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View KylesWoodworking's profile

What do you call this oak??

by KylesWoodworking
posted 09-25-2012 12:39 AM


19 replies so far

View lew's profile

lew

10032 posts in 2410 days


#1 posted 09-25-2012 12:53 AM

It might be a form of spalting, but, I’m not sure.

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View Nicky's profile

Nicky

636 posts in 2746 days


#2 posted 09-25-2012 01:03 AM

Maybe insect damage of some type.

The pic is dark, anyway to throw a bit more light?

-- Nicky

View Dallas's profile

Dallas

2906 posts in 1142 days


#3 posted 09-25-2012 01:05 AM

I’m not an expert but I played one once.

We probably need some better pictures that can be enlarged and also some of the end grain that can be enlarged.

If you have any pictures of the living tree with leaves it would help a lot, not one you think looks like it but the original.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

View KylesWoodworking's profile

KylesWoodworking

280 posts in 1347 days


#4 posted 09-25-2012 01:14 AM

Here is a better close up:

And some end grain:

I sorry but i do not have a picture of the tree.

Thanks guys

-- http://www.kyleswoodworking.com http://www.facebook.com/kyleswoodworking

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

5456 posts in 2030 days


#5 posted 09-25-2012 01:22 AM

Acne oak….aka zit oak, and apaloosa oak.

;-)

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View Dallas's profile

Dallas

2906 posts in 1142 days


#6 posted 09-25-2012 01:28 AM

Basically it’s Red Oak. What you show is flat sawn, and if you quarter sawed some of it you would see a lot of flecks and rays.

It’s nice looking wood, but I’m not certain what actual type it is. The black spots look like small branches that started and died.

I have a lot of different red oaks here, along with a couple of nice white oaks, but none of them match that.

If it’s red oak don’t use it for an end grain cutting board. The pores are too large and will harbor bacteria.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

View KylesWoodworking's profile

KylesWoodworking

280 posts in 1347 days


#7 posted 09-25-2012 01:44 AM

Dallas,
I was think that they where branches too, but I seconded guessed myself because there are hundreds of them throughout the boards and it does seem that there would be so much branches on one tree.
Kyle

-- http://www.kyleswoodworking.com http://www.facebook.com/kyleswoodworking

View Wdwerker's profile

Wdwerker

333 posts in 888 days


#8 posted 09-25-2012 02:18 AM

Some tree respond to damage, stress or heavy pruning of the canopy by sprouting dormant leaf buds all up and down the trunk. Could be hundreds of them. Storm damage, insect infestation, who knows?

-- Fine Custom Woodwork since 1978

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

10874 posts in 1345 days


#9 posted 09-25-2012 02:22 AM

That looks like red oak with a lot of beautiful “pin knots” in it. I have seen this in many different woods (even pine) and I am always looking for more of it! I have no idea what causes this.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11659 posts in 2342 days


#10 posted 09-25-2012 03:09 AM

Looks like Red Oak Burl Wannabe…seen a lot of it over the years , but don’t know the exact cause.

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

View rance's profile

rance

4132 posts in 1815 days


#11 posted 09-25-2012 03:16 AM

Yep, looks like acne oak to me too.

-- Backer boards, stop blocks, build oversized, and never buy a hand plane--

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112089 posts in 2232 days


#12 posted 09-25-2012 03:45 AM

It’s good old freckled Oak. :))

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View cabmaker's profile

cabmaker

1311 posts in 1463 days


#13 posted 09-25-2012 03:56 AM

There are approx. 235 species of oak. Enjoy !

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

14188 posts in 993 days


#14 posted 09-25-2012 06:22 AM

Sometimes mother nature just does things differently in a tree. Don’t spend too much time wondering about it. Just enjoy the fact that you have it.

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it.

View aerynnbrook's profile

aerynnbrook

1 post in 725 days


#15 posted 09-25-2012 07:22 AM

I think it is a teakwood.

View KylesWoodworking's profile

KylesWoodworking

280 posts in 1347 days


#16 posted 09-25-2012 11:02 AM

Thanks everyone for the suggestions!
But i think i am going to go with gfadvm and call them “pin knots” because that is what they look like to me the me the most.
Kyle

-- http://www.kyleswoodworking.com http://www.facebook.com/kyleswoodworking

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1130 posts in 1130 days


#17 posted 09-25-2012 11:14 AM

Wdwerker is right. Those pin knots are caused by epicormic buds in the bark that sprouted after surrounding trees were cut, letting sunlight directly hit the bole of the tree whereas before it was shaded. This stimulated the buds to grow. These epicormic branches will be small and can totally cover the bole of the tree. I also agree that it is a red oak, but there is no way to tell from the wood which species it is as the wood of the red oak group is structurally indistinguishable. However, form and shade tolerance differ among the red oaks, and given that you are located in NE PA, it is almost certain to be black oak, Quercus velutina. Northern red oak, the other red oak common in your area, generally does not produce epicormic branches to the extent shown in your pictures.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT15 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln

View EPJartisan's profile

EPJartisan

1056 posts in 1780 days


#18 posted 09-26-2012 04:06 PM

I like your knowledge base WDHLT15. We should do a research project together here for LJ’s… tree specific. I state often and firmly believe… if you know your tree, you know to work with your material. I was just going to write something similar to your’s, but you are far more concise.. I love forest biology and ecology, but my mind is all book and studio research and long vacations in the northern midwest forests… I love that you have hands on experience in the field, it makes the brain see differently. I already work occasionally with an Arborist here in Chicago-land, but having a resource like you, someone who cuts apart trees, is excellent to have access to. One of the major reasons I enjoy this site… at any moment someone can shine with new information… and i want to learn everything.

-- " 'Truth' is like a beautiful flower, unique to each plant and to the season it blossoms ... 'Fact' is the root and leaf, allowing the plant grow and bloom again."

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1130 posts in 1130 days


#19 posted 09-27-2012 12:00 PM

Eric,

Thank you for the kind words. I made my living in Forestry and wood. While in Graduate School, I was a Teaching Assistant for the Wood Technology class. It included wood ID. I also competed in the tree and wood ID competitions among all the Southern Forestry Schools, so I studied and studied and studied. Some of that must have stuck! Becoming a woodworker just completed the circle.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT15 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln

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