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All Replies on Walker Turner 14" Band Saw model Is $ 350.00 too much?

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View HardWoodHead's profile

Walker Turner 14" Band Saw model Is $ 350.00 too much?

by HardWoodHead
posted 08-31-2012 07:47 PM


32 replies so far

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

561 posts in 895 days


#1 posted 08-31-2012 08:51 PM

Doesn’t look like the metal cutting version.. very much looks like the wood cutting version. Perhaps that first digit is a zero instead of a 9? Anyway, metal/wood cutting band saws simply allow you to change the blade speed depending on what you want to cut. It has been my experience that trying to do both causes problems because metal filings don’t really like wood chips and visa-versa, and most people I know that have one dedicate it to a particular task and leave it setup for that alone (ie: dedicated to metal or wood cutting only). That one is setup for a single speed, so changing its speed is a simple matter of just changing out the sheaves (pulleys) for whatever speed you want/need (if it isn’t already the right speed for you).

Here is a link to the 905/935 instruction sheet so you can see the similarities to that machine:
http://vintagemachinery.org/pubs/detail.aspx?id=384

And more manuals and stuff can be found here: http://vintagemachinery.org/mfgindex/detail.aspx?id=808&tab=3

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View JuniorJoiner's profile

JuniorJoiner

449 posts in 2136 days


#2 posted 08-31-2012 08:56 PM

that looks to be the wood cutting saw.I have one and the height is 6 and a half inches high. it is a nice rigid framed little saw.

-- Junior -Quality is never an accident-it is the reward for the effort involved.

View Loren's profile

Loren

7743 posts in 2344 days


#3 posted 08-31-2012 08:59 PM

In order to cut metals a band saw needs a gearbox or a step down
pulley system. This one has no pulley system so either it is a wood
cutting saw or there is a gearbox in the lower wheel bearing housing.

If the gearbox is present you should be able to bypass it by withdrawing
a shot pin and turning a collar (or some similar sort of mechanism)
and then the saw will run at a faster speed.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

1221 posts in 992 days


#4 posted 08-31-2012 10:23 PM

Most band saws of that vintage were converted to metal cutting just by changing the blade and stepping the speed down. They were basically wood machines adapted. Make an offer and use it for wood. If you go over to the Vintage Machinery site (OWWM) you can probably find the manual which tells you what the pulley sizes should be for woodcutting.

View jusfine's profile

jusfine

2280 posts in 1622 days


#5 posted 08-31-2012 11:19 PM

Looks like a wood cutting saw to me too, I would say go for it!

-- Randy "You are judged as much by the questions you ask as the answers you give..."

View Planeman40's profile

Planeman40

486 posts in 1457 days


#6 posted 09-01-2012 01:13 PM

I have that same Walker Turner 14” band saw which I bought way back in about 1960. You can’t get a better bandsaw than this! Solid as a rock, and quiet. Grab it while you can.

Planeman

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

View HardWoodHead's profile

HardWoodHead

34 posts in 2060 days


#7 posted 09-04-2012 04:17 PM

Thank you all for the replies and it sounds like this is may be what I have been holding out for for well over a year. I didn’t get a chance over the weekend to make contact with the seller but plan on doing that today. He wants $ 350.00 for it and I am going to see if he will accept $ 250.00 and go from there. Seems to me that even at $ 350.00 it would be better than a lot of stuff being built today, at least at that price. I guess the only drawback on this Walker Turner is being restricted to the machine’s resaw capability of about 8” if I am correct.

What are you guys doing for a fence for your machine? Is there an “out of the box” one for it or have you guys fashioned you own?

PS MrUnix>>>Thanks for the links on the literature. I think I saw those also at OWWM.

-- Dan Benson---Hitchcock, Texas......Got wood?

View Surfside's profile

Surfside

3301 posts in 869 days


#8 posted 09-04-2012 07:08 PM

I saw manuals for Walker Turner band saw machines here: www.bandsawmanuals.com.

Yes, www.owwm.org is a good source of information for vintage machines like that Walker Turner.

-- "someone has to be wounded for others to be saved, someone has to sacrifice for others to feel happiness, someone has to die so others could live"

View Fishinbo's profile

Fishinbo

11301 posts in 871 days


#9 posted 09-04-2012 09:16 PM

All the links posted are interesting and informative.
I had fun looking at old, big band saws.
Thanks for the share.

