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View RWininger's profile

Ignorant Me

by RWininger
posted 09-20-2012 02:53 PM


21 replies so far

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

6968 posts in 1669 days


#1 posted 09-20-2012 03:06 PM

”...Should I order differently next time or just get a planer and stop crying. I know it’s just my ignorance ….”

I’ve only been at this ~3yr and all I can say is that having a BS, Jointer and Planer saves more than 50% of the cost of wood PLUS it puts you in control of the finished lumber and product.

I guess it just all depends on how much stock you will be going through on a regular basis, and how much equipment you feel comfortable in acquiring. Another alternative is to find a source that you can buy in-person.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View Mainiac Matt 's profile

Mainiac Matt

4497 posts in 1083 days


#2 posted 09-20-2012 03:11 PM

Show a picture so we can see how rough is rough….

If it wasn’t maketed as S4S, I don’t think I’d have expected any better than a thicknessing pass through a heavy duty two sided planer.

Cleaning them up should be a lot of fun.

-- Pine is fine, but Oak's no joke!

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

15822 posts in 2973 days


#3 posted 09-20-2012 03:27 PM

From the description of the lumber, IMO, rough edges would be expected. But when they say “surfaced to 13/16”, to me that means it needs no further planing unless I wanted to change the thickness. I would fully expect it to require further sanding before finishing, but it shouldn’t be “fuzzy”.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View RWininger's profile

RWininger

16 posts in 835 days


#4 posted 09-20-2012 03:28 PM

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

15822 posts in 2973 days


#5 posted 09-20-2012 03:39 PM

Rough lumber:

Surfaced lumber:

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

15822 posts in 2973 days


#6 posted 09-20-2012 03:41 PM

Yes, I would say what you have there is perfectly acceptable for the description given.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View RWininger's profile

RWininger

16 posts in 835 days


#7 posted 09-20-2012 03:56 PM

good to know, now i don’t feel so bad, but realy dont feel like getting a jointer or planer so soon to clean up the wood, just spent $1800 last night on TS & BS.
wanted to make my first box with this wood, but cuped. and not so flat, maybe put on shelf for now,
poor poor me

View Earlextech's profile

Earlextech

1024 posts in 1445 days


#8 posted 09-20-2012 03:58 PM

Yes, that’s what you’ll get when you order “Project Packs”. If you want better you need to cull it out yourself. Any lumberyard worth going to will allow you to do this.

-- Sam Hamory - The project is never finished until its "finished"!

View RWininger's profile

RWininger

16 posts in 835 days


#9 posted 09-20-2012 04:03 PM

need to find a yard that has more than poplar and birch in my area thats ready to go. until i can make another equipment buy.

View Mainiac Matt 's profile

Mainiac Matt

4497 posts in 1083 days


#10 posted 09-20-2012 04:11 PM

I also think you got what you paid for…. to me it looks like some really nice lumber.

Realize that even if the wood were dried per spec. and finished on four sides perfectly flat and square…. within a week of moving it from environment A to environment B, it would move some and require some TLC to correct.

If you’ve broke the bank on TS and BS, then see if you can find someone local to plane the lumber for you. You may be able to use a router and a good straight edge to join the boards.

-- Pine is fine, but Oak's no joke!

View Kookaburra's profile

Kookaburra

748 posts in 979 days


#11 posted 09-20-2012 04:15 PM

And even if the lumbaryard does not display finished pieces of oak, maple, whatever, they will generally finish it for you at a price. Just ask – it can’t hurt! (except your wallet)

-- Kay - Just a girl who loves wood.

View RWininger's profile

RWininger

16 posts in 835 days


#12 posted 09-20-2012 04:18 PM

bank not broke, just my butt from the wife kicking it, need to let things cool down. she just cant understand why all the hobbies are $$$$$$$$$$$$$, she is a great woman, i just always go full tilt on stuff, dont know how to ease into it.

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

15822 posts in 2973 days


#13 posted 09-20-2012 04:36 PM

A few points:

1. I couldn’t really see from the photos that there was cupping. I would retract my “acceptable” if there is much of that.

