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View AngieO's profile

What do you think about this dado set?

by AngieO
posted 739 days ago


45 replies so far

View AngieO's profile

AngieO

1138 posts in 774 days


#1 posted 739 days ago

Oh… and something to just throw in there… I have a Lowe’s merchandise card (still). Not enough on there to buy any big tools, and I don’t really want to buy any lumber from them… so this was paid for with that card. The card was given to me free. (that’s a whole other story for another time)

View sonnyr's profile

sonnyr

89 posts in 755 days


#2 posted 739 days ago

I purchased an inexpensive dado set one time and found out that the blades were not the same size in diameter. You might want to check that out. At $19 you really got a good deal. As far as I know an 8” set is the norm.

-- I may be slow, but I'm easy to stop!!!

View Alongiron's profile

Alongiron

402 posts in 1320 days


#3 posted 739 days ago

8” dado sets are the norm. You will have to check the length of your arbor (the threaded rod that holds your blade in place) to see if it is long enough to accept that 13/16” width along with a washer and nut. This brand does cut a flat bottom which is good. Be careful when cutting cross grains with less expensive blades as you could get alot of chip out, especially on plywood. I think that for the money, it will give you the opportunity to learn from it and how they work. You will also need to purchase a different insert for your tablesaw because must openings are only about 1/2” to except only up to a 3/8” dado blade width. Good luck and a good buy!

-- Measure twice and cut once.....

View crank49's profile

crank49

3371 posts in 1598 days


#4 posted 739 days ago

Be sure that your saw can handle a dado blade. Many of those direct drive saws can’t.
If you don’t have a manual, you might be able to find one online.
If you can’t find out for sure about the saw’s capacity, at least be sure the arbor is long enough that the saw stack can fit with the arbor washers and the nut and still have some threads left sticking out past the nut. This is very important.

The 8” size dado is OK, but if you saw is a little under powered, you can even use a 6” dado. Since a dado is not normally a through cut, they don’t have to be as large as the 10” blade. A 6” blade can still cut over an inch deep dado and that’s more than enough, usually, and takes less horsepower to run.

I know some of the benchtop saws, like the Porter Cable for instance, only allow 6” dado blades and only 1/2” wide.

I must confess, I have an 8” dado set and my saw is designed to handle it, but I find that it’s more trouble to change out the blades, change out the insert, than to just make several passes with the regular blade. Some day, if I get a second saw, I may keep one set up with a dado, but till then I just make multiple passes with the regular blade. That could change depending on what I’m working on of course.

-- Michael :-{| “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” ― A H

View Don W's profile

Don W

14842 posts in 1194 days


#5 posted 739 days ago

At $19 it was probably worth it. 13/16” is the typical size of 3/4” plywood. For 3/4” lumber you’ll need to improvise. Its probably not going to be one of the smoothest cuts either, but its a starter set.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View ShaneA's profile

ShaneA

5286 posts in 1225 days


#6 posted 739 days ago

My 1st dado set was a mibro, $50 from lowes. It came in the same box, but the blades and chippers look different than yours. It was ok on hardwood and w/the grain on ply, but seem to chip too much on ply crosscuts. I have since upgraded, but still have that one. With a direct drive saw, you will need to take small bites and multiple passes.

View Howie's profile

Howie

2656 posts in 1550 days


#7 posted 739 days ago

My first dado set was an 8” mibro from Lowes. Got it cheap . Worked fine.
When I bought a new one it was a ….6” Oshlun. Works fine for no more than I use it.I just couldn’t justify spending 200 bucks on something I use once or twice a year.
For 19 bucks I would have bought it
What kind of saw do you have? Like someone else pointed out you need to change the insert. You can make your own.
Remember you don’t have to use all the blades. You can set up a 3/8 inch and make two passes etc.
I think you did all right.

-- Life is good.

View cutworm's profile

cutworm

1064 posts in 1420 days


#8 posted 739 days ago

Lowest has CMT dados on clearance as well. $39 here.

-- Steve - "Never Give Up"

View thedude50's profile

thedude50

3511 posts in 1105 days


#9 posted 739 days ago

the cmt set I own is not the same one they sell at lowes. I did check it out they are way different. I know cmt made an economy dado set that is supposed to retail for 99 dollars, that is the one lowes sells. at 39 dollars I would buy that one the 19 dollar blade I would not trust IMHO

-- when I am not on Lumberjocks I am on @ http://thisoldworkshop.com where we allow free speech

View boxcarmarty's profile

boxcarmarty

9128 posts in 987 days


#10 posted 739 days ago

$19 is a great price. Even if it’s a cheap set and doesn’t last as long as a more quality set, It is well worth the price to play with and learn from. You might even consider grabbing another set at that price. 8” is the normal size on a dado set. You don’t need the depth that you would normally have with a 10” cutting blade. The 2 shims with the print on them are shims that goes between your cutters and your chippers. The other shims, and yes they are of different thicknesses, are for fine tuning the width of your dado.

