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All Replies on Ryobi batteries really are worthless, should I get Porter-Cable, DeWalt?

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View KevinBlair's profile

Ryobi batteries really are worthless, should I get Porter-Cable, DeWalt?

by KevinBlair
posted 624 days ago


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52 replies

52 replies so far

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

3318 posts in 2544 days


#1 posted 624 days ago

Give up on crap Ryobi stuff. I finally broke down and bought a Makita driver/drill 18v Lion after farting around with DeWalt batts. I’d buy it again but, for a circular saw, I stayin’ with a corded unit.
Wanna know how I REALLY feel?
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View Smallcrafter's profile

Smallcrafter

36 posts in 682 days


#2 posted 624 days ago

I use a Porter-Cable cordless drill and the 18v batteries hold up just fine. I bought a second battery to have in the charger and ready to go when the one I’m using starts to slow down. Ryobi products are OK for fast, easy work…kinda a household product and not woodworker quality.

-- 'The lyf so short, the craft so long to lerne.' - Chaucer

View crank49's profile

crank49

3323 posts in 1555 days


#3 posted 624 days ago

I have been very pleased with my Milwaukee 18v li-ion battery powered drill and impact driver tools.
So, then I bought a bare 18v circular saw, just to find out it requires the 3000AH XL battery.
Now I have to go buy a $100 battery to run this $200 saw. That’s insane.
I’ll have to agree with Bill on this one.

You need a corded circular saw for work in the shop.

If I was out contracting and working on job sites all day then maybe I could justify a battery saw.

-- Michael :-{| “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” ― A H

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

4693 posts in 1161 days


#4 posted 624 days ago

When you get tired of big store nonsense, and you add up the useless
batteries and frustrations, you come to the conclusion that is cheaper
to purchase expensive instead of throwing good money after bad.
I had the same problem with Ryobi batteries. I looked at a dozen useless
batteries and had a major epiphany.
Hello Festool.

View lumberjoe's profile

lumberjoe

2824 posts in 832 days


#5 posted 624 days ago

Rigid. Lifetime warranty even covers batteries.

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts

View nwbusa's profile

nwbusa

1016 posts in 870 days


#6 posted 624 days ago

I use a Dewalt 20V circular saw for breaking down sheet goods, quick crosscuts, etc. and it works great. That said, Joe makes a good point regarding the Ridgid tools—battery replacement warranty is not to be undervalued. I’ve had good luck with all of my Dewalt and Ridgid tools, and I have more than a few of each brand.

-- John, BC, Canada

View lumberjoe's profile

lumberjoe

2824 posts in 832 days


#7 posted 624 days ago

I’ve never had a cordless tool die; it’s always the batteries. By the time they do give out, they are impossible to find or they are absurdly expensive. I didn’t even look at anything else other than the Ridgid when my Milwaukee finally stopped charging. I got the combo with the drill/driver and the impact driver for 179.99. This will probably be the last set I own.

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11638 posts in 2272 days


#8 posted 624 days ago

So far my PC and DeWalt batteries are running neck and neck….what surprises me is my 20+ year old Makita’s still take and hold a charge !! Mistakenly bought a Craftsman set-up and never got any real use out of it at all , even though it was 18 volts : (
Surprised that your Li-Ion isn’t holding up….I only have Ni-Cads for comparison.

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

View KevinBlair's profile

KevinBlair

36 posts in 909 days


#9 posted 623 days ago

Thanks guys! It looks like almost anything other than Ryobi will be an improvement. I am going to check out CPO. The life-time warranty from Rigid sounds good, but it seems PC and Dewalt are fine.

I understand the Festool recommendation, but I think that is overkill for my level of use.

Like NWBUSA, my primary use of the circular saw is to break down sheet goods. I have a corded saw, but I find it harder to control than the smaller 18v saw. I can keep the 18v saw tight to the guide and get a near perfect cut. I know I could get the Festool or Dewalt track saw, but that takes us back into the overkill for a home/hobby level.

