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View NewEnglandsWoodWorks's profile

HVLP and Shop Spray Booths

by NewEnglandsWoodWorks
posted 08-23-2012 03:30 PM


20 replies so far

View OggieOglethorpe's profile

OggieOglethorpe

904 posts in 835 days


#1 posted 08-24-2012 02:27 AM

What items, and with what materials are you spraying?

I’m in Connecticut. I cover my table saw and outfeed with canvas drop cloths, hang curtains around the perimeter, and install an industrial fan in my door, with a foam insulation plug everywhere the fan isn’t. The curtain line is installed permanently, so the curtains go up in minutes.

I only spray water based lacquer and catalyzed finishes. I spray indoors all year long, as I prefer raking artificial light to natural, not to mention a lack of breezes and control over temperature and humidity.

I would not recommend this setup for flammable finishes without an explosion proof fan, lights, and switches.

I know a guy in Branford who picked up a body shop spray booth for less than 2 grand at an auction. If you’ve got the space and cash, it might be worth looking, especially with wood shops hurting due to a lack of construction.

View NiteWalker's profile

NiteWalker

2710 posts in 1301 days


#2 posted 08-24-2012 04:02 AM

I spray water borne finishes, and small boxes, so I set up a box fan and furnace filter on a stand and point it at a kitchen window. Hardly elegant, but works.
I spray a coat, give the fan 30 seconds to clear the overspray (not much with hvlp) and shut it off and close the window.

-- He who dies with the most tools... dies with the emptiest wallet.

View huff's profile

huff

2808 posts in 2010 days


#3 posted 08-24-2012 04:20 PM

Brett, Since you say you have a large shop, would you have room enough to make a small area for just spraying along an outside wall? You could build a small spray booth. A typical spray ” booth” is three sided with a good exhaust fan with filters. ( lights and fan needs to be explosion proof). In a lot of spray booths; the side walls don’t even go all the way to the ceiling. The problem with an open spray booth is you really can’t do anything else when you’re finishing. If you’re a one man shop, that’s usually not a problem. Since you are using an HVLP system, there shouldn’t be much overspray and having a booth keeps the spray confned and allows the fan to pull more directly from that area. I’ve sprayed for years that way and have had pretty good results. If you’re a production shop, then you should probably invest in a totally enclosed spray room that not only filters the air it exhaust, but also the air it draws in. Can be very expensive, but will keep the EPA and everyone else happy. I’ve used both over the years and since I’m just a one man band, I found a spray “booth” works fine for me.

-- John @ http://www.thehuffordfurnituregroup.com

View NewEnglandsWoodWorks's profile

NewEnglandsWoodWorks

117 posts in 1326 days


#4 posted 08-24-2012 05:21 PM

Whoops, meant to say my shop is’nt very big. Haha. Thanks all for sharing some tips, will try to make something work!
Brett

-- Brett

View Alexandre's profile

Alexandre

1417 posts in 916 days


#5 posted 08-24-2012 05:26 PM

You could also buy one of those dream industrial ones.. :-)
Oh yeah, Fine woodworking or a woodworking magazine has a simple knock together one you could make… PM me for the plans if you want… I think I have it….

-- My terrible signature...

View JesseTutt's profile

JesseTutt

811 posts in 835 days


#6 posted 08-25-2012 07:44 PM

I took a couple of spray finishing classes at the local Woodcraft. They took some craft board (looks like a plastic version of corrugated cardboard) and built a booth that is big enough to spray an end table. They used the motor & impeller section of a dust collector to provide suction. The back end was free. We sprayed various oil based finished all day. No explosion proof devices were used.

In my small woodshop, I have hanging plastic tarps (from Harbor Freight) that I can hang from the rafters. I use a 20” box fan to suck air out the door. Here in Saint Louis I spray September/October through May/June. I want the shop in the low 70s. I also have a dehumidifier. For woodworking I almost exclusively spray lacquer and have not had any problems. I was told that lacquer dries so fast that by the time it gets to the fan it has hardened to dust like particles.

-- Jesse, Saint Louis, Missouri

View Terry Vaughan's profile

Terry Vaughan

36 posts in 881 days


#7 posted 08-25-2012 08:27 PM

I spray water-based paint in a little wooden shed used only for that purpose. I’ve had it freeze on the work in winter, it makes frost patterns like you sometimes see on windows. Quite pretty, but not the effect I wanted, so now I just wait for the thaw or put an electric heater in there.

