually Ash. The Yellow pine is only a couple of levels thick and the rest under it was all Ash.

-- Mark Smith, Tracy, CA., http://www.markscustomwoodcrafts.com

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Mark Smith

497 posts in 693 days


#4 posted 10-29-2012 10:19 PM

This is the wood, at least the front stacks that you can see. There are equal size stacks behind these two. All of the darker wood in the front stack on the left is Walnut. There is also more Walnut in the back.

-- Mark Smith, Tracy, CA., http://www.markscustomwoodcrafts.com

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Mark Smith

497 posts in 693 days


#5 posted 10-29-2012 10:22 PM

This is the wood that I’m told is Jatoba. I’ll still have to confirm that as this info came from another woodworker that was there picking up the wood he bought. I’m not familiar with Jatoba at all.

-- Mark Smith, Tracy, CA., http://www.markscustomwoodcrafts.com

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Mark Smith

497 posts in 693 days


#6 posted 10-29-2012 10:27 PM

Here is another stack that is labeled as “BC” under species just like the above, but on this one you can see they actually wrote “Jatoba” right on the label. So I guess it is Jatoba.

-- Mark Smith, Tracy, CA., http://www.markscustomwoodcrafts.com

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Mark Smith

497 posts in 693 days


#7 posted 10-29-2012 10:40 PM

The bottom two layers on this pile are White Oak. The next two thick layers (Labeled with green paint as HY) are the Hickory. The next layer that is falling apart is White Pine. The darker wood on top is Walnut.

All of the wood is currently labeled with tags just like in the above photo. I’ve taken pictures of all the tags as the wood is being moved to my shop on a open bed truck so I don’t know if the tags will survive the journey.

Most of the wood is 4/4 FAS. According to my guide on wood from the American Hardwood Export Council, “The FAS grade, which derives from an original grade “First And Seconds”, will provide the user with long, clear cuttings – best suited for high quality furniture, interior joinery and solid wood mouldings.” So this wood is all the highest grade wood. In fact it was all destined to be cut up and turned into moulding before the company went out of business.

-- Mark Smith, Tracy, CA., http://www.markscustomwoodcrafts.com

View NormG's profile

NormG

4175 posts in 1656 days


#8 posted 10-29-2012 10:41 PM

And, I am on the other coast

-- Norman

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Mark Smith

497 posts in 693 days


#9 posted 10-29-2012 10:52 PM

But Norman you guys on the other coast have all the good wood prices anyway! I think 90% of the hardwood we can even get in California is coming from the east coast and we have to pay a premium for that shipping.

-- Mark Smith, Tracy, CA., http://www.markscustomwoodcrafts.com

View AandCstyle's profile

AandCstyle

1316 posts in 910 days


#10 posted 10-29-2012 11:16 PM

I wish that I was about a thousand miles closer to you. I’m in NM where we hardly have any wood…... :(

-- Art

View robert triplett's profile

robert triplett

1481 posts in 1757 days


#11 posted 10-29-2012 11:41 PM

I will be following this post as you get it home and sort through it. I often drive down to Sacramento for wood. Hopefully you don’t need all of the Walnut! I like BC for cutting boards. It sure is hard. There are other web sites to try. Woodnet forums, woodbarter are a few.

-- Robert, so much inspiration here, and so little time!

View Mark Smith's profile

Mark Smith

497 posts in 693 days


#12 posted 10-29-2012 11:55 PM

Robert, part of me wants to keep all of this! But it’s way more wood that I can use in a decade and I used to keep my motorhome in my shop but I had to move it out to make room for the wood. So my plan is once I get it I’m going to select out what I want to keep and put it on my lumber racks in the back of the shop. Everything else I’ll get rid of. I’d like to get the motohome back indoors.

I can’t imagine I’ll keep all of that walnut. I had just bought $700 worth of walnut from my regular supplier and I still have all of it on the rack. I don’t know if I should admit exactly what I paid for all this wood, but lets just say it was only a fraction of what you could buy it for at a lumber yard. I would imagine it was only a fraction of what a lumber yard could even buy it for. I’m not looking to get rich trying to sell the stuff and I’m still figuring out some prices, but it will be cheaper than wholesale prices at the local places around here. Heck I could sell it at 50% of the wholesale price and still make some money on the deal.