-- My mind is like lighting, one brilliant flash, then its gone.....

View Moron's profile

Moron

4666 posts in 2520 days


#11 posted 739 days ago

Throw the dice, who knows, could be a steal of deal or it could be your worst nightmare if it turns into a cross between a Gatling gun and a grenade.

The diameter wont really matter as not too many folks run a 3” deep dado, they are generally about 1/8” through 1/2” and a small dia., can be advantageous as you can sneak up closer to a stopped dado.

If nothing else, the spacers can work on another set, and at least you will have those.

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

View derosa's profile

derosa

1533 posts in 1462 days


#12 posted 739 days ago

I find that set annoying for determining which shim to use, as to quality of cut mine wasn’t bad and I used it a lot. Still have it but at this point it needs to be cleaned and sharpened. I think I paid around the 50.00 price point and I’ve had mine about 3 years. Well worth the price you paid.

-- --Rev. Russ in NY-- A posse ad esse

View NiteWalker's profile

NiteWalker

2709 posts in 1203 days


#13 posted 739 days ago

You did good for the price. :)
The case is nice.

-- He who dies with the most tools... dies with the emptiest wallet.

View lumberjoe's profile

lumberjoe

2829 posts in 875 days


#14 posted 739 days ago

I’d be REALLY apprehensive on putting a full 8” stack on a direct drive bench top table saw. Do some research before you start spinning these things. Also, as with a router, multiple light cuts are much better (and safer) than hogging out the entire dado in one shot

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts

View AngieO's profile

AngieO

1138 posts in 774 days


#15 posted 739 days ago

lumberjoe… that’s a good point you brought up. I was cutting some half-laps on my router on Saturday. I’m not very patient but I forced myself to take it slow and take several passes instead of digging in. What’s a good amount to take off at a time?

I hear you guys saying that I should make sure my TS will allow this dado set… How do I find that out? Will the manual say this? I have had some issues getting the manual. The searches I get back keep giving me the manual for a different model. My little benchtop TS is a Craftsman 137.248760 and is only 2.5 HP. Anyone had any dealings with that model?

I read Chickenfoots blog the other day where he started out with $20 and ended up with a beautiful Delta UniSaw. Well… LOL… I obviously don’t know enough about tools or have the resources to do that… So I guess I should set my sights a little lower. But I can already tell that a new table saw will be in my future.

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

5418 posts in 2002 days


#16 posted 739 days ago

I suspect that this is one of those cases where you get what you pay for. It’ll cut dados, but I wouldn’t expect very good performance for very long. I can’t help but wonder if you’d be better off saving up your money and getting a better set.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View lumberjoe's profile

lumberjoe

2829 posts in 875 days


#17 posted 739 days ago

1 – That TS is NOWHERE NEAR 2.5 hp. That is probably one of those “max developed” made up numbers. At best you are looking at 1.5 to 1.75 hp.

2 – A direct drive saw is just that. The motor shaft spins the arbor directly. As you can tell from the box, a full 8” dado stack is pretty heavy.

3 – If you are not patient, you have chosen the wrong hobby. Rushing will ruin your projects, and could actually harm you. Had you forced that router bit it could have snapped off. Carbide spinning at 23,000 is not a good thing, especially coming at you. I generally don’t take off more than 1/8” at a time with most bits. Some of the larger spiral or straight bits I may push a bit harder depending on the material. If your router bits are 1/4” shaft, your 1/8” depth should be a hard maximum.

And yes, the manual will tell you what type of dado that saw will accept. As far as a new table saw, set your sights at 500$ and grab the Ridgid R4512. I personally believe that is the best saw you can get for under 600$ – new or used.

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts

View AngieO's profile

AngieO

1138 posts in 774 days


#18 posted 739 days ago

Thanks lumberjoe. That helps.

No… patience in not my strong suit at all. BUT…I’ve forced myself to be because I definitely have a healthy fear of getting hurt. I probably was spot on about 1/8” when I was routing that piece. My fear of tearing the wood, breaking or dulling the bit and most importantly, getting hurt… kept me from doing much more than that. I’m a big baby so taking longer to do something is much better than pain.

I think at this point that maybe I’d be better off just returning that dado set. I can handle using the router for a while and doing what crank49 said. That’s $20 I could just save up to get something bigger. Looks like I’m going to need a new ROS anyways. Mine died on me.

