LumberJocks

All Replies on Save me from a foolish mistake with Canola Oil

  • Advertise with us
View Murdock's profile

Save me from a foolish mistake with Canola Oil

by Murdock
posted 09-28-2012 11:14 PM


27 replies so far

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

6975 posts in 1913 days


#1 posted 09-28-2012 11:25 PM

Lacking in knowledge on the matter, I would probably coat the entire piece with canola oil, wipe off, let dry, and then continue with your original plan for finishing.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View Moron's profile

Moron

4929 posts in 2892 days


#2 posted 09-28-2012 11:26 PM

acetone might help, albeit very explosive but it will dissipate the oil with multiple applications

Years ago I did the same thing, and the marks are still there today but I didnt use acetone/alcohol/naptha

You might be best to remove affected parts

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

View Dallas's profile

Dallas

3524 posts in 1486 days


#3 posted 09-28-2012 11:33 PM

Rape seed oil, (Canola), will go rancid over time, but if you wiped it up quickly and inundate the surface with mineral oil, then use your Watco finish it should be OK.

What will happen is that the mineral oil should mix with the Canola and dilute it to the point that it’s a non issue.

If not, you can use the old acetone trick to draw the oil out, but with red oak it will probably go on through to the bottom.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

6975 posts in 1913 days


#4 posted 09-28-2012 11:40 PM

What these folks are saying is that these solvents will dilute the canola oil, NOT remove it. That said, I would STILL recommend cover ALL, wiping it off, THEN try using the solvents. This way ALL of the project will at least be treated equally and you just MIGHT end up without streaks. NO guarantee, but what is there to lose at this point.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View Murdock's profile

Murdock

112 posts in 1483 days


#5 posted 09-28-2012 11:58 PM

Thanks for the suggestions guys

I am inclined to go the route of covering at least the top where the majority of the hit with canola is as HorizontalMike suggests then wipe off and then try the acetone

I guess if it goes bad then I can replace the parts, it is the top and some dripping on a side, I am thinking that the side won’t be too noticeable.

-- "Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new." - Albert Einstein

View crank49's profile

crank49

3846 posts in 1970 days


#6 posted 09-29-2012 01:06 AM

You could seal it with dewaxed shellac, but I don’t know how that would affect your finishing plans.

-- Michael: Hillary has a long list of accomplishments, though most DAs would refer to them as felonies.

View longgone's profile

longgone

5688 posts in 2308 days


#7 posted 09-29-2012 01:11 AM

I also agree with covering the entire top with canola oil and blend in the stained part.
Canola oil is great for making a roux but never used it for a wood finish before.

View JJohnston's profile

JJohnston

1613 posts in 2290 days


#8 posted 09-29-2012 01:20 AM

You might try “whiting” along with the acetone. It’s sold by gunsmith suppliers, buti t’s nothing but chalk dust. You mix it with the acetone to make a paste and slather it on. The acetone dissolves the oil and the absorbent quality of the chalk helps draw it out.

-- "A man may conduct himself well in both adversity and good fortune, but if you want to test his character, give him power." - Abraham Lincoln

View madts's profile

madts

1522 posts in 1339 days


#9 posted 09-29-2012 01:32 AM

I will say any vegetable oil is oil. Just do NOT use engine or transmission oil!

-- Thor and Odin are still the greatest of Gods.

View Clint Searl's profile

Clint Searl

1509 posts in 1360 days


#10 posted 09-29-2012 02:11 AM

The previous comments have no basis in chemistry or experience. All you need to do is scrub it well with a strong solution of dishwasher detergent and hot water, followed by a hot water rinse. Repeat. After it dries, proceed with your usual finishing schedule.

-- Clint Searl....Ya can no more do what ya don't know how than ya can git back from where ya ain't been

View JJohnston's profile

JJohnston

1613 posts in 2290 days


#11 posted 09-29-2012 02:19 AM

Well, no experience other than that I’ve used whiting & acetone to draw old cosmoline out of wooden rifle stocks, that is.

-- "A man may conduct himself well in both adversity and good fortune, but if you want to test his character, give him power." - Abraham Lincoln

View Deycart's profile

Deycart

443 posts in 1257 days


#12 posted 09-29-2012 08:00 AM

After following everyone’s advise I would try to use some japan dryer on it to get the residual oil that you cant get out to harden. Just use a generous amount of it and do it outside!

View Clint Searl's profile

Clint Searl

1509 posts in 1360 days


#13 posted 09-29-2012 08:50 AM

JJohnston—-You’re wasting money on the acetone when mineral spirits or naptha will work better.

Deycart—-Japan drier will have no effect on an oil that does not polymerize.

-- Clint Searl....Ya can no more do what ya don't know how than ya can git back from where ya ain't been

View Grandpa's profile

Grandpa

3243 posts in 1675 days


#14 posted 09-29-2012 08:37 PM

I agree with H-Mike when he says the solvents will dilute the oil and allow it to go further into the wood. Anyone here ever remove an oil spot off wallpaper? Use talc and let it draw the oil out. I think I would try to dilute it with a solvent and then place the table (oily side down) onto some corn starch that is spread evenely on some newspaper. Let it sit for a day or two then vacuum the corn starch out of the pores of the wood.