There are a lot of negative reviews of the Ryobi batteries, including their Li-ion ones. I didn’t do any real research before buying the Ryobi combo kit on sale a Christmas or two ago for something like $89.00. I think I have gotten my $89.00 worth and will keep using the drill, worklight, and even the vacuum that came with the kit.

View toolie's profile

toolie

1713 posts in 1212 days


#10 posted 623 days ago

kevinblair …..... i am a big ridgid fan. between myself and two family menbers, we have 15 combo kits and cordless power tools. THERE IS NO LIFETIME WARRANTY ON RIDGID HANDHELD AND STAIONARY POWER TOOLS. here is their warranty and what the LSA (lifetime service agrement) is:

http://www.ridgid.com/tools/power-tool-warranty

the lsa is available to the original owner of new qualifying tools. if your purchase from CPO is for a reconditioned tool, i believe such tools are ineligible for ridgid’s LSA. buying any other brand other than ridgid is, IMHO, foolish as all batteries eventually fail. ridgid’s LSA covers batteries, provided the new tool is properly registered with the program. i have never had a problem with the registration process. but then, i determined what the rules for successful registration were and followed them.

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

View lumberjoe's profile

lumberjoe

2824 posts in 832 days


#11 posted 623 days ago

Toolie, I completely agree. To me a cordless driver is a cordless driver. I’ve had just about every brand there is (except ryobi or HF). None completely blew me away, none completely sucked. Once I found out abut the Ridgid LSA any other brand was not even a consideration. I’ve got about 6 perfectly good cordless drivers that I spent over $100 on with completely dead batteries in my basement. Replacement batteries either aren’t available, or about $20 less than a new tool. You can have batteries rebuilt, but again the cost is prohibitive.

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5377 posts in 1816 days


#12 posted 623 days ago

If you want to make sure the battery doesn’t crap out on you. Don’t use cordless tools. Pretty simple solution if you ask me…

I’ve had cordless tools from Ryobi, Skil, B&D, Makita, and Ridgid. The BEST battery life I got out of any of them is with the green Ryobi 18V whatever the tech is on those… But generally speaking, cordless tools are IMHO mind you, sub par for anything you need reliability for…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View lumberjoe's profile

lumberjoe

2824 posts in 832 days


#13 posted 623 days ago

I agree there as well. Cordless drivers are the only cordless tools I own. I am not a big fan, but a cordless driver is really a valuable tool. I can get in places I simply cannot access with my Milwaukee magnum or my Makita corded driver.

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts

View KevinBlair's profile

KevinBlair

36 posts in 909 days


#14 posted 623 days ago

I am going to check out Rigid today at Home Depot. CPO has a PC combo (driver and Circular saw) package on sale for $80.00. Hard to beat that price.

I agree that the cordless drill/driver is the best use of these tools. The worklights also seem fine. I have not been impressed by the 18v saw or the vacuum in comparison to the corded models.

That said, I have experimented with cutting sheet goods with my corded circular saw and it always seems to wander quite a bit. This means for me, more waste, as I have to cut the boards wider to account for the wandering before final cutting on the table saw. This seems to be a standard problem, solved by the purchase of a track saw system (Festool or Dewalt).

Using the 18v circular saw is slower (especially when the batteries give out after a few minutes), but a lot easier to control. I am confident in making my cuts as little as 1/8” wider than needed as opposed to a couple of inches with the corded saw.

I have heard really nice things about Festool and Dewalt track saws, but either one would sit around the shop for months and months w/o any use. I want to get a good quality dovetail jig amongst other upgrades and would rather spend the money on those than on a track saw.

I will check this out today, but do either Rigid, Dewalt, or PC offer a corded adapter for their tools? Ryobi does not. An adapter would seem to offer the best of both worlds.

View Jamie Speirs's profile

Jamie Speirs

4065 posts in 1440 days


#15 posted 623 days ago

Makita 18v

Some of mine are 5yr old and I run six batteries

I buy when there is a special, like machine plus 3

batteries.

-- Who is the happiest of men? He who values the merits of others, and in their pleasure takes joy, even as though 'twere his own. --Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

View CampD's profile

CampD

1184 posts in 2070 days


#16 posted 623 days ago

I’ve been a remodeling contractor for over 25yrs, I can guarantee thier aren’t many more on here that use a cordless drill/driver more than me, so with that.