View lumberjoe's profile

lumberjoe

2829 posts in 875 days


#19 posted 739 days ago

I am in the minority here, but I STILL prefer doing dados with a router. I have a nice dado set, I even made a dado sled and fence for my table saw, but I can’t break the old habit of using one of the routers.

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts

View AngieO's profile

AngieO

1138 posts in 774 days


#20 posted 739 days ago

I don’t know… it seems like unless you have a dedicated saw for just doing dados that it would be too much of a pain to have to change the blades. Do your dado. Then change it back if you have other need for the saw. Sure, it takes some time to get to the depth when you are doing an 1/8” at a time… but changing the bit on my router is quick and easy, unlike changing the TS blade.
And until I get a better saw… I think I’ll just stick to the router anyways.

View lumberjoe's profile

lumberjoe

2829 posts in 875 days


#21 posted 739 days ago

I have almost 25 saw blades (23 to be exact, I know it’s a problem and I need help) and change blades and throat plates many times during a project. That is not my limiting factor. I find I have more control with a router and have a very good system/technique down. When I had a small direct drive table saw, I wouldn’t dare put a dado stack on it so I had to make do. Using a plunge router with an edge guide or a fence, multiple passes at different depths are really easy and don’t take much time at all. A router also cuts so much cleaner (with the right bit) in my experience anyway. I do like using a dado stack to cut tenons though.

Also to address something else you said, fear should never be a motivating factor for safety. Fear leads to as many or more mistakes than inexperience or carelessness does. Fear invokes the “close your eyes, grit your teeth and hope for the best” mentality. You should be confident and completely understand the risks of what you are about to do. There are a lot of times, especially on the table saw, that I second guess my cuts. I’ll notice a small knot that may get tossed back at me and flip the piece over to avoid it. Or there may be a spot where a large know was forming that I know will be under a lot of stress and pose a kickback hazard, so I will try to avoid cutting through that as well.

Don’t be afraid of your tools. Have a healthy respect for them. Understand what can go wrong, and what you are going to do WHEN something goes wrong. I highlighted when because at some point, it will. Being prepared to back out of the cut, shut the saw off and get the hell out of the way, pull the router back, shut it off and let the bit spin down in the cut, etc. Equate it to riding a motorcycle. Those who think they will never fall get killed. Those who understand when to let go instead of high siding or straightening out into a tank slapper get to test out their safety gear and live another day.

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts

View HerbC's profile

HerbC

1161 posts in 1486 days


#22 posted 739 days ago

AngieO,

Just in case nobody told you, that’s a good buy on the Milbro Dado Blade Set.

I have a set just like it that I paid $50 for a couple of years ago. The have been servicable but you should be careful not to take heavy cuts with the set.

Have Fun!

Be Careful!

Herb

-- Herb, Florida - Here's why I close most messages with "Be Careful!" http://lumberjocks.com/HerbC/blog/17090

View Rick  Dennington's profile

Rick Dennington

3314 posts in 1821 days


#23 posted 739 days ago

That’s a good starter set for the dados….but like was said, you really need a bigger saw…I don’t think I would try to turn the dado set on the saw you have…...it’s too small, and not enough power…..

-- " I started with nothing, and I've still got most of it left".......

View Tomj's profile

Tomj

204 posts in 1008 days


#24 posted 739 days ago

AngieO try this link it should bring you to a page where you can download the manual
http://www.imarksweb.net/book/craftsman+10+model+137+248760/
Good luck.

View mmlaing's profile

mmlaing

14 posts in 1934 days


#25 posted 738 days ago

my cmt dado set is about 15 years old I believe it was about $300 CDN at the time, it is an 8” set and it does cut wonderful dados. I had a cheaper set that worked well on soft woods but not so great on hardwood. like anything, you get what you pay for . an expensive blade for an economy table saw is an upgrade however the reverse is not true.

enjoy your machines, like the rest of us, you will eventually put most of your disposable income into tools and the
quality will become apparent.

Mike

View MonteCristo's profile

MonteCristo

2094 posts in 815 days


#26 posted 738 days ago

If your TS is running on a normal 110V house circuit, it’s not really 2.5HP They just say that for marketing. In fact it is likely barely 1 HP when it’s actually working. With underpowered saws you should go fairly slowly and listen to how the motor sounds – it it starts to slow down/struggle, take it a bit easier.

If you think changing blades on a TS is a hassle, don’t buy a bandsaw ! It’s way more of a pain and time burner.