View Moron's profile

Moron

4929 posts in 2892 days


#15 posted 09-30-2012 01:46 PM

Certainly no chemist here but I did own an old antique boat where I had to paint the bottom of the hull that was saturated in engine oil. A local boat builder recommended I use acetone (outside ) and I did. I poured acetone on the inside and much to my surprise the oil started dripping from the underside of the hull and pooled on the top so I could remove the oil.

Having said that, …………. it sounds like an easy solution is to start over : ((

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

View JJohnston's profile

JJohnston

1613 posts in 2290 days


#16 posted 09-30-2012 03:52 PM

Except I can’t stand the smell of mineral spirits (even the “odorless”) and I think I may actually be developing a sensitivity to it – I seem to feel sick for a day or so after I use it.

-- "A man may conduct himself well in both adversity and good fortune, but if you want to test his character, give him power." - Abraham Lincoln

View Danpaddles's profile

Danpaddles

546 posts in 1311 days


#17 posted 09-30-2012 04:34 PM

Clint had it right- this ain’t complicated. Soap and water.

-- Dan V. in Indy

View Jamie Speirs's profile

Jamie Speirs

4166 posts in 1856 days


#18 posted 09-30-2012 05:10 PM

cover the full piece in the oil (as Mike suggested

let it dry and wash with turpentine the carry on.

jamie

-- Who is the happiest of men? He who values the merits of others, and in their pleasure takes joy, even as though 'twere his own. --Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

View Murdock's profile

Murdock

112 posts in 1483 days


#19 posted 10-02-2012 12:19 AM

I ended up covering everything on the top with the oil, wiping off, then acetone. Don’t really know how to tell for sure it got the oil out as it doesn’t really look that much different, I guess it had sort of a ‘wet’ look to it that it doesn’t really have anymore so the surface is cleaner for sure.

I let it dry overnight then sanded and finished… Looks ok so far, I guess time will tell if it is going to become rancid.

-- "Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new." - Albert Einstein

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

6975 posts in 1913 days


#20 posted 10-02-2012 12:23 AM

I don’t think you will have any rancid issues. I just hope that the entire piece blends away any distracting blotches. Keep us posted.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View Brewmaster's profile

Brewmaster

1 post in 2 days


#21 posted 08-27-2015 10:56 PM

I know this is resurrecting an old post but I thought it deserved an experienced reply. I use Canola oil regularly to finish antique furniture with only positive results. Rubbed into furniture with a rag or microfibre cloth it finishes beautifully with no residue, stickiness or rancidity. I’m not sure where the rancidity issue came from in the first place. Canola is a semi-drying oil not unlike linseed oil. Boiled linseed oil has dryers added to it to make it a drying oil but it’s still a vegetable oil. As is Tung oil. On furniture it looks and acts very similar to both and never smells. I have some furniture that I finished over 3 years ago that looks awesome.

Take it for what it’s worth.

Kelvin

View patcollins's profile (online now)

patcollins

1284 posts in 1864 days


#22 posted 08-27-2015 11:23 PM

Ok, this is going to sound weird but as a bowler I use this technique to get the lane oil out of my bowling balls (they are porous). I put them into a bucket with kitty litter, clean litter of course, then I put them in my car in the sun in the summer. This causes the oil to be squeezed out of the balls and it gets absorbed by the kitty litter.

So you could try heating the wood and having kitty litter around it to absorb the oil.

View Finisherman's profile

Finisherman

222 posts in 848 days


#23 posted 08-27-2015 11:55 PM

You might try using a solution consisting of roughly a cup of household ammonia in a quart of water. This will emulsify the oil. Next, rinse the chair with plain water, perhaps with a little bit of vinegar added. Let the wood dry, sand off the raised grain and proceed with finishing. Since you used oak for your project, the only caveat concerns the fact that the ammonia might case the oak to darken, though in that dilute a solution, I rather doubt it. Alternatively, you can try washing the wood with a dish detergent like Dawn in a pail of water. I’ve used the ammonia solution to remove petroleum oil stain from a maple chair, with great success. BTW, the ammonia solution can be helpful to prevent fisheyes if you suspect, or have found out the hard way, that your wood is contaminated with silicone oil.

View daddywoofdawg's profile

daddywoofdawg

645 posts in 574 days


#24 posted 08-28-2015 02:23 AM

Wipe scrub with dawn,or if the oil has dried place white newspaper(not the colored inserts)over the oil stain and iron the newspaper at med setting, the newspaper will soak up the oil,the iron warms up the oil.

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

16209 posts in 2675 days


#25 posted 08-28-2015 04:18 AM

This thread is 3 years old. How did it turn out Murdock?

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Murdock's profile

Murdock

112 posts in 1483 days


#26 posted 08-28-2015 02:03 PM

It turned out just fine.

There is a small spot on one of the legs that I believe got splashed with the oil that is ‘slightly’ different color than the rest, but I may be just being picky.

The top where most of the issue was you can’t even tell the difference, as I noted originally I coated the rest of the top with oil and cleaned it all off again to try to keep it even. As I recall the finish didn’t soak in as easily as it would normally but no appreciable difference in color in the end.

-- "Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new." - Albert Einstein

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

16209 posts in 2675 days


#27 posted 08-28-2015 07:18 PM

thanks for the update. Good to know.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com