I run 2 Milwaukee cordless systems. 18v li-on complete set been in use daily for 5 yrs, batteries are starting to feel it (not lasting as long) I will buy new batts when needed.

2nd is a 10 yro 14.4v ni-cad drill/driver, this one stays in the shop. Finally just replaced the bushings and now is good as new. Original batts were dead (why I bought the 18v, cheaper to buy new) had bought a new batt for use in shop. Got a recall notice from Milwaukee that they had problems with batts melting down and would replace, free of charge, any that I had. Now have 3 good batts and I can see this tool lasting another 10 yrs easy.

I’m in the market for a small driver for the shop just for installing small screws, you can bet it will be a milwaukee.

-- Doug...

View ptweedy's profile

ptweedy

75 posts in 1977 days


#17 posted 623 days ago

why not goggle saw guide or just search lumber jocks for a saw guide. A properly made and used hardboard and plywood saw guide is easy to make and use. one tip when building dont glue the hardboard to the plywood the moisture in the glue will cause the plywood to warp making a high spot in the middle which is a pain to work around.

View lumberjoe's profile

lumberjoe

2824 posts in 832 days


#18 posted 623 days ago

Doug, I think that is the key. Batteries tend to last longer when used very frequently. It’s the occasional use and the long periods of being stagnant that degrades battery performance.

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts

View CampD's profile

CampD

1184 posts in 2070 days


#19 posted 623 days ago

Lumberjoe
I’ve got quite the collection of older drills with dead batteries that are just not worth replacing.

I might add, I’ve been on many a job site from commercial, new construction to remodeling and have seen every drill there is in hard use. To me, the ridged is one of the heavier, bigger models available and when your using it all day long size and weight DO matter.

Mikita would be my next choice, nice small balanced drill.

-- Doug...

View TheDane's profile (online now)

TheDane

3628 posts in 2247 days


#20 posted 623 days ago

There’s a reason contractors and installers opt for Makita … the contractor that did the framing work for my shop, the electricians that did my wiring, and the guy that installed my new garage doors were all using Makita and each of them swear by Makita.

I picked up a decent deal this spring on a Bosch 18 volt lithium-ion drill/driver with four batteries. So far it is a workhorse, but I have no idea how it will hold up in the long run.

I had a B&D ‘Firestorm’ system (circular saw, drill/driver with 2 batteries and a charger). The charger crapped out first, then I went through a couple of sets of batteries before I unloaded it. Sold it for $30 … should have sent the buyer a sympathy card!

—Gerry

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View HillbillyShooter's profile

HillbillyShooter

4260 posts in 876 days


#21 posted 623 days ago

Actually, I’ve had the best luck with the 18v Bosch battery for my jig saw. Recently purchased a Festool drill and so far so good, but I haven’t had it long enough to recommend the batteries.

-- John C. -- "Firearms are second only to the Constitution in importance; they are the peoples' liberty's teeth." George Washington

View toolie's profile

toolie

1713 posts in 1212 days


#22 posted 623 days ago

kevinblair ….... you can spend a lot on a festool or dewalt track system, or just make one of these:

http://www.familyhandyman.com/DIY-Tools---Tips/DIY-Skills/Tool-Skills/two-essential-saw-cutting-guides/View-All

best thing i ever made. dead straight cuts right where they should be for a fraction of what a track system costs. that should leave enough for the dovetail jig of your choice.

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

View lumberjoe's profile

lumberjoe

2824 posts in 832 days


#23 posted 623 days ago

I agree also that the Ridgid is probably not the first choice for pro work. But for someone like me who uses it very infrequently, the LSA is tough to beat.

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts

View Knothead62's profile

Knothead62

2332 posts in 1545 days


#24 posted 623 days ago

My question is- who makes the batteries? Are they made in the same factory like many other items- lathes, drills, etc. I recall that there are only five factories in the USA that make car batteries, no matter whose name is on them.

