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View mochasatin's profile

Identify this wood

by mochasatin
posted 10-22-2012 07:48 PM


40 replies so far

View Gshepherd's profile

Gshepherd

1689 posts in 954 days


#1 posted 10-22-2012 09:04 PM

Mahogany, Africian maybe?????

-- What we do in life will Echo through Eternity........

View mochasatin's profile

mochasatin

33 posts in 1715 days


#2 posted 10-22-2012 09:06 PM

No, it would be native to Southern Michigan. It has been in the barn for many decades.

View Cosmicsniper's profile

Cosmicsniper

2199 posts in 1911 days


#3 posted 10-22-2012 09:10 PM

Butternut looks more like oak in its grain structure and appearance. I’m with Gshepherd…looks like mahogany to me.

-- jay, www.allaboutastro.com

View DaleM's profile

DaleM

924 posts in 2136 days


#4 posted 10-22-2012 09:11 PM

I know you think this must be native to Michigan, but I’m about 90% sure or better that it is mahogany, probably cuban.

-- Dale Manning, Carthage, NY

View mochasatin's profile

mochasatin

33 posts in 1715 days


#5 posted 10-22-2012 09:25 PM

You can’t tell by the picture, but the wood is very light weight. Mahogany is much heavier. To me, the grain pattern looks a lot like Walnut which is why I thought of Butternut because its nickname is “White Walnut” and is supposed look nearly identical to Walnut when stained.

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

5301 posts in 1329 days


#6 posted 10-22-2012 09:32 PM

Maghony

View blackcherry's profile

blackcherry

3209 posts in 2576 days


#7 posted 10-22-2012 09:36 PM

Mahogany here as well…99.9 sure…BC

View DaleM's profile

DaleM

924 posts in 2136 days


#8 posted 10-22-2012 09:37 PM

If you look at this project of mine, it is a close match. This is unstained, just water-based poly and if you look at the last pic before the finish was on it, you will see it looks a lot like what you have. It is fairly lightweight, compared to maple or oak, but slightly heavier than pine. http://lumberjocks.com/projects/47306

If you look at this project, you will see what butternut looks like.
http://lumberjocks.com/projects/51416

I have been known to be wrong, a lot if you ask my wife.

-- Dale Manning, Carthage, NY

View mochasatin's profile

mochasatin

33 posts in 1715 days


#9 posted 10-22-2012 09:51 PM

I am not complaining if it is Mahogany, I just can’t for the life of me see how it would be Mahogany. If it is, there is a ton of it in rough cut boards in the barn. My father had about 10K board feet of domestic hardwood in the barn. Most of it he slabbed himself with a chainsaw mill. I just don’t see him forking up the cash for the Mahogany when he had access to so much native hardwood – ash, white oak, red oak, black cherry, walnut etc. Is it possible it could be heartwood from a native species?

View mochasatin's profile

mochasatin

33 posts in 1715 days


#10 posted 10-22-2012 10:02 PM

It really does look like Mahogany though when I compare the samples to the pictures. My father never mentioned that he had it. I guess this is a good problem to have.

View Gshepherd's profile

Gshepherd

1689 posts in 954 days


#11 posted 10-22-2012 10:23 PM

Michigan, Great Lakes, connection….... Boating….... Boats, Mahogany…... I have Quilted Mahogany, Santos,Africian,Cuban,Hondarus,Mahg Crotch Panels galore vs any other wood in my shop and when I saw the pic that is what slapped me in the face….. Santos is very heavy and dense, From what I see you have some nice mahogany there, as Dale mentioned cuban, you could have some pretty sweet stuff there….. Are any of the boards fuzzy???? Even when rough cut you will get fuzzy’s….. Other than Santos, not a true mahogany in my book, the mahoganys are fairly light weight anyway…. Great to work with, Wood of the kings and queens from days gone by…..

-- What we do in life will Echo through Eternity........

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mochasatin

33 posts in 1715 days


#12 posted 10-22-2012 10:40 PM

I am pretty excited. I thought it was a bunch of old rough cut black cherry and didn’t bother to look closer since I have a lot of black cherry already. Most of them are thick boards 6/4 to 8/4 around 7 to 14” wide. What a nice surprise.

View ShaneA's profile (online now)

ShaneA

5452 posts in 1351 days


#13 posted 10-22-2012 10:44 PM

Another vote for some type of Mahogany. Super score.

View WhoMe's profile

WhoMe

1127 posts in 1996 days


#14 posted 10-22-2012 11:04 PM

Maybe it is a balsa/mahogany hybrid

sorry, slow day job hunting….

Like Shane said, great score.