2. I have ordered 20 bf project packs from Wall Lumber with excellent results (no cupped or twisted boards).

3. You might be surprised how much better you feel about this lumber once you rip and crosscut it to size for your project. When you are used to seeing S4S lumber in the expensive section of Lowes or Home Depot, it’s a bit of a jolt the first time you see S2S straight from the mill. But once you get those rough edges off it starts to look a whole lot better.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View Gshepherd's profile

Gshepherd

1689 posts in 956 days


#14 posted 09-20-2012 05:04 PM

If your taking 4/4 material and expect to get clean 13/16 out of it you will be disappointed most of the time. It will clean up to 3/4 and you should expect it to. If your needing much over 13/16 you best get 5/4 material. If it is in the rough. You can expect it takes at least 1/8” per side to clean up. When I run material through my 6 head moulder I allow at least 1/8” to be taken off all sides to clean up if it is fairly flat clean lumber. It is all SLR 1/4” over size. Even then no guarantee everything will be cleaned up. So called 4/4 is and one would expect 1 inch rough material and it is not. I have had it come in anywhere from .89 to even as high as 1.10 thick. Remind you that is in the rough.

-- What we do in life will Echo through Eternity........

View RWininger's profile

RWininger

16 posts in 835 days


#15 posted 09-20-2012 05:09 PM

i just need to change my mind set on how things are going to be. like i said just so conditioned to seeing that ready to go wood. that will be part of the fun and the journey of each new project i have.

View MrsN's profile

MrsN

943 posts in 2281 days


#16 posted 09-20-2012 05:43 PM

Sometimes those “rough” edges can be really useful in a project. It is an nice way to get a natural look to a piece.
sometimes those parts are left on a board, but weren’t included in the purchase price. They might charge for a 4” wide piece but the piece is 5” wide when you count “rough” part. Not all places are this nice, but some do it.

-- ----- www.KNWoodworking.com ----- --

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

11563 posts in 1445 days


#17 posted 09-21-2012 02:13 AM

I agree with Charlie: the face and edges are quite acceptable, cupped and warped NOT. I have had poor luck buying wood that I didn’t get to inspect first so now get all mine locally or saw my own.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View EPJartisan's profile

EPJartisan

1093 posts in 1880 days


#18 posted 09-23-2012 09:50 PM

Hi, a bit of advice from a guy who made due in basement workshops for the first 5 years… there is a way to do everything without spending much money.. what you need is to be truly motivated and interested in research. the trade off will always be: the amount of work you do vs. the work a machine can do. I ONLY purchase veneers on-line the rest I do in person, but I know not everyone has the luxury I do, to take a day off to drive long distances to climb on drying racks of raw lumber. The boards look great, but take the time to learn the wood you just got. Lots of face grain = meaning it is closer to the sap wood and thus cupping. Lots of fiddle back grain = tension and twists meaning the board will dry be wavy as it acclimates rather than stay flat. Looks like the boards were only roughly planed and squared, and I agree that is the way you’ll get it from a quality lumber source as well.

So use the TS and make yourself some sleds… a fence sled for flattening on the TS (though is only really good for boards up to 6” wide: double the height of the blade), a ripping sled, and a cross cut sled. Struggling = diligence and understanding what is really going on while you work wood.. it is in my opinion the best way to learn through cognitive thinking. Though I own a joiner and a planer… is use the TS and my hand planes far more. (oh but I really HATE my joiner anyway.)

-- " 'Truth' is like a beautiful flower, unique to each plant and to the season it blossoms ... 'Fact' is the root and leaf, allowing the plant grow and bloom again."

View EPJartisan's profile

EPJartisan

1093 posts in 1880 days


#19 posted 09-24-2012 02:24 PM

jointer… I keep writing joiner… I mean jointer. sigh.

-- " 'Truth' is like a beautiful flower, unique to each plant and to the season it blossoms ... 'Fact' is the root and leaf, allowing the plant grow and bloom again."

View killerb's profile

killerb

150 posts in 1153 days


#20 posted 09-27-2012 05:15 PM

I sell figured wood and what I saw in the pictures looked ok. As for warp, it could be flat when it left and then when it got by you, maybe it was humid. Figured wood is always hard to keep flat. A lot of what comes out can be twisted like a pretzel. I just emptied a kiln and had a piece of 8/4 birdseye sitting on the bottom row lift a 5000# pile right up by twisting. The best birdseye comes from some of the ugliest trees. Knotty, narly and twisted. The figure looked real nice in the stock you got. A liitl warp or twist can be taken out when you rough cut the parts to size. Its what I do. Look for a good used jointer. It will help a lot. bob

-- Bob www.bobkloes.com

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

5305 posts in 1332 days


#21 posted 09-27-2012 05:59 PM

FaS all the way. First and Seconds in the grading process.

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