View RussellAP's profile

RussellAP

2935 posts in 870 days


#25 posted 623 days ago

DeWalt has been really good for me.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

View nwbusa's profile

nwbusa

1016 posts in 870 days


#26 posted 623 days ago

I rarely use my cordless tools outside of the shop. Even so, I will almost always grab a cordless tool before I bother with plugging in a corded version (I’m talking drills, drivers, and saws here). I sold my corded drills and reciprocating saw, though I kept my corded circular saw for the really tough jobs. I have five batteries for my 20V Dewalt tools, and they are 100% reliable with plenty of power.

-- John, BC, Canada

View 404 - Not Found's profile

404 - Not Found

2544 posts in 1553 days


#27 posted 623 days ago

I gave up on DeWalt NiCad batteries and have had better luck with Makita’s offerings.

View nwbusa's profile

nwbusa

1016 posts in 870 days


#28 posted 623 days ago

I gave up on all brands of NiCad batteries and went with modern battery technology—Lithium ion.

-- John, BC, Canada

View lumberjoe's profile

lumberjoe

2824 posts in 832 days


#29 posted 623 days ago

Can you even buy tools with NiCad batteries anymore? I thought they were all lithium

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts

View nwbusa's profile

nwbusa

1016 posts in 870 days


#30 posted 623 days ago

There’s still some NiCad stuff hanging on. I know DeWalt still sells the 18V XRP tools and replacement NiCad batteries. But yeah… I wouldn’t be buying any new tools with NiCads, myself.

-- John, BC, Canada

View lumberjoe's profile

lumberjoe

2824 posts in 832 days


#31 posted 623 days ago

I would never touch NiCad again. My favorite thing about lithium is there is no run down. You get full power then no power; not a half dead tool for 20 minutes.

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

1624 posts in 1506 days


#32 posted 623 days ago

I have been using Makita niacads for over 15 years and love them. I finally had to rebuild two of them last year at a cost of $21 each. The only cordless tool I use is my Makita drill and impact drivers. I am retired from construction sheet metal work where we ran these Makita impact drivers all day long with a charger and two batteries. Lithium batteries are way to fragile to suit me.

-- In God We Trust

View Wdwerker's profile

Wdwerker

331 posts in 817 days


#33 posted 623 days ago

Bosch! Wonderful tools and batteries! CPO bosch, I get most of mine as reconditioned tools.

-- Fine Custom Woodwork since 1978

View lab7654's profile

lab7654

249 posts in 831 days


#34 posted 623 days ago

I have a Ryobi set consisting of a drill, impact driver, circ. saw, sawzall, vacuum, worklight, 2 half-working batteries, and 2 dead ones. I bought it from my uncle for $50 and while the batteries are all sub-par, I’ve gotten my use out of them. Lumberjoe, thanks for letting me know about Rigid’s policy on the batteries. I’ll be checking out the drill/impact combo soon.

-- Tristin King -- When in doubt, sand it.

View BerBer5985's profile

BerBer5985

420 posts in 1004 days


#35 posted 623 days ago

Maybe I’m the only one who’s never had a problem with ryobi stuff. I’ve been beating the hell out of my ryobi 18v lithium ion drill for 3 years and never had a battery give up on me. Their newer green line products seem to fit my hand very well. I’ve also run the batteries in the 18v cordless weed eater and they keep on trucking. I almost bought the 12v version before I paid a little more to get the Milwaukee 12v hammer drill because I needed a light duty hammer drill and their line has a lot of useful tools I could see adding on to, but every talks crap about ryobi and I’ve remodeled my whole house, put a deck on, done many many many projects with that 18v drill and not once had a single task it couldn’t handle.

-- Greg, Owner, Quality Carpet One, www.qualitycarpetonecrofton.com

View KevinBlair's profile

KevinBlair

36 posts in 909 days


#36 posted 623 days ago

NiCad do seem to still be readily available. I have to agree with other posters regarding Ryobi tools as separate from the batteries. The tools are good. I have a corded random orbit sander and the combo kit. When the battery works, the saw makes a smooth, straight cut. I have used the drill/driver for hours on end. I do not know why the batteries are so bad in comparison to PC, Dewalt, etc. They do not seem to me (although I haven’t done extensive research) any cheaper than most of their competition. Perhaps one day a Ryobi rep will post a response??