-- Mark Smith, Tracy, CA., http://www.markscustomwoodcrafts.com

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Mark Smith

497 posts in 693 days


#13 posted 10-30-2012 12:06 AM

I should also add that I am a licensed business so I have to charge California sales tax on all sales out of here.

-- Mark Smith, Tracy, CA., http://www.markscustomwoodcrafts.com

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Mark Smith

497 posts in 693 days


#14 posted 10-30-2012 06:34 PM

The wood is arriving at my shop. This is the stack of walnut, and I still have more walnut coming. Now that I have it at the shop and can get an idea of how much it is, I will be selling a lot of it. It’s way more than I could ever use.

-- Mark Smith, Tracy, CA., http://www.markscustomwoodcrafts.com

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Mark Smith

497 posts in 693 days


#15 posted 10-30-2012 06:42 PM

This stack is mostly Ash with the middle section being Yellow Pine. That bottom stack of Ash os over 1000 board feet, FAS 4/4 rough sawn. It’s all 16’ long with widths between 8” and 12”.

-- Mark Smith, Tracy, CA., http://www.markscustomwoodcrafts.com

View OnlyJustME's profile

OnlyJustME

1562 posts in 1029 days


#16 posted 10-30-2012 06:51 PM

i’m convinced all the good auctions are out on the west coast.

-- In the end, when your life flashes before your eyes, will you like what you see?

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Mark Smith

497 posts in 693 days


#17 posted 10-30-2012 07:54 PM

This was a good auction and I actually think I practically stole this stuff. Most all of the wood at the auction (two huge warehouses full) was red oak and poplar. There was some white oak, pine and ash. There was one lot of white oak that was about the same size as the lot I have, and I know it sold for close to $12,000. The lot I got was in the back corner of the warehouse and was labeled only as Walnut and Misc Lumber. I think most of the people bidding did not go look at the wood. Luckily the wood was close to home so I got to see it and I saw all the walnut, cherry, hickory, and white oak. I think if it would have been more clearly listed on the auction site as to what was in the stack, this would have sold for a lot more. But the auction company was in hurry as they have to be out of the building by the 31st of this month.

But on a sad note, this company was another victim of the economy and believe it or not, they were the victim of a government bailout. This was a family owned moulding company that the great grand father opened back in the 30’s and it had stayed in the family ever since. They were even still using some of the original power machines from back in the 30’s and 40’s and those were also sold at the auction. I was told that the guy who bought them is going to scrap them. On the bailout end, apparently they had a huge line of credit and because of the downturn in construction they were having problems with the bank. I’m told the bank foreclosed because they were going to get bailed out on 80% of the loan by some government program and they get everything from the auction up to their loan balance. So their choice was work with the company and try and keep them in business, or take the government bailout and get 100% of their money back. They took the bailout. Didn’t mean to turn this into politics, but that’s what happened to the company according to one source I had.

-- Mark Smith, Tracy, CA., http://www.markscustomwoodcrafts.com

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OnlyJustME

1562 posts in 1029 days


#18 posted 10-30-2012 09:32 PM

Such a shame. Hate to see any family business go under.

-- In the end, when your life flashes before your eyes, will you like what you see?

View mmh's profile

mmh

3421 posts in 2375 days


#19 posted 10-30-2012 09:40 PM

“B.C.” is short for Brazilian Cherry aka Jatoba http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hymenaea_courbaril . It is not related to cherry as we know it here in the USA. It’s a very dense wood that I like to use for cane shafts as it can support a lot of weight and also used for furniture. The grain is not too coarse, so it’s easy to work with with the right sharp tools.

