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View RetiredCoastie's profile

Cordless tool packages, are they worth the money?

by RetiredCoastie
posted 837 days ago


22 replies so far

View Paul's profile

Paul

343 posts in 2214 days


#1 posted 837 days ago

Mike,
I don’t have recent experience with these, I know batteries are better now than they were a few years ago but my past experience was not great.
You might check out CPO.COM These people have some good deals from time to time on reconditioned tools, I’ve bought a few things from them in the past. You might want to get on their mailing list as they have specials most every week.
Paul

-- If you say 'It's good enough', it probably isn't.

View Dlow's profile

Dlow

70 posts in 1312 days


#2 posted 837 days ago

Absolutely they are! I work in construction and can honestly say that these tools are well worth the price you pay. They do have their limits but I think for what you plan to use them for, you won’t be disappointed. Of coarse there are great differences in the performance based on the voltage you get, as well as the type of batteries they have, bigger tends to be better and the Lithium batteries have a better overall lifespan. I’ve always used Dewalt 14.4v because I didn’t want the bulky 18v and have always had plenty of power for everything I’ve done. I also have an 18v hammer drill and recently bought the 12v drill with the lith battery and was surprised how strong it is. The one thing I’ve learned is that if they don’t get regular use( charge and drain) the batteries won’t last as long and can cost nearly as much as the tool to replace. My impact driver and hammer drill are both over 7 years old, my cordless saw is over 12 and looks brand new and the 12v is 2 years old. Like I said you won’t regret the purchase.

View RetiredCoastie's profile

RetiredCoastie

999 posts in 1807 days


#3 posted 837 days ago

Thanks Dlow & Paul. Great info and much appreciated.

-- www.thepatriotwoodworker.com Proud Supporter of Homes For Our Troops

View hunter71's profile

hunter71

1982 posts in 1811 days


#4 posted 837 days ago

I agree with Paul. BUY LITHIUM BATTERIES. I might also add that the top selling brands with equal size batteries does not vary much. Steer away from the bargain brands, like with everything “you get what you pay for”.

-- A childs smile is payment enough.

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14721 posts in 2300 days


#5 posted 837 days ago

If you already have the power tools in 120 volt, I wouldn’t buy battery primarily for one project. I agree the lithium batteries are the best. Rigid tools have a lifetime warranty including the batteries and I have had good luck with them.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Philzoel's profile

Philzoel

272 posts in 968 days


#6 posted 837 days ago

I have 2 kinds. Black and decker firestorm 14,4 volt. They are 12 years o
D and I am on 3 rd set of batteries. Drill, light, 5” saw, and saws all. No complaints.

Buy in kits at holidays, fathers day. Great discounts. Seems higher volts ought to weigh less, but 14,4 works fine

-- Phil Zoeller louisville, KY

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14721 posts in 2300 days


#7 posted 837 days ago

BTW, Home Depot has a 30 day try out period. If you don’t like it for any reason, full refund.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View RetiredCoastie's profile

RetiredCoastie

999 posts in 1807 days


#8 posted 837 days ago

Topamax wrote: “If you already have the power tools in 120 volt, I wouldn’t buy battery primarily for one project. I agree the lithium batteries are the best. Rigid tools have a lifetime warranty including the batteries and I have had good luck with them.”

Thanks Topamax for the input. I hadn’t looked at Rigid but I will. I agree I have 120V tools except for the recip saw but I would be able to use the skill saw, drill and recip saw on other projects. The wife would use the recip saw instead of getting my fine cut Japanese saw for trimming tree branches which she did when I was on a road trip. Thanks all for your input!

-- www.thepatriotwoodworker.com Proud Supporter of Homes For Our Troops

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14721 posts in 2300 days


#9 posted 836 days ago

I seem to get my recip saw into tight places where the battery one is a bit awkward or just won’t fit. It is a bit heavier than the 120 volt, but it is nice to not have the cord to drag about out in the open.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View jaydubya's profile

jaydubya

183 posts in 1436 days


#10 posted 836 days ago

I have the makita li-ion 18v hammer drill and impact combo and I LOVE it. I fully intend to get the recip saw, circular saw, jigsaw, and blower

View Sawkerf's profile

Sawkerf

1730 posts in 1693 days


#11 posted 836 days ago

ABSOLUTELY!!

Since I’m a light-to-medium duty user, I have all Ryobi One+ 18v cordless tools (two drills, hammer drill, impact driver, circ saw, recip saw, trim router, light). Some are Li-Ion and the rest are NiCad. I got one of their six battery chargers for the shop and never run out of juice. When one dies, I put it on the charger and grab a fresh one.

Whatever brand you choose, the big plus in picking a single brand is that you don’t have to keep multiple chargers around.

-- Adversity doesn't build character...................it reveals it.