IMO, any dado set worth $19 (I think is was) is junk. Sure, it can be used for carpentry, but it will likely work poorly, especially on crosscut dados. There are tons of cheap carbide blades out there and some are amazingly good for the money, but it’s still pretty much the case that if you want a good blade, you need to pay something nearer the upper end of the price range.

-- Dwight - "Free legal advice available - contact Dewey, Cheetam & Howe""

View AngieO's profile

AngieO

1138 posts in 774 days


#27 posted 738 days ago

It seems as though I’ve got a good mix of opinion on here. What I’ve taken away from here is that this set is probably not a bad set. And they retail normally for $50+ and I just was able to get them for $19 because they are on clearance and getting rid of them. So they probably aren’t a bad set to start out with and learn from. However… my TS is a little one and not very powerful. I could keep the set and not use them until I get a better TS.

But…. in the end I think I will return them and get something else. I could always use more clamps :) And I think they have a good sale going on.

View AngieO's profile

AngieO

1138 posts in 774 days


#28 posted 738 days ago

Oh… and I like the dado jig that I saw on The Wood Whisperer. Just need the hardware. I do actually have two routers. One that I have on my router table that is fixed base. And then I have a plunge router as well.

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

5418 posts in 2002 days


#29 posted 738 days ago

What I’ve taken away from here is that this set is probably not a bad set.

That really depends on how define ”not bad ”. On the plus side, it’s a dado set, it’s got carbide teeth, it didn’t cost alot, and it’s got a nice case. Just about any set with steel teeth would be worse, but beyond that, there probably aren’t many modern carbide dado sets that don’t have a leg up on this one….I’d consider it a bottom dweller (go ahead, call me a ”BUZZZ” killer! ...LOL). My opinion is that you’d be better off with a 6” set that’s higher quality. A 6” set is easier for your saw to spin. Avenger (same as Oshlun AFAIK) makes a pretty decent 6” dado set for ~ 50 shipped ….it’s definitely more money than the Mibro, but it’s a good set that your saw should handle better, will cut better, and will last a lot longer.

It’s your money, and you ultimately get to choose. I’d pick up a ROS with your Lowes card, and would get the Avenger set.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View TheOldTimer's profile

TheOldTimer

222 posts in 1713 days


#30 posted 738 days ago

Went to two Lowes here in Phoenix area and can not find any CMT dado sets at all. No one in the store knows about the CMT $39.00 price at all. Don’t know where they are selling them but apparently not here in the SW.

-- TheOldTimer,Chandler Arizona

View b2rtch's profile

b2rtch

4310 posts in 1675 days


#31 posted 738 days ago

I have a mibro set bought an Amazon, it’s OK not great ,not any better than my HF.

-- Bert

View Tennessee's profile

Tennessee

1447 posts in 1141 days


#32 posted 738 days ago

In the South it seems like the CMT dado sets are going (gone) for a higher price. When I went in to my two local Lowes to see if they had any remaining CMT blades, they both had the Mibro and CMT dado sets on sale, $19 for the Mibro, $53 for the CMT. I bought the CMT and will use it in my Rigid R4512, which I now believe is the best saw buy out there for under $500, bar none, maybe even better than the Grizzly Hybrid. (And with my Military discount, snagged it for $450.)

-- Paul, Tennessee, http://www.tsunamiguitars.com

View RickLoDico's profile

RickLoDico

55 posts in 1688 days


#33 posted 738 days ago

I would take it back and get the CMT. I got mine at Lowes for 25.00. I ordered it online and picked it up at a local store. My second saw is a Bosch table top and I use it just for dados. It will handle an 8” set and will cut a 3/4 dado 3/8 deep with ease.

-- He who fights with monsters might take care lest he thereby become a monster. And if you gaze for long into an abyss, the abyss gazes also into you.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112011 posts in 2204 days


#34 posted 738 days ago

Hi Angie
If your table saw is a direct drive chances are it will not accept a dado blade because the arbor is to short plus the fact that a dado blade with all it’s mass places a lot of force on a little saw. If your saw is not direct drive chances are it will accept a dado unless it’s a very old saw that has a smaller than 5/8” arbor,but even then there are some old 6” dado blades that will fit on those saws. I think you need one of these to contend with the rainy whether. http://www.walmart.com/ip/Caravan-Canopy-reg-Magnum-Pro-Residential-Canopy-Kit/20894335
:))

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

2790 posts in 1870 days


#35 posted 738 days ago

Quote “I hear you guys saying that I should make sure my TS will allow this dado set… How do I find that out? Will the manual say this? I have had some issues getting the manual. The searches I get back keep giving me the manual for a different model. My little benchtop TS is a Craftsman 137.248760 and is only 2.5 HP. Anyone had any dealings with that model?”