View HardWoodHead's profile

HardWoodHead

34 posts in 2060 days


#10 posted 09-04-2012 09:43 PM

Fishinbo: You are welcome. I have a 36” Silver Manufacturing band saw made around 1911 I bought last year but have not set it up yet. I am going to disassemble it and inspect it first. You are probably familiar with the saw and I’ll post a picture of it later. It stands over 8’ tall and is a massive piece of iron similar to the Crescent. About 1,095 pounds I believe.Fishinbo: You are welcome. I have a 36” Silver Manufacturing band saw I bought last year but have not set it up yet. I am going to dissasemble it and inspect it first. You are probably familiar with the saw and I’ll post a picture of it later. It stands over 8’ tall and is a massive piece of iron and similar to the Crescent. About 1,095 pounds I believe. I have friends come by and look at it and say that even if I never ran it it is beautiful just to look at!

-- Dan Benson---Hitchcock, Texas......Got wood?

View HardWoodHead's profile

HardWoodHead

34 posts in 2060 days


#11 posted 09-04-2012 09:44 PM

Ok so the guy still has the saw. Anyone think $ 350.00 is too much to pay for it? Assume of course that it is in running condition. Someone on ebay is asking $ 2,195.00 for a 16” with a fresh paint job. Maybe $ 350.00 for the 14” ain’t bad.

-- Dan Benson---Hitchcock, Texas......Got wood?

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

2210 posts in 2243 days


#12 posted 09-05-2012 01:56 AM

If the funds are available I would buy it fairly quick myself. But I have a greater appreciation for older machines and prefer them over the newer models. I don’t have experience with Walker Turner but no doubt it is a quality machine.

-- Jerry Nettrour, San Antonio, www.topqualitycabinets.net

View Surfside's profile

Surfside

3301 posts in 869 days


#13 posted 09-05-2012 01:16 PM

I agree with Jerry. I don’t have much experience with old machines but they surely are tough!

-- "someone has to be wounded for others to be saved, someone has to sacrifice for others to feel happiness, someone has to die so others could live"

View HardWoodHead's profile

HardWoodHead

34 posts in 2060 days


#14 posted 09-05-2012 01:23 PM

Ok good enought. Thank you Surfside and Jerry. I am either going to pull the trigger on the saw this weekend or hold out and save for a new Grizzly GO555. And if I do get the Walker Turner I will let you guys know. Thanks!

-- Dan Benson---Hitchcock, Texas......Got wood?

View Surfside's profile

Surfside

3301 posts in 869 days


#15 posted 09-05-2012 01:41 PM

Good! I’m looking forward to it!

-- "someone has to be wounded for others to be saved, someone has to sacrifice for others to feel happiness, someone has to die so others could live"

View HardWoodHead's profile

HardWoodHead

34 posts in 2060 days


#16 posted 09-05-2012 08:41 PM

Hey MrUnix Have a look here. It looks like a number 9 at the beginning of the serial number to me. What do you think? Either way I understand from the others that I can use it as a WOOD cutting saw even if it was originally sold and set up for metal.

-- Dan Benson---Hitchcock, Texas......Got wood?

View Surfside's profile

Surfside

3301 posts in 869 days


#17 posted 09-05-2012 08:59 PM

This is an original serial number for the walker turner.

-- "someone has to be wounded for others to be saved, someone has to sacrifice for others to feel happiness, someone has to die so others could live"

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

561 posts in 895 days


#18 posted 09-05-2012 09:32 PM

Actually, the early “serial numbers” were more like model numbers, and that sure does look like a 9! According to the vintagemachinery site serial number list, that is indeed a metal version.. and there are even a couple of pictures in the photo index that show that model with the single sheave like the one you are looking at, such as this one:

Which has the same serial number (model number in this case):

Although the owner of that machine lists it as a wood cutting saw! It really doesn’t matter, wood, metal, both.. all that changes is the speed of the blade, and that can be altered by the correct combination of sheaves on the saw and motor. Nice sturdy machine.. I would take it over pretty much anything being produced today. If you do get it, I suggest you sign up over at owwm and it’s mothership, vintagemachinery. There are a bunch of WT owners over there and can provide you with a wealth of information.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View Surfside's profile

Surfside

3301 posts in 869 days


#19 posted 09-05-2012 09:37 PM

I saw this at www.owwm.org.