-- "They who dream by day are cognizant of many things which escape those who dream only by night." ~ Edgar Allan Poe

View Mark Smith's profile

Mark Smith

497 posts in 693 days


#20 posted 10-30-2012 10:29 PM

Here’s a question for your master woodworkers out there, after I sorted through my first stack of Walnut I ended up with all these “scrap” pieces. I put the chair in the photo to show scale as to how big the pile is. I call them scrap, but they are useable walnut, I just don’t know who they would all be useable to. You could cut them up and make pen blanks, but I don’t know what I would do with a million walnut pen blanks. Most of the pieces are under 2” wide and probably under 1” on many of them. I assume the moulding company saved them because they could be cut into quarter round moulding or something along those lines. My problem is I don’t think the people that I’m going to market this wood to will have a need for these and I don’t want them taking up space in my shop for three years. Anybody got any ideas on what type of industry may want these? I’d like to sell them for a little money at least.

-- Mark Smith, Tracy, CA., http://www.markscustomwoodcrafts.com

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Mark Smith

497 posts in 693 days


#21 posted 10-30-2012 10:50 PM

And another question, I’m still working on pricing for this lumber. I want to offer it for a really good price, but at the same time I do have to pay the rent and utilitiy bills too. In normal retail and wholesale prices on lumber, how much difference does rough sawn on all four sides made versus planed on two sides and one straight edge. For example, a while back I bought some walnut for $6.80 a BF that was planed on two sides. The edges were both rough, but one edge was straight. I’m about 50-50 on whether I have one straight edge on most of this wood. So it will need to be planed, and probably jointed on one side to get one straight edge to run through a table saw. So under normal pricing how much difference does that make?

-- Mark Smith, Tracy, CA., http://www.markscustomwoodcrafts.com

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OnlyJustME

1562 posts in 1029 days


#22 posted 10-30-2012 11:08 PM

Maybe railing spindles? glue ups for cutting boards? small hobby turnings like pens, bottle stoppers, and such. chisel handles. Lots of different moldings of course. Window mullions. picture frames. Just a few quick brainstorms. As to an industry to unload the lot of them at one time i have no idea.
If i was closer i would totally grab a bundle of them for all different types of things. Maybe make small shippable bundles and sell them that way for hobbyists. It would take a bit of time so cost would have to reflect that but might not take as long as you might think to get rid of it all that way. then again it might.

-- In the end, when your life flashes before your eyes, will you like what you see?

View Mark Smith's profile

Mark Smith

497 posts in 693 days


#23 posted 10-30-2012 11:40 PM

I thought of some of those things Matt, but I want to be a woodworker, not a lumber seller. My concern is it would take me a couple of years to get rid of it all like that. Clearly no one or two or even three people would need all of these. I’d have to find 200 buyers to sell it all off like that. If somebody close enough to come pick all this up wants to do what Matt suggested, make me an offer on the entire pile and have at it. If somebody showed up tomorrow with $250 they could have the entire pile.

Each one of these boards is at least 1 board foot because they are 12 feet long. Some would be almost 2 board feet. I’m not going to go count all of these but my guess is there is at least 300 pieces there? So $250 makes it less than $1 a board foot for walnut. Retail price for Walnut at the Woodcraft store here is about $11 a bf. Of course that is planed boards of more useable widths.

-- Mark Smith, Tracy, CA., http://www.markscustomwoodcrafts.com

View robert triplett's profile

robert triplett

1481 posts in 1757 days


#24 posted 11-01-2012 05:22 AM

Sounds like you need to have a ‘fire sale’ and get rid of some of this. The narrow Walnut could be good for cutting boards if someone was close to you. I would be looking for larger widths. You remind me of someone else here who has too much wood from a furniture factory.

-- Robert, so much inspiration here, and so little time!

View Mark Smith's profile

Mark Smith

497 posts in 693 days


#25 posted 11-01-2012 03:08 PM

You can never have too much wood Robert! Oh yeah, I guess you can. I’d actually like to keep it all and never have to buy wood again. But it’s just taking up too much space. That and I have to pay for some of the tools I bought so hopefully I can make a little bit of money selling it. The rest of it is supposed to be in my shop this morning so I’ll have a chance to go through it and see exactly what I got and then post some prices.