Easy. Just see if the arbor is long enough to accomodate 13/16” for the dado plus the height of the nut and the thickness of any washers. I don’t know about the Mibro dado, but most sets will have an inner and an outer blade plus the chippers. It is important to set the dado so the set of the teeth face AWAY from each other and the chippers teeth are positioned within the gullet area of the blades. This is important to set the width correctly. You don’t want a chipper tooth touching an outer blade. You will have to take test cuts and add or remove shims to arrive at the correct width. $19 sound like a great deal. If I didn’t already have 3 sets, I would go buy one. LOL

BTW; I have a bottom-of-the-line dado set sold by Harbor Freight. Works fine for my purpose and cost about the same. Doesn’t cut as clean as a Forrest $200 set, but with a little extra work, it does an acceptable job.

View Don W's profile

Don W

14842 posts in 1194 days


#36 posted 738 days ago

yep, put it on the saw and make sure you have enough threads for a full nut. (or darn close)

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View AngieO's profile

AngieO

1138 posts in 774 days


#37 posted 738 days ago

a1Jim… I think that is a great idea!

I took them back. I’m going to get a new ROS instead. Right now I need a sander. I don’t “need” a dado set. And… I’m going to use my router to do dado’s until I get a good saw. I’ve heard a couple of times now about the Rigid saw being the best for under $500. May have to look into that.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112011 posts in 2204 days


#38 posted 738 days ago

I think that might work out better for you Angie. I have eight R O S and my Favorite is this one
http://www.toolking.com/milwaukee-6021-81-factory-reconditioned-5-inch-random-orbit-palm-sander/
I also have a number of students of mine who have bought the Ridgid table saw and love theirs

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Alexandre's profile

Alexandre

1417 posts in 818 days


#39 posted 737 days ago

Porter cable 390k to me is the best sander…
No brushes, and it’s one powerful at beast at 3.5 amps compared to the average 3

-- My terrible signature...

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112011 posts in 2204 days


#40 posted 737 days ago

I have a 390 PC, I like the Milwaukee better it’s lighter, easier to grip and can do aggressive sanding and even though the PC has a new style motor , I’ve had even cheep ryobi ’s ROS’s for 20 years with out motor problems. IMO you really don’t know if you like a ROS unless you have used it for a while that’s why I have 7 Ros’s . We all have our likes and dislikes as far as tools go.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Alexandre's profile

Alexandre

1417 posts in 818 days


#41 posted 737 days ago

Yup, I tried the Milwaukee at a show… Its not a bad machine, except its near impossible to find in canada.

-- My terrible signature...

View lumberjoe's profile

lumberjoe

2829 posts in 875 days


#42 posted 737 days ago

The Milwaukee is awesome. I also have several ROS’s and that is my go-to. I believe FWW or someone similar rated it right behind the Fe$tool in a ROS comparison.

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts

View AngieO's profile

AngieO

1138 posts in 774 days


#43 posted 737 days ago

The one I had was a Black & Decker. Wasn’t overly impressed with it. But… I liked it better than the other sander that my husband has. I cant stand it. I don’t know what it’s called. Maybe a sheet sander. Has the squares. I couldn’t stand it. So when I first used the little B&D that I had… I loved it.

Since I have $$ on my Lowe’s card I think I will get one from there. My choices are Dewalt, Porter Cable, Bosch and Skil. I originally thought about getting the Skil because I was thinking that I would eventually upgrade anyways and didn’t want to spend a lot of money yet. After hearing about you guys have multiple ones you’be tried makes me think that I will undoubtedly end up buying more. BUT… I know this is something that I’m going to use on every project. So I want to get something that’s going to be good. I may go with the Porter Cable. I keep hearing it’s pretty good.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112011 posts in 2204 days


#44 posted 737 days ago

I had the same awakening years ago when I bought my first REO it was Ryobi , compared to the ones I use now it was terrible but it was far far better than a pad sander. Since I’m an expert on buying ROS I found were not right for me may suggest you at least plug the one in your considering and hold it as if you were going to sand, I bought all of my ROS on line and wished I hadn’t. I had read some reviews and one said how great the 390k ,but other reviews said it was uncomfortable to hold for people even with large hands and all but impossible for people with small hands ,of course I thought that wouldn’t bother me but after using it for a while I found myself using the ROS with the more comfortable handles. Every ones different and others may love the 390k . I would suggest you check the return policy on what ever you buy and stay away from the low end sanders like Ryobi and Skil. Good luck on what ever you buy.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View AngieO's profile

AngieO

1138 posts in 774 days


#45 posted 737 days ago

Good point. I have very small hands. So getting something that’s big and awkward just wouldn’t make since.

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