Terry

View Roswell's profile

Roswell

70 posts in 1043 days


#8 posted 09-06-2012 07:32 PM

I use a one car garage. I built a PVC cube, and cut plastic for it. The blue tape works well to hold it together. I’ve got furnace filters on both ends, and use a box fan to push air in through one filter and out the other. It’s not cemented together, so i can take it down and put it in storage when not needed. Like the others, I don’t spray flamables in there. I have a gas water heater in there, and it could make for a bad, bad day!

-- _Never argue with an idiot. They'll just drag you down to their level and beat you with experience_

View CplSteel's profile

CplSteel

142 posts in 889 days


#9 posted 09-06-2012 07:51 PM

well, I live in a town where the average day time temps in the summer are around 75 and winter is 65 so working outside is never much of an issue. That said, I built a PVC cube with plastic for wind purposes. I got a grommet kit and bolted the plastic to the frame, through the grommets. I have only 3 sides built up, but it wouldn’t be hard to make it bigger, four-sided, and vent it.

View Les 's profile

Les

199 posts in 1415 days


#10 posted 09-14-2012 11:07 AM

Brett,

I went to Walmart a couple years back and found a pop up as many call it. It is 10’ square and I also found a wall kit to go with it. I throw a tarp on the floor, set it up and vent. Pictures enclosed. I think it was just over 100 bucks total.

-- Stay busy....Stay young

View NiteWalker's profile

NiteWalker

2710 posts in 1301 days


#11 posted 09-14-2012 12:04 PM

Les, how are you venting it?
Do you use a fan?

-- He who dies with the most tools... dies with the emptiest wallet.

View Roswell's profile

Roswell

70 posts in 1043 days


#12 posted 09-14-2012 02:02 PM

FWIW, I ran across these inline blowers and wanted to share. From what I read, if they’re USCG approved, they are explosion proof. These are used to vent fumes from engine compartments prior to startup, so I’d think you’d be safe with one. $40 for a 235 cfm explosion-proof blower is a heck of a deal from what I’ve seen. Just please notice that they require a DC power supply.

-- _Never argue with an idiot. They'll just drag you down to their level and beat you with experience_

View Les 's profile

Les

199 posts in 1415 days


#13 posted 09-14-2012 02:20 PM

Yes I use a fan, the pictures above I was using an inline fan that is used in a 6” trunk line to boast flow. I have since changed to a squirrel cage fan. Keep in mind I use all water based product so I don’t have the explosion problem.

-- Stay busy....Stay young

View Roswell's profile

Roswell

70 posts in 1043 days


#14 posted 09-14-2012 02:27 PM

Les, any idea how many cfm the squirrel cage is, and whether it’s enough to suit?

Thanks,

Roswell

-- _Never argue with an idiot. They'll just drag you down to their level and beat you with experience_

View Mainiac Matt 's profile

Mainiac Matt

4351 posts in 1053 days


#15 posted 09-14-2012 04:31 PM

cardboard and duct tape are your friends

-- Pine is fine, but Oak's no joke!

View Les 's profile

Les

199 posts in 1415 days


#16 posted 09-15-2012 12:22 PM

Rosewell,

I have looked everywhere and can’t find the CFM on my unit. It is a Lasko model 4914. It does a good job for me. I just dropped it into a cardboard box, cut a hole for the discharge, and cut a 6” hole in the top and installed a 6” round vent pipe in the top. I open a window and set it in it. Connect a flex pipe and I am good to go.

Les

-- Stay busy....Stay young

View Roswell's profile

Roswell

70 posts in 1043 days


#17 posted 09-15-2012 02:41 PM

-many thanks Les, that’s a great idea I had not thought of.

-- _Never argue with an idiot. They'll just drag you down to their level and beat you with experience_

View OggieOglethorpe's profile

OggieOglethorpe

904 posts in 835 days


#18 posted 10-06-2012 01:58 AM

With some slight modifications to accomodate an exhaust fan, the EZ-Up idea is a fantastic solution!

View Les 's profile

Les

199 posts in 1415 days


#19 posted 10-06-2012 11:35 AM

Glad the EZ-up worked out for you, how about some pictures or your modifications? I am always looking for a better way.

Thanks
Les

-- Stay busy....Stay young

View OggieOglethorpe's profile

OggieOglethorpe

904 posts in 835 days


#20 posted 10-06-2012 12:30 PM

When I do it, I’ll be happy to share.

This is a great time for me to try this idea, as all the odd lot stores have canopys on blowout sale.

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