I am leaning toward the CPO PC drill/saw combo. At $86.00 delivered (it is a recon) I don’t see how I can go wrong, although I understand I can do better. Things got too busy today to get to Home Depot to check out the Rigid options and I want to do that before a final choice.

Regarding the shop made track guide suggested by toolie: does this approach solve the wandering problem? I use a guide (an aluminum one I bought online or a longer piece of 3/4” plywood that I know is straight) clamped to the plywood sheet I am cutting. The track saws “lock” the saw to the guide so it cannot wander. The plans Toolie linked to do not seem to solve this problem???

Lastly: thanks to everyone that has posted!! I have found all of the contributions helpful and perhaps this post will save a few folks the frustration of buying Ryobi and perhaps Ryobi will hear and step up and do something…I may also hit the lottery one day if and when I actually buy a ticket :-)

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14549 posts in 2260 days


#37 posted 623 days ago

My vote is for Ridgid lifetime warranty.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View ChuckC's profile

ChuckC

679 posts in 1519 days


#38 posted 623 days ago

I’ve had the Milwaukee 18v Lithium Ion drill/driver combo for almost 3 years. They are still going strong. They have a lot of power and last a long time on a charge. I like the power meter on the batteries too.

View Willardz's profile

Willardz

56 posts in 894 days


#39 posted 623 days ago

I have the Ryobi 18 volt drill for shop use. It is on my list for replacement. The batteries I have no longer keep a charge. It has lasted me 2 years. I have been fortunate with my 19.2 volt crapsman cordless drill. It has lasted over 5 years, and is running strong. I use it for on location furniture repair work when needed.

-- I have Carrie, food, shelter, and wood to turn. What else do I need? http://www.willardwoodworking.com

View toolie's profile

toolie

1713 posts in 1212 days


#40 posted 622 days ago

kevinblair …. no, it is still theoretically possible to have the saw wander away from the fence on the guide i referenced. but in the 7 years since i’ve made and used mine, it’s never happened. firmly clamp the guide in place and maintain light pressure against the fence with the saw’s shoe. i like the idea of the track saws. i’m just too cheap to invest in one with two TSs in my shop.

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

View Swyftfeet's profile

Swyftfeet

169 posts in 755 days


#41 posted 622 days ago

Old tools to work like new?

Open the battery pack case, they usually have an array of small batteries. Figure out the battery size, they are labeled most times. If not, take the voltage and divide by number of batteries.

Order a bunch of rechargeable replacements for for 1/15th of what you could buy a replacement pack. Some solder and back to work… Done it a couple of times on an old NiiCad for the old man. He gets about 2-4 more years every time.

-- Brian

View Kenny Dunn's profile

Kenny Dunn

44 posts in 910 days


#42 posted 622 days ago

I have had several brands of cordless and here is my take. If you want the best of the main players, Milwaukee. I have some 18v stuff and they are workhorses. Bosch is up there too. Dewalt is mid pack, maybe not hardly as good as Makita, but fair. I have some Porter Cable stuff and the batteries are fantastic and the tools work pretty well, but they are not built very heavy. I love the little inflator and the grinder is pretty good, but the drill is marginal and the impact driver compared to my Milwaukee is a toy. If you need something light to intermediate duty go for it when its on sale at Lowes (they go on sale cheap, why I got into them). If you are a heavy user at least go Dewalt.

-- I saw an angel in the marble and I carved until I set him free-Michelangelo

View jusfine's profile

jusfine

2280 posts in 1510 days


#43 posted 622 days ago

I agree with Kenny’s post above, 18V LiOn powered Milwaukee is the way to go. Brushless motors!

Great prices on the combo kits now, batteries last a long time.

-- Randy "You are judged as much by the questions you ask as the answers you give..."

