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View Jim Jakosh's profile

Using a Fibonacci Gauge for Wood Turning

by Jim Jakosh
posted 681 days ago


24 replies so far

View SSG's profile

SSG

18 posts in 681 days


#1 posted 681 days ago

I would consider using it to mark where you would cut grooves in somthing like a table leg. You might get away with using it for turning a bowl with and depth maybe?? However the use of math would save you from using the gauge. I’m not a turner and I don’t know a lot about the Fibonacci Gauge.

View Doe's profile

Doe

924 posts in 1428 days


#2 posted 681 days ago

Have you heard about the golden mean? It’s all about proportions – 1 to 1.618 – which most people find pleasing to the eye.

For example, if you use the gauge when making a box, use all three arms for the length of the box and two arms for the width. Looking at your projects, I think you can do it intuitively.

Let me know if you want examples – I’m too pooped to do math tonight.

best regards, Doe

-- Mother Nature talks, I try to listen

View Joe Lyddon's profile

Joe Lyddon

7620 posts in 2650 days


#3 posted 681 days ago

Yes, if oyu want the next Golden Value Higher, multiply by 1.618…
... if you want the next Golden Value Lower, multiply by .618…
Bowl Diameter x .618 = Golden HT. (depth) I would think…

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

View Grumpy's profile

Grumpy

19313 posts in 2449 days


#4 posted 681 days ago

Jim, it is a good measure to think about as long as you have a logic approach. It doesn’t suit all circumstances but can be applied in turning.
I have used it for small turnings like tea-light holders and screw top boxes.

-- Grumpy - "Always look on the bright side of life"- Monty Python

View rance's profile

rance

4125 posts in 1759 days


#5 posted 681 days ago

I mostly use mine like a skew, but can also use it like a parting tool.

-- Backer boards, stop blocks, build oversized, and never buy a hand plane--

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

954 posts in 733 days


#6 posted 681 days ago

If understand rule of thirds or breaking size of elements into thirds Fibonacci gauge works well on most turnings. On large bowls and hollow forms may exceed capability of your gauge unless flip-flop.

You can open or close your gauge on a piece of wood mounted on lathe to show you length, width, and height of an element in relation to other elements. You can measure points of gauge with a ruler and record them in mind or on paper.
Russ explains rule of thirds, with bowl as example. Use your gauge to determine dimensions for your project.

http://www.woodturner-russ.com/Design-2.html

Open gauge, measure & mark where want stuff to be, turn and check with gauge. What no math required?
Other than using a ruler to measure points on gauge and wood guess not.

Do not need the quage to figure thirds, but does make it easier and fun to play with. So just have fun with it.

-- Bill

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

11063 posts in 1704 days


#7 posted 681 days ago

Wow, thanks,Bill. That is exactly what I was looking for. I knew someone would have the answer!!

Thanks again,!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!............. Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View harry1's profile

harry1

512 posts in 883 days


#8 posted 681 days ago

I really can’t see it working for turning, all bowls would look basically the same, just look at your own turnings Jim., each one artistically made to suit the dimensions of the particular blank. For the likes of furniture, buildings etc. it’s magic.

-- Harry, Western Australia

View SSG's profile

SSG

18 posts in 681 days


#9 posted 681 days ago

You can still use a scale for large projects. The Fibonacci gauge is used for design meaning you could have an option of drawing before you build, using measurments to put your ideas to wood.

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

954 posts in 733 days


#10 posted 681 days ago

Rude Osolnik taught about breaking projects into thirds to arrive at a pleasing lines, balance and proportion in everything you turn. While a Fibonacci gauge not necessary will speed thing up on a lot of projects.

It took me longer to download plans and make my Fibonacci gauge than learn how to use it. Fibonacci gauge for more than just bowls. So, whether turning bowls or spindle work; change proportions simply opening and closing your gauge. If making a lot of same items do not change settings.

Marking out major dimensions along length, of spindle turning project provides proportions. Depending upon size of wood and design features checking circumferences may or may not change gauge.

Regardless size of bowl blank can mark off three dimensions bowl body, inside opening, and diameter of base can mark on or off lathe using your gauge.

Taking a gauge to the lathe with wood mounted and little help from pencil & ruler vice checking plans or drawing makes life easier. Give it a shot.

-- Bill

View Roger's profile

Roger

14114 posts in 1402 days


#11 posted 679 days ago

I think it might make a bit o sense, but, I’ve never heard of it being used in turning, to my knowledge. I’m not a super-practicing turner tho. I just turn a little here n there.

-- Roger from KY. Work/Play/Travel Safe. Kentuk55@bellsouth.net

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

954 posts in 733 days


#12 posted 679 days ago

Woodturners that make them, leave hanging on wall or on a shelf in their shop 99.9% of the time. Dummies like me found out will give you great proportion if use it once in awhile. No, do not use it daily but does make me look and feel smarter hanging on peg board in shop.