-- I'm not clumsy.. It's just the floor hates me, the tables and chairs are bullies and the wall gets in the way.. - Mike -

View Cosmicsniper's profile

Cosmicsniper

2199 posts in 1911 days


#15 posted 10-22-2012 11:28 PM

Keep in mind most all woodworkers probably aren’t that rational when in comes to wood. I could have a orchard of walnut, cherry, and pecan tree, enough to last ten lifetimes…and I’d probably still find a way to hoard all the mahogany I could!

Good for you. That’s some beautiful wood.

-- jay, www.allaboutastro.com

View mochasatin's profile

mochasatin

33 posts in 1715 days


#16 posted 10-22-2012 11:43 PM

It comes down to storage. I can only hold so much in my shop and I go to the barn stash when the shop needs a refill. I can’t think of a single project my father made from Mahogany. I wonder if he forgot about it or maybe my grandfather had put it in the barn a long time ago and didn’t tell anyone. There are no lights in the barn so it is real hard to see what wood you are grabbing. We had the wood roughly segregated into piles by species.

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mochasatin

33 posts in 1715 days


#17 posted 10-22-2012 11:56 PM

Thanks everyone. I need to come up with a project now. I will hopefully be posting something in the near future made from Mahogany.

View blackcherry's profile

blackcherry

3209 posts in 2576 days


#18 posted 10-23-2012 02:17 AM

My first thought is Mahogany and it a good guess looking at this a sec. time it has grain flow like pecan as well. The pic really lack guilty color, pecan has a brownish blonde hue UN-finish where Mahogany has a range of color from a salmon pinkish tone to golden brown and redish brown colors depending on where it was grown . Wet the wood down with some mineral spirits and post a new pick and let have a sec. go at it…BC

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1215 posts in 1229 days


#19 posted 10-23-2012 02:59 AM

Walnut and Butternut are semi ring porous, like in the pic. I believe that it is indeed butternut. Nobody would build a barn in Michigan out of Mahogany.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT15 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

View mochasatin's profile

mochasatin

33 posts in 1715 days


#20 posted 10-23-2012 03:07 AM

Here is a picture of Butternut with a description

DESCRIPTION: Butternut is considerably softer and lighter than its close relative, black walnut. The heartwood is light tan with pinkish or amber tones, sometimes with darker brown streaks; the narrow sapwood is white. Butternut has a coarser texture than black walnut. It machines easily, but sanding may cause a fuzzy surface unless fine-grit abrasives are used. It finishes well. The figure is virtually identical to black walnut. Used in light-duty furniture applications, cabinets, paneling and trim, but not for applications where it would be subject to denting or abuse.

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1215 posts in 1229 days


#21 posted 10-23-2012 11:47 AM

Yes, you have butternut.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT15 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

View Tennessee's profile

Tennessee

1578 posts in 1267 days


#22 posted 10-23-2012 11:52 AM

I’m going with a Phillipine or Honduras Mahogany, which looks exactly like that, and is light to boot. It could have been one or two planked trees, brought in by boat to manufacture furniture, a lot of which used to be manufactured in the upper Midwest, and also could have been originally bound for a stringed instrument factory, like the HUGE Epiphone, which used to be in Kalamazoo.

-- Paul, Tennessee, http://www.tsunamiguitars.com

View mochasatin's profile

mochasatin

33 posts in 1715 days


#23 posted 10-23-2012 12:07 PM

I guess the debate continues. The case against Butternut is that it lacks an odor when it is cut and it has a significant red hue. However, it is very dry and odor may not be noticable. The wood was not used in barn construction. It is part of a wood collection my father had accumulated over many years. If it is Mahogany then it will be the only exotic wood my father had in the barn.

View mochasatin's profile

mochasatin

33 posts in 1715 days


#24 posted 10-23-2012 01:17 PM

Below are two new pictures of the wood with tung oil applied. I have also provided an end grain
picture. The majority of woodworkers say its mahogany. The wood is quarter sawn and darker near the heart becoming lighter moving away from the heart. I should try to find some plain sawn pieces.

View racerglen's profile

racerglen

2400 posts in 1533 days


#25 posted 10-23-2012 01:23 PM

I have a coffee table from shipwreck salvage that looks exactly like the bottom picture

mahogany

-- Glen, Vernon B.C. Canada

View mochasatin's profile

mochasatin

33 posts in 1715 days


#26 posted 10-23-2012 01:24 PM

Hey WDHLT15. Is that you Danny from Perry Georgia? This is Scott Harrison. You helped me set up my Hardwood Plantation a couple years ago. How are you doing?