View nwbusa's profile

nwbusa

1016 posts in 870 days


#44 posted 622 days ago

Everyone has an opinion on the best brand of power tools. I personally would rank Dewalt and Makita over Milwaukee, and yep I’ve owned (and heavily used) ‘em all. At the end of the day, all of the top tier brands work pretty good. You’ll always hear someone say “I bought xxxxx brand and had two lemons in a row, never buying that crap again!” etc etc… these are the exceptions to the rule when you’re buying tools at this level.

-- John, BC, Canada

View TheDane's profile (online now)

TheDane

3628 posts in 2247 days


#45 posted 622 days ago

Milwaukee just ain’t what it used to be. When their tools were made in Milwaukee, they were top drawer. Now they are just another import.

—Gerry

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View mIps's profile

mIps

168 posts in 638 days


#46 posted 622 days ago

Maybe this is a dumb comment and, if so, I apologize. What I did was I made a tracksaw-like bed that my saw could run on with guides on both sides to make sure it tracked straight and then using a corded saw was no problem. I used 3/16 hardboard for the bed, so it’s decently rigid and I’m only losing that much cutting depth. It’s brilliant for breaking down sheet goods and you just need to make sure your bed rails are taller than your deepest cut.
It’s the same idea as the dado jig shown in this video.
Now that I have a router, I need to build me one of these. One more project added to the list.

-- Be honest, honorable, kind, work hard, and generally be awesome.

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11638 posts in 2272 days


#47 posted 622 days ago

Great video link , mIps ! Thank you : )

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

View KevinBlair's profile

KevinBlair

36 posts in 909 days


#48 posted 621 days ago

Hi mIps, not a dumb contribution to the discussion in any way.

I actually have this type of guide for my plunge router and use it to make dados. I just haven’t had good luck making straight cuts with my circular saw. I found that the 18v saw worked great with a standard straight edge and this seemed like a good solution; until the batteries started to show as a real weakness.

I am going to make a guide for my corded circular saw and give it a try. I may even opt to buy a new corded circular saw. The one I have is a B&D from sometime around 1984 when we bought our first house in Chicago.

Things have sort of morphed into separate topics: 1) how to use a circular saw to break down sheet goods in the most economical and efficient manner and 2) batteries for cordless tools.

it does seem that other companies (Dewalt, PC, Makita, Milwaukee) make better batteries than Ryobi. The mystery is why Ryobi batteries are not equal to the overall quality of their actual tools. As noted by many others, the convenience of the uncorded tools, especially drill/drivers is really nice to have for doing all kinds of work. I find the 18v saw easier to use and control as well as offering somewhat similar convenience as the drill/drivers. I wil say in Ryobi’s favor that it is only the saw that has given me frustration, not the drill/driver. I have not used Ryobi lawn or other tools with their batteries so cannot comment on them.

I have decided to buy the PC combo kit (driver/saw) from CPO. For $80.00 it seems like a good bet. I will continue to use the Ryobi drill/driver and the PC will replace a craftsman drill/driver that has worked fine, but the battery is starting to go. We’ll see how the PC 18v saw works. I will also build the guide for my circular saw. One way or the other, I will find a method of breaking down the sheets of plywood and someday get these kitchen cabinets built!

View KevinBlair's profile

KevinBlair

36 posts in 909 days


#49 posted 603 days ago

UPDATE:

A few days ago Jason Swanson from Ryobi contacted me. He had been following the Limberjocks postings and discussion of Ryobi batteries. He graciously offered to send me some replacement batteries.

Today I received a large box from Ryobi that contained their “Ultimate Combo Kit”!! That is 6 tools, 2 of their best batteries, charger, and a bag.

I am extremely surprised, but when you hear that companies “don’t stand behind their products like they used too”; I hope you will think of this story and this very magnanimous gesture.

I will be putting them to work soon, probably tomorrow. I am hopeful that these new batteries will work well. As I said before, the Ryobi tools have been great, the batteries have been the issue.

Thanks again to everyone who posted and BTW, I did build the circular saw guide as suggested by toolie and it works great! Now I hope I can get these kitchen cabinets done over the winter and the new kitchen installed next spring.

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11638 posts in 2272 days


#50 posted 603 days ago

Lucky Dawg ! Keep us posted on the new tools and batteries : )

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

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