-- Mark Smith, Tracy, CA., http://www.markscustomwoodcrafts.com

View Gshepherd's profile

Gshepherd

1472 posts in 854 days


#26 posted 11-01-2012 04:42 PM

Those are cut offs from the SLR saw. I have a ton of them as well and use them for q rounds, pen blanks, dowels and give a lot to some retired guys who can’t afford to go out and buy much lumber. Yesterday I SLR 3200 bf of some pop and it went right into the dumpster. If you can mill it to 3/4×3/4 I suggest making pen blanks and sell them by the box….. Hardly no money in it though. If your only looking for 250 for the lot list it on CL for 250 obo….. Get it out of your hair…...

-- What we do in life will Echo through Eternity........

View Mark Smith's profile

Mark Smith

497 posts in 693 days


#27 posted 11-01-2012 07:14 PM

I can’t see there being a lot of money in walnut pen blanks. People making pens are using more exotic woods.

-- Mark Smith, Tracy, CA., http://www.markscustomwoodcrafts.com

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Mark Smith

497 posts in 693 days


#28 posted 11-01-2012 10:13 PM

Okay wood is all at my shop and here’s what I’m looking at for prices:

Cherry 4/4 FAS Rough Sawn: $3.00 a BF
Ash 4/4 FAS Rough Sawn: $2.00 a BF
Walnut 4/4 Rough Sawn: $3.50 a BF
White Oak 4/4 Rough Sawn: $1.75 a BF
Hickory 4/4 Rough Sawn: $1.75 a BF

I have a lot of Cherry, Ash, and Hickory. The Hickory is mostly narrow boards while the Cherry and the Ash have a good variety of wider boards. I don’t have a lot of White Oak. I do have a lot of Walnut in 4” widths and a lot in 2 1/2” widths, but I kept all the wider boards for my personal supply. Also on the Jatoba I didn’t have as much as I originall thought so I’ve kept all of it for my personal supply. So it’s ready to go now, if you want any message me here or you can contact me through my webside.

-- Mark Smith, Tracy, CA., http://www.markscustomwoodcrafts.com

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Mark Smith

497 posts in 693 days


#29 posted 11-01-2012 10:22 PM

This is what I have available. The taller stack back by the door is the cherry. Those boards range from 14’ to 16’ but we can cut them in half for no charge. The stack to the left is the Hickory. The big stack in the very middle is the Ash. These are also 14’ to 16’ boards. The right lower corner is the White Oak. There are wider boards at the bottom of the stack. The stack to the left of the Ash is Yellow Pine. I didn’t price that but I’ll practically give that stuff away. I think it was marked as 4/4 FAS but it isn’t FAS. There is usable wood there, but there’s lots of defects in the boards. I’m thinking probably 50 cents a BF for that. The dark pile to the far left is the 4” wide walnut. It is some very nice wood. The next stack going up is mostly walnut on the bottom, but I started running out of room so that is some Ash scraps on top of it. And then the far upper left is all the Walnut scraps that I talked about in an above photo from yesterday. To the far right up against the wall is a combination of White Oak Scraps and then more Ask scraps under that. The scraps are all usable wood for making trim or small items and again I’ll practically give that stuff away. I was thinking $250.00 for that entire stack of Walnut and way less for the other types of wood. Make me an offer!

-- Mark Smith, Tracy, CA., http://www.markscustomwoodcrafts.com

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Mark Smith

497 posts in 693 days


#30 posted 11-01-2012 10:27 PM

And this is what I pulled out for my personal supply. I got those shelves at Home Depot and they claim they can hold 2,000 pounds per unit. I think I’m pushing them to the limit. Third self down from the top is the Jabota after I cut the 14’ to 16’ boards in half. That stuff weighed twice as much as a similar size piece of walnut. At least that’s what my back is telling me.

-- Mark Smith, Tracy, CA., http://www.markscustomwoodcrafts.com

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Gshepherd

1472 posts in 854 days


#31 posted 11-01-2012 11:03 PM

Well Mark, now that you gone through it all do you feel it was worth what you paid for it?