-- Bill

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

11063 posts in 1704 days


#13 posted 679 days ago

Hi Bill. Mine sits on the desk with the 3 corner square and circle templates and the protractor where I do all my designing. I’m an old fashioned designer- no computer in there I had a vessel planned and wondered if I could use it on that to make it a good looking piece so I asked the question and I like the answer with the rule of thirds for turnings!!.............Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

4747 posts in 1175 days


#14 posted 679 days ago

Thanks for the link Wildwood. I like the explanation and diagrams
of thirds in wood turning, very informative.

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

954 posts in 733 days


#15 posted 679 days ago

Here is a nice article on “Woodturning Design,” by Laura & Barry Uden providing good read.

http://www.westbaywoodturners.com/tutorial/pdf_files/Woodturning_Design.pdf

Of course no mention of a Fibonacci gauge, but do discuss various ratios and formulas for arriving at good design. They do not mention design software, but don’t say not too use it. Can buy a plug in for sketch up which says will help you draw up a plan.

http://www.turnedoutright.com/woodturning-products/modelling-woodturning/

I can spell sketch-up and that is extent of my knowledge on software.

Many woodturners do not worry about golden mean or rule of thirds, elements & principles of design and produce pleasing balanced forms. Too many wrapped around the axle worrying about design and listen to people that just talk about it.

Yes, I like and use rule of thirds on some turnings but not all because, just a mental exercise for me with ruler, dividers, inside, outside calipers and pencil no big deal.

http://www.penturners.org/forum/attachments/f45/33913d1280685233-simple-inside-out-turning-img_1083.jpg

http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f6/derry-hollowing-system-31029/#post256236

Just get yourself organized however your comfortable with whether need detailed plan or design on the lathe with your tools.

-- Bill

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

11063 posts in 1704 days


#16 posted 679 days ago

Thanks again, Bil. Those are some real interesting articles on design!!
Now everyone can reference them, too!!............Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

954 posts in 733 days


#17 posted 677 days ago

I was responding to a post on another message board and came across this book from early 20th century. A fast couple page read (7 thru 11) talking about spindle design form and proportion.

http://books.google.com/books?id=fto5AAAAMAAJ&printsec=frontcover&dq=woodturning+before+1920&source=bl&ots=r2-0qkKsFP&sig=IhGYAia5t-MU3l3hmdSTk-sLzMs&hl=en&sa=X&ei=6YZTUMXADefl0QGa3YHICQ&sqi=2&ved=0CFgQ6AEwBw#v=onepage&q&f=false

He is talking about Fibonacci sequence without mentioning numbers. What he is saying works with any size wood and type of spindle whether want a taper or not.

-- Bill

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

11063 posts in 1704 days


#18 posted 676 days ago

Thanks, Bill. Some real good reading in there!!................Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View Jimbo4's profile

Jimbo4

1121 posts in 1361 days


#19 posted 676 days ago

I just eyeball it. Turnings should be pleasing to the eye, not critically perfect because the eye cannot see to the ‘inth degree of measurement. Haven’t been wrong yet, as I have numerous state fair ribbons to my credit.

-- BELT SANDER: Used for making rectangular gouges in wood.

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

954 posts in 733 days


#20 posted 676 days ago

Rosebudjim, I am not saying using rule of thirds, math or formulas figuring golden mean rectangles or triangles, elements or principals of design will make you a better turner. I do say be aware of these things and different approaches to arriving at pleasing form, shapes & proportion.

Have listen to and read all kinds of arguments from turners advocating using golden mean, golden rectangle and golden triangle. Some of those people explained using simple math and others provided formulas. Very few provide elements or principle of design in their instructions along with that math and those formulas.

-- Bill

View Jimbo4's profile

Jimbo4

1121 posts in 1361 days


#21 posted 673 days ago

Bill – I ignore the math stuff – it hurts the synapses. I do use the rule of thirds, plus pleasing to the eye stuff and, ignore all that math foumula stuff. Works so far. I am presently getting up the nerve to maybe try my hand at some segmented, not using any math formulas. Right now I have a 6” ring of cherry with all the pieces at 45 degrees, and two more waiting be glued together. Haven’t found the “perfect” base yet. Maybe, maybe not ?

-- BELT SANDER: Used for making rectangular gouges in wood.

View mafe's profile

mafe

9453 posts in 1687 days


#22 posted 673 days ago

Interesting stuff here, thank you.
Good question and wonderful answers.
;-)
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

954 posts in 733 days


#23 posted 673 days ago

These index wheels help in laying out and checking alignment of segments before glue up, or can use to glue up on printed index wheel too. Printer & paper size only limiting factor. Not sure worth taking normal 8.5” x 11” printed circle to larger copying machine to make bigger. Nice for working few segments at a time, or forms with lots of segments.

http://www.smithart.us/download.htm

Here is one example:
http://www.smithart.us/downloads/Driskell.pdf

I do not have proper tools for cutting segments/staves most of my output pretty humble so far.

-- Bill

View Jimbo4's profile

Jimbo4

1121 posts in 1361 days


#24 posted 672 days ago

Bill – I have one of them index wheel thingees I got from Capt Eddie, haven’t used it yet. I got a TS sled on sale from Rockler with a free right side cut-off sled. Works real good, not just for segmented stuff.

-- BELT SANDER: Used for making rectangular gouges in wood.

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