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View riooso's profile

Could someone help me with a decision of a carbide bandsaw blade?

by riooso
posted 767 days ago


22 replies so far

View HillbillyShooter's profile

HillbillyShooter

4340 posts in 887 days


#1 posted 767 days ago

My recommendation is to go with the Lennox Tri-Master. I purchased one from Highland Hardware and it sure makes as much difference as going from regular to carbide blades on the TS or router. I’m not seeing good things about Laguna lately and would stay away for that reason. Just search Laguna under Forums for an idea of other LJ’s experiences.

-- John C. -- "Firearms are second only to the Constitution in importance; they are the peoples' liberty's teeth." George Washington

View AHuxley's profile

AHuxley

208 posts in 1917 days


#2 posted 767 days ago

The RK has a thinner kerf and thinner gauge than the Trimaster. I have more than 4 of each and particularly for veneer my go to blade is the RK, the thin kerf and superior finish just make it the best veneer blade. The Trimaster can be resharpened but there are a limited number of resharpeners that can do it well. Others have found these but in the past I haven’t had good luck, there are a couple of resharpeners I plan to try. The RKs always come back to me as good as they were initially.

View jusfine's profile

jusfine

2280 posts in 1521 days


#3 posted 767 days ago

I have had a Lenox carbide on my General bandsaw for years, cuts like a charm.

I also have a resaw king on my Laguna which works fine too. No complaints against either, but have had the Lenox longer.

Since the Laguna is a larger and more powerful saw, I probably have used Resaw King on more exotics with no issues.

-- Randy "You are judged as much by the questions you ask as the answers you give..."

View riooso's profile

riooso

38 posts in 1241 days


#4 posted 767 days ago

Thanks for the input. One more question if I may. Who can do the resharpening on the carbide bandsaw blades? I have been using a local guy for my circular blades and he is outstanding.

Thanks,
Richard

View Loren's profile

Loren

7222 posts in 2243 days


#5 posted 767 days ago

Any saw shop should be able to resharpen a carbide tipped
bandsaw blade. They aren’t so heavy you can’t mail them
out if you want re-tipping or whatever.

I’m not so optimistic about a carbide tipped resaw blade
performing well in a width under 1”. Blades do tend to
wander if the gullets aren’t big enough and bigger
gullets is one of the benefits of a wider blade.

The wider the stock you insist on sawing, the trickier
resawing gets with mid-market saws. I recommend
ripping to 6” or less if possible, then resawing. For some
types of work this isn’t the right method, but for
furniture it is often acceptable and eliminates some
of the headaches of resawing wide boards.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View jusfine's profile

jusfine

2280 posts in 1521 days


#6 posted 767 days ago

Richard, your local sharpener should be able to do it.

I have had mine for quite a few years, have not sharpened it yet!

-- Randy "You are judged as much by the questions you ask as the answers you give..."

View SCOTSMAN's profile

SCOTSMAN

5241 posts in 2180 days


#7 posted 767 days ago

I was told by my blade supplier that normal bandsaws travel too slowly for carbide blades he refused to sell me one saying it would be a waste of my money, was he wrong then .?I would really like to know. Alistair

-- excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

View AHuxley's profile

AHuxley

208 posts in 1917 days


#8 posted 767 days ago

Do be so sure about any sawshop being able to do a good job on carbide bandsaw blades… they don’t use the same machines used for circular saw blades.

The 3/4” Trimaster doesn’t exhibit any “bad traits” when resawing as long as the tension is correct. A wider blade would be nice but I wouldn’t use wider than a 3/4” on the Rikon, I won’t use a TM wider than 1” on my Minimax due to tensioning. The RK you could go up to 1” since it has a thinner gauge backer, the thin kerf is better wood savings and uses less hp.

View AHuxley's profile

AHuxley

208 posts in 1917 days


#9 posted 767 days ago

@ SCOTSMAN In general he is incorrect there is nothing about carbide blades that require higher speeds, though many “hobby” saws run well below optimum speed but it doesn’t perevent the use of carbide blades in any way. The real issue is can a particular saw tension the blade high enough (both the blades in question like 28,000-30,000 PSI) AND has wheels large enough to not cause metal fatigue in the band. In the end for many people bi-metal blades offer some of the benefits of carbide without the high buy-in price. The non-set and ground teeth of a carbide blade will in general leave a better finish than most non-carbide blades though.

View Loren's profile

Loren

7222 posts in 2243 days


#10 posted 767 days ago

@SCOTSMAN – he may not understand woodcutting applications
for carbide tipped bandsaw blades. He may be thinking in
metal cutting terms.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View riooso's profile

riooso

38 posts in 1241 days


#11 posted 766 days ago

Thanks for all the information. Once again, great help.

Thanks;
Richard

View MonteCristo's profile

MonteCristo

2094 posts in 784 days


#12 posted 766 days ago

I have a lot of Lenox blades, partly because I stumbled on spectrumsupply.com where they cut the price the more you buy. They seem good. I had a TRIMASTER but I think the WOODMASTER is likely better if you are only cutting wood as the TRIMASTER is for soft metals (aluminum) and other non wood materials as well as wood. It makes sense that the WOODMASTER would be better just for wood.

Lenox got a bad repuitation for bands breaking for awhile but I think they are past that and I have had no troubles.