-- "someone has to be wounded for others to be saved, someone has to sacrifice for others to feel happiness, someone has to die so others could live"

View HardWoodHead's profile

HardWoodHead

34 posts in 2060 days


#20 posted 09-05-2012 09:56 PM

MrUnix Thanks. Yeah I already joined up over at OWWM. Thanks for the advice. I am definitely a liker of the old iron and the Walker Turner is one heavy mother. Just found a older Rockwell Delta 14” looks like maybe a 28-200 I am going to look at after work here in a few minutes. Probably $ 200.00 for it but as I understand the Walker Turner is fairly hard to find I may have to pay more money and get it. The Rockwell Delta also looks to be a heavy machine and well made. Here is a picture of it but the guy doesn’t know the model so I’ll have to report back tomorrow. Decisions decisions.

-- Dan Benson---Hitchcock, Texas......Got wood?

View Don W's profile

Don W

15278 posts in 1263 days


#21 posted 09-05-2012 10:03 PM

I’ve got a 16” model that’s very similar. http://lumberjocks.com/donwilwol/blog/31577 (just like the one on ebay)

I love mine. I’m not sure how much different they are, but they look pretty much the same.

They are built very well. Mines missing the tilt mechanism, but I plane to make one.(I can order one, but they are $300) I’ve watched prices since I bought mine, and I’ve seen some pretty nasty specimens with an asking price of $350 or more, so the one your looking at is certainly in the ball park.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

561 posts in 895 days


#22 posted 09-05-2012 10:16 PM

Based on the machine badge, that looks like a later model 28-207.. I have an earlier version from 1950 which I got off of craigslist for $85 and dumped another $80 or so into it.. here is a before and after:

These machines have remained virtually unchanged since their inception back in the 1930’s and parts can be found everywhere. Most of the current production asian machines are clones of the Delta and many use the same casting molds. If you get the serial number for the machine, you can write Delta and they can in most cases tell you the exact model number and the month/year that it was made. To add a bit of levity to this discussion, you may notice that the stand on mine is not original.. most likely shop made. The wheels are mounted using a piece of all-thread, which makes it nice to move around. The funny part is the pads on the ‘feet’ opposite the wheels. They are actually the heels cut out of some work boots and bolted to the stand! When I restored the machine, I decided to leave them as is.. felt it was appropriate for the feet to have pads made from boots!

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

2210 posts in 2243 days


#23 posted 09-06-2012 01:17 AM

we will look forward to seeing which bandsaw you choose. I bet that old Rockwell would also be a great bandsaw for you.

You ever go on Amazon and read the reviews on the newer model Delta bandsaws (previously from Lowes), lots of rough reviews for some of these newer model machines. I just do not think the newer machines are as strong as the older ‘made in USA’ machinery. And many times you can get them much cheaper then the newer models.

And nothing against the G0555, which I am sure is a good bandsaw, but there are potentially good savings to be had buying an older heavier machine over the new G0555. And having said that, if you should choose the G0555 I bet you will love that saw as well.

-- Jerry Nettrour, San Antonio, www.topqualitycabinets.net

View HardWoodHead's profile

HardWoodHead

34 posts in 2060 days


#24 posted 09-06-2012 03:02 AM

  • Brad: I saw the machine after work and turns out it is indeed a 28-200. If the raised characters of 03-28-74 on the cast part of the machine represent a date then I guess it is a 1974 model? I can’t find the paper on to which I wrote the serial number but I’ll probably find it by tomorrow which I suppose might reveal a manufacturing date if the 03-28-74 is not. I am not sure if this age machine was early enough to have been built as a 1950 but it looks well built. It currently has a 1/3 hp motor 1725 rpm on a single pulley but the guy had two or three step pulleys to fit the motor shaft which appeared at 1/2”. The unit operated smooth and quiet and seemed to run slow so I am guessing the step pulley could speed it up although I think I would have to immediately ditch the 1/3 hp for no less than a 1 1/2 hp as I would be wanting to add a riser block for resawing.

Jerry: * I agree with you on the newer units of Delta. Also I am about decided that if I buy new I am going to have to get more than a Grizzly G0555 or comparable.

-- Dan Benson---Hitchcock, Texas......Got wood?