View Tennessee's profile

Tennessee

1578 posts in 1267 days


#27 posted 10-23-2012 05:17 PM

One of the cases against butternut is it sometimes has a dark streak in it, and it has a tendency to occasionally have a pith running through it. I don’t see any examples of that here.
I’m sticking with mahogany, albeit a lower quality species. Still a great score, no matter what!

-- Paul, Tennessee, http://www.tsunamiguitars.com

View Rick M.'s profile

Rick M.

4508 posts in 1133 days


#28 posted 10-23-2012 09:33 PM

If you handed me that wood and told me it was mahogany I wouldn’t question it because it looks just like the mahogany in my shop. It doesn’t look anything like butternut to me.

Mahogany is actually a relatively light hardwood and fairly soft.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View DS's profile

DS

2132 posts in 1173 days


#29 posted 10-23-2012 10:19 PM

I can see how everyone gets Mahoganey from this picture.

My first impression was Lyptus…

It’s a little harder to tell form pictures.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View ShaneA's profile (online now)

ShaneA

5452 posts in 1351 days


#30 posted 10-23-2012 11:42 PM

I am sticking w/mahogany. No matter what it is, hopefully you will put it to good use, cause it looks nice, and worthy of a project or three.

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1215 posts in 1229 days


#31 posted 10-24-2012 01:01 AM

Two things to note. The wood was not used to construct the barn and was part of a wood stash. Second, that last pic shows the ribbon stripe from the spiral grain of mahogany. The cells in the annual rings orient at different angles in different years resulting in that ribbon stripe. I have moved to the Mahogany Camp full force!

Scott, yes I am Danny from Perry, GA. Did you get the little trees planted? If I remember right, that was in Michigan, too, right? Is the same property with the barn?

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT15 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

View mochasatin's profile

mochasatin

33 posts in 1715 days


#32 posted 10-24-2012 01:09 AM

Hi Danny. Yes, the same property. We have 24,000 hardwoods planted so far. We have another 12000 to plant this spring under the current CRP contract. It has been a lot of work, but very rewarding.

View mochasatin's profile

mochasatin

33 posts in 1715 days


#33 posted 10-24-2012 01:38 AM

I sifted through the boards again today and found a couple with printed numbers stamped on them. So somewhere along the line my father or grandfather either purchased or were given these boards and stacked them in the barn. Everybody must have forgotten about them. They clearly were not cut at the farm as there would be no need to stamp them.

View mochasatin's profile

mochasatin

33 posts in 1715 days


#34 posted 10-24-2012 01:39 AM

Mahogany it is. I guess we can retire this thread now. Thanks for your help everyone.

View KarenW's profile

KarenW

124 posts in 941 days


#35 posted 10-24-2012 10:00 AM

Absolutely – mahogany!
I’ve carved too much of this stuff to not know it right off.
You lucky dog.

-- Happiness does not come from doing easy work but from the afterglow of satisfaction that comes after the achievement of a difficult task that demanded our best. --Theodore I. Rubin

View Gshepherd's profile

Gshepherd

1689 posts in 954 days


#36 posted 10-24-2012 02:26 PM

Or…. It is some infestation that will spread into your other stashes of lumber there and lucky for you I can take that infested mahogany lookin stuff off your hands for you…...

-- What we do in life will Echo through Eternity........

View mochasatin's profile

mochasatin

33 posts in 1715 days


#37 posted 10-24-2012 02:31 PM

LOL – These boards are long and flat. Mostly 6/4 by 15-17 feet long and 12”+ widths.

View HerbC's profile

HerbC

1215 posts in 1612 days


#38 posted 10-24-2012 03:58 PM

My dad ordered 1,000 BF of rough Honduras Mahogany from an importer in Mobile, AL when we were building our home in 1963. I think he paid less than $800 for it, including shipping via rail to the nearest REA station in North Florida. We planned to use it to build in furniture (desks, book shelves, etc…) in the house we were building. When the lumber arrived he nearly cried. The boards were all 18 – 36 inches wild, 5/4 thick and 16 ft long. We had to cut them in half (length) because we only had a six foot trailer. We had to rip them down to 12 inches wide because we only had a twelve inch planer. It still made some beautiful furniture.

-- Herb, Florida - Here's why I close most messages with "Be Careful!" http://lumberjocks.com/HerbC/blog/17090

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1215 posts in 1229 days


#39 posted 10-25-2012 04:05 AM

Awesome!

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT15 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

View WoodYard's profile

WoodYard

35 posts in 1764 days


#40 posted 10-26-2012 12:46 AM

Mahogany. Honduras weighs about 3/lbs/bf, African about 4.5 – 5.

-- Rick Wood TheWoodYard.com

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