-- What we do in life will Echo through Eternity........

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Mark Smith

497 posts in 693 days


#32 posted 11-01-2012 11:30 PM

The wood that I took out for myself and put on the shevles, is worth more than what I paid for all of it. That’s why I’m letting everything else go for so cheap. I was just out measuring the stack of cherry and if my math is correct it is about 2,100 board feet. And it is some really nice wood.

-- Mark Smith, Tracy, CA., http://www.markscustomwoodcrafts.com

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Mark Smith

497 posts in 693 days


#33 posted 11-01-2012 11:38 PM

This one stack of walnut is a little over 500 board feet. I also just noticed that some of the wood is actually 5/4 (1 1/4” thick). The boards vary from 3 1/2” with to 5” width. They actually look like dirty 2 by 4’s but under that dirt and rough surface is Walnut!

-- Mark Smith, Tracy, CA., http://www.markscustomwoodcrafts.com

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Mark Smith

497 posts in 693 days


#34 posted 11-01-2012 11:42 PM

Here is a closer shot of the top layer of cherry. The boards are a full 1” thick but they don’t look rough sawn. I think they are all usable without planing. A belt sander should take care of them.

-- Mark Smith, Tracy, CA., http://www.markscustomwoodcrafts.com

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Gshepherd

1472 posts in 854 days


#35 posted 11-01-2012 11:49 PM

Mark, that is good to hear…. When I have a lot of misc wood I will get them in 100 bf bundles and put a good price on them and list them on CL. Keep in mind the stuff I have is usually no longer than 2-6 ft but 2-10in wide. Bundle them yourself with a mix on widths so you do not have someone taking all the wide stuff and leaving you with a bunch of narrows. I sell my cherry at 2.00 a bf this way it goes out the door pretty quick. It does not take long sometimes before I am tripping over what I call scraps.

Just saw the pics, looks like some nice 4/4 FAS material…..... That will be some nice clean cherry for someone…..

-- What we do in life will Echo through Eternity........

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Mark Smith

497 posts in 693 days


#36 posted 11-01-2012 11:58 PM

That’s a good idea. Right now most of these boards are 14 to 16 feet long. For now I’m going to keep them like that in case somebody wants that. I’ll see how sales go and adjust prices accordingly. I think $3 for the cherry is fair, but I’m willing to negotiate. Remember I’m in the SF bay area and my wholesale price for cherry is about $6 a BF. Retail price is about $8 a BF.

-- Mark Smith, Tracy, CA., http://www.markscustomwoodcrafts.com

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Gshepherd

1472 posts in 854 days


#37 posted 11-02-2012 12:11 AM

Wow…... yes adjust accordingly on price,,,,, I get my cherry at 3.10 bf here in colorado…. You have more transportation cost involved going a extra 1100 miles or so…. W Oak, 3,000 bf I got for 2.20 bf 6in and wider material….. FAS Steamed Walnut, 90 percent clear around here your looking at 8.00 a bf. That is my cost.

Mark, it pays to shop around, I have seen .80 to 1.00 diff between my suppliers…..

-- What we do in life will Echo through Eternity........

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Mark Smith

497 posts in 693 days


#38 posted 11-02-2012 01:11 AM

Yeah, I’ve noticed that. The supplier I have I went with because my neighbor has a stair shop and it’s the guy he uses. Since I don’t order giant lots of wood I get free delivery because my neighbor is getting deliveries every week so he just throws my stuff on with his. But I did find some cheaper prices at another supplier just yesterday. But as of right now I don’t think I have to buy wood again for a year anyway.

-- Mark Smith, Tracy, CA., http://www.markscustomwoodcrafts.com

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OnlyJustME

1562 posts in 1029 days


#39 posted 11-02-2012 04:15 AM

I so hate you right now. lol
Wish i could come across a deal like this in my neighborhood.

-- In the end, when your life flashes before your eyes, will you like what you see?

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