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

561 posts in 895 days


#25 posted 09-06-2012 04:38 AM

IIRC, the “heavy duty” motor offered for that saw was 1/2hp! I’ve got a non-original 1/2hp on mine and it is more than adequate for what I use it for and don’t really think that going larger would get me much more in the way of performance. The WT you were looking at has a fixed frame, so a riser isn’t an option on that one.. and while it is on the Delta, if you want to re-saw then you should probably be looking for a larger machine. Yes, you can get 12” of blade exposure with a riser, but you will not get 12” of re-saw, and the tensioning system isn’t really robust enough to handle the tension that large blades will require.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View justinwdemoss's profile

justinwdemoss

146 posts in 1591 days


#26 posted 09-06-2012 01:01 PM

First let me say that I do not know this saw, but from the picture, my first concern would be the resaw height. Most clones of delta/rockwell 14” bandsaws made in the last 40 years use the same basic parts configuration. Buying one of those saws allows you access to all kinds of upgrades and parts. I got my 14 delta/rockwell circa 1971 for $50 two years ago. I am now planning to add the riser blocks to increase the resaw ability. From the picture, it looks like that won’t be an option for your saw. If it were me, $350 seems high. However, its your money and ultimately its whether you can get at least $350 worth of cutting from the saw. Do some checking into replacement parts before you commit.

-- Justin in Loveland, OH

View Surfside's profile

Surfside

3301 posts in 869 days


#27 posted 09-06-2012 01:43 PM

Do not worry about replacement band saw parts. There are a lot of sources online now.
This is where I go for replacement parts:

http://vintagemachinery.org – this is for replacement parts on vintage machineries, mostly for original parts.

http://bandsawparts.com – this is for aftermarket replacement parts on almost all brands.

-- "someone has to be wounded for others to be saved, someone has to sacrifice for others to feel happiness, someone has to die so others could live"

View palaswood's profile

palaswood

814 posts in 447 days


#28 posted 04-11-2014 09:26 PM

So im cleaning up in my garage shop and a white SUV pulls right up to it & the guy inside tells me his daughter is my neighbor, he sees all my wood and asks me if I want a band saw? His father handed it down to him but he doesnt use it now, he’s old etc… I told him its the missing ingredient in my shop and I’m very interested! He tells me he’ll accept any offer I make him, so we agreed on $100 and a turned wooden bowl as payment for this 14” Walker Turner in WONDERFUL condition. Aside from some table rust (came right off with a wire brush and 3m pad), thing is in great condition. This is built like a TANK. After nuclear holocaust, only the cockroaches and the walker turners will remain.


Looks like im gonna get away with just $30 bucks for the woodslicer resaw blade, since tires, bearings, guide blocks etc all seem to be in good working order. I have some Moras Nigra logs that’ll be up on this substantial cast iron table shortly!

-- Joseph, Lake Forest, CA, http://instagram.com/palas_woodcraft#

View bonesbr549's profile

bonesbr549

237 posts in 1763 days


#29 posted 04-12-2014 01:02 AM

Ok, I’ve got that one and I’m restoring it. I paid a hundred for mine without any motor. Something to look at though. There were some potmetal parts that were weak. The table elevation mechanism is notoriously broken on those saws. I think it’s the number one part requested on the old woodworking tool site. (I’m looking for one). The other area is the trunions. They are the second most requested parts. I lucked out and Mine are in great shape. There is a guy that wll make parts and is the guru of WT stuff He quoted me 300 to machine the elevation mechanism. On the good side, you can get the bearings from accurate bearing and they have them all, so you at a minimum will be looking at a bearing replacement, but they are easy to do on this saw. It’s a beast i’ll tell you that. The guy I bought mine off of loaded in the back of my pickup with a bobcat. I had to take it apart to get it off the truck. Good luck.

View Don W's profile

Don W

15278 posts in 1263 days


#30 posted 04-12-2014 11:09 AM

My 16” is missing the tilt mechanism to. I’ve been watching eBay ever since I got mine. I’ve seen one go for almost $400. That’s about what a reproduction goes for. I don’t use it so I haven’t missed it.

making one is on my to-do list unless I luck out and find one before the motivation strikes.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View Planeman40's profile

Planeman40

486 posts in 1457 days


#31 posted 04-12-2014 11:28 PM

I have had a 14” Walker Turner bandsaw from the 1940s for over 50 years and I bought it used even then. Fantastic saw!!! Its only negative is re-saw height. If it were me, I would gladly pay the $350 and run like hell! These things are cast iron monsters and never wear out. In more then a half century of use its as good as it was new.

As for the wood / metal thing, don’t worry. The ONLY difference is the speed of the blade. Just install step pulleys on the motor and bandsaw and you can cut either.

Planeman

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

3365 posts in 703 days


#32 posted 04-12-2014 11:50 PM

WELL? Did you get it or not? :-)

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

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