I have an Iturra Designs tension meter and have found that none of my three bandsaws (Delta 14”, General 20”, LT24 24”) come anywhere near the 30,000 PSI Lenox and others recommend, even with improved tension springs in them. I think the tension thing is overstated. A good sharp blade will cut well even at lower tensions. Michael Fortune is a well known cabinet maker who advocates this and I think there is something to it.

-- Dwight - "Free legal advice available - contact Dewey, Cheetam & Howe""

View AHuxley's profile

AHuxley

208 posts in 1917 days


#13 posted 765 days ago

The Woodmaster CT is a good blade but it has two things going against it, one it does not leave as nice of a finish (especially hand fed) as the Trimaster and certainly not the RK AND it the smallest one is 1” x .035” which is not a good candidate for a smaller saw, my MM20 can tension it correctly BUT just barely.

The Iturra tension meter is known for not being particularly repeatable which is an issue for most of the tension gauges even my Starrett since they are really designed to read much higher tensions for metal work.

Tension is important and proper tension lets one get the most out of a blade. Lower then optimum tension will allow harmonic vibrations to have higher amplitudes thus reducing the quality of the finish. Low tension also increases the tendency to barrel in the cut plus a host of other issues. Some blades respond to lower than optimum tension better than others, as a general rule carbide blades tens to respond the worst. The best thing to do is find a blade with a cross section that is condusive to proper tension on a particular saw, in the case of resaw blades reducing the width to obtain proper tension will gain you more than the loss of a 1/4” of width. This is again one area the Resaw King excels given it has a very thin gauge compared to the Lenox blades.

@ MonteCristo where did you get your uprated spring for the LT24?

View riooso's profile

riooso

38 posts in 1241 days


#14 posted 764 days ago

Thanks for the post AHuxley. Which leads me to the question what size blade should I be looking at. The Ricon that I have is the Rikon 2-1/2 HP, 18” Bandsaw, (10-345). I took a class a while back and the instructor mentioned 3/8” was fine as long as you had the blade tight enough. We were using a 14” bandsaw so the assumption I made is that a blade that size was all the 14” could handle. He was a big believer in that approach but I have not seen him since to ask him about it.

Thanks,
Richard

View Loren's profile

Loren

7222 posts in 2243 days


#15 posted 764 days ago

Go bigger in terms of wheel diameter and go wider in terms
of blade width whenever possible. My opinion is if you want
to do a lot of resawing get a big flat-wheel saw and run as wide
a blade on it as you can.

Narrow blades will cut straight when they are fresh but they
dull quickly and start to lead and cut bellies in the boards. Wider
blades have more beam strength front to back and resist
following the grain better as they get dull.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View riooso's profile

riooso

38 posts in 1241 days


#16 posted 764 days ago

Thanks boxos

View Gerald Thompson's profile

Gerald Thompson

339 posts in 830 days


#17 posted 763 days ago

Take a look @ this http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wGbZqWac0jU&list=FLYDEiGLzvqQNIl-nqvD2OOQ&feature=mh_lolzs.

When you get done with that I will send you an URL about saw blades.
The URL is by a fellow that works for Carter Products but it is not an infomertial

-- Jerry

View AHuxley's profile

AHuxley

208 posts in 1917 days


#18 posted 763 days ago

@riooso to determine the maximum blade size for a bandsaw one must account for the total cross section of the blade (width and thickness or gauge) and the amount of tension the particular blade type needs, in this case carbide tipped bandsaw blades need over 25,000 psi and closer to 30,000 in most cases, then you have to compare that to what tension the saw can get that blade without negative effects on the saw itself. This is one reason I am a fan of the Resaw King because its thin gauge allows it to be used in larger widths on lesser saws. You can probably go to the 1” RK on the 10-345 or a 3/4” Trimaster. Note you are going to have to go above the 1” mark on the tension scale and basically put all the saw will allow on either blade, basically just before the coild on the spring bottom out against each other.

If you were using a 14” cast saw in your class then a 3/8” carbide blade is probably the max, in fact I doubt a 14” Delta or its clones will even get proper tension on a 3/8” carbide blade without trashing the tracking arm (the wink link on those saws). A 14” Walker Turner or Powermatic 141 would be a different story since they were built much stronger.

In the end you won’t find a better resaw blade, particularly for veneer, than the Laguna Resaw King. I do own and like several other carbide bands inclusing the 2 oft recommended Lenox, they are all good blades but the RK is just better.

View Ironman50's profile

Ironman50

39 posts in 777 days


#19 posted 763 days ago

Thank you for the information Bosox. Your post is definitely worth a read. I appreciate your time going to Google and posting it for us.

View riooso's profile

riooso

38 posts in 1241 days


#20 posted 763 days ago

Thanks everybody for the information. It has really helped.

Take Care,
Richard

View riooso's profile

riooso

38 posts in 1241 days


#21 posted 763 days ago

Thanks everybody for the information. It has really helped.

Take Care,
Richard

View riooso's profile

riooso

38 posts in 1241 days


#22 posted 756 days ago

It has been great to gather information from people that use, or have used, the blade that I was considering. Differing opinions are very helpful because it shows the pros and cons and seeing how it is made by man, it has pros and cons. This item, for me, is pretty pricey.

I settled on the Lenox 1” 3-4 tpi and just got it this morning and could not wait to get it on the saw. This blade is the answer that I have been looking for. I like it…..a lot!

Once again, thanks
Richard

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