View mveach's profile

mveach

56 posts in 1007 days


#12 posted 835 days ago

I have a number of the craftsman c3 tools. not bad at all except the small circle saw is under powered. I hate to say it but if I had it to do over, I would probably with the PC 18 volt. while not the best on the market, the value for the dollar is very good. We got the 4 peace set at work because the price was just too good to pass up. Most of the guys at work aren’t concerned with taking care of the tools and to my surprise, these tools have held up very well. even the saw works quite well. Now they do not have the power of the Dewalt tools we have but, they don’t have the price tag ether. Now if if had a Home Depot here I would consider the Ridged because of the battery replacement guarantee,

View Sawdust4Blood's profile

Sawdust4Blood

346 posts in 1646 days


#13 posted 835 days ago

There are a lot of good cordless tools out there. My experience has been that it is always the batteries hitting the end of their service life that causes failure. As far as I know, Ridgid is the only company whose lifetime warranty on cordless tools includes battery replacement. Since replacement batteries can run a $100 a pop, that’s my go-to answer for cordless tools.

-- Greg, Severn MD

View davidroberts's profile

davidroberts

1002 posts in 2110 days


#14 posted 835 days ago

Some battery operated tools I like, especially the drills, drill drivers. Get the lithium. You’ll be glad you did. If I didn’t already have all the corded tools that typically make up these packages, I’d give it a good look. One thing to consider with any package is you are buying all of whateve that one brand is offering. This can work for you, if you have prior experience with the brand. For instance, I’d probably look at DeWalt or Bosch. That’s just me, though. It does limit your choices for individual tool selection. You may love the sawzall and hate the drill. For whatever reason. CPO reconditioned is an excellent idea. I have bought several reconditioned tools off amazon, well, more like the CPO amazon storefront. I see brand new packages a lot on CL. They make great gifts that the recipient may or may not want. Look on CL or ebay just after father’s day! Not far off.

-- God is great, wood is good. Let us thank Him for wood......and old hand tools.

View PutnamEco's profile

PutnamEco

155 posts in 1910 days


#15 posted 835 days ago

18v circular saws are not really up to construction projects, especailly not Ni-Cad powered ones, you are NOT going to be cutting much plywood with one. 18v reciprocating saws are not much better. 10 minute run time is about all your going to get. 28v-36v are more along the lines of what you’ll want if you plan on doing any serious construction projects, however the price these tools command would make it hard to justify for one or two larger projects. You would probably be better off running corded tools. If it is just for one or two projects, rental tools may even be your best option. Maybe even a rental generator, if your project is to far from an outlet for cords.

I have found that most tool brands have some winners and some losers in the cordless sets. I have had the best luck with Makita as far as sets go. Their circular saw, hammer drill, and impact driver are all good. Their recip saw numbs my hands with vibration. If i was forced to pick a set it would be the LXT601 as it has the largest number of tools I prefer. For occasional use and one or two construction projects this set may be all that you need. I personally would hold off on purchasing though, as I would be holding out for the brushless tools to be released through their line up. You could build shed with this set, but you would be charging a considerable amount of batteries cutting the sheathing, 3-6 cuts per charge, and 2×4s, maybe 20 cuts. This may hold your job up. With a 36v set you’ll probaly only charge 3-4 times a day.

I prefer a mixed set. My favorite cordless circular saw is the Hilti WSC 7.25-A36,It is a blade right saw, like a proper sidewinder should be. The Bosch 1671B is nice as well, but it is only a 6 1/2” bladed tool, the M28 Milwaukee Sawzall (0719-20) is really good and is my first choice. I prefer an 18v drill for most drilling, the Makita BHP451 is my current go to tool, it has held up remarkably well. The Makita LXT impact driver (BDT 141) is a sweet tool, as well.

I don’t have much experience with Rigids tools. The people that I know that do, have said that the warranty is sometime problematic as it requires registration and on occasion long waits for resolutions. There is a thread over on rigidforum about this.

I’m constantly surprised by the number of times I see Ryobi tools on job sites. I know of a couple people that swear by them. If I was on a strict budget I would have to take a long hard look at their line up.

-- “The test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much; it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little.” ― Franklin D. Roosevelt

View RussellAP's profile

RussellAP

2944 posts in 911 days


#16 posted 835 days ago

I like the DeWalt 21v lithium. Very small and light and powerful enough to twist your wrist off. The battery life is long and when it’s time to charge, it’s like someone flipped a switch, time to have an extra battery. I got the drill and impact drill set for something like $250.00 at HD. Before that I had and still have a Cman 19.1v with two batteries and it still works after 5 years.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

View lumberjoe's profile

lumberjoe

2829 posts in 873 days


#17 posted 835 days ago

First, I kind of hate cordless tools. The only one I ever see any value in is drill/drivers. I have a full compliment of wired and air tools for everything else. A cordless driver is pretty handy though. I just got a new one recently. I have always used craftsman ones, because my dad likes to get me one for Christmas every few years. I’ve never had any complaints, and they all did exactly what i asked them too without complaints either. The one I just replaced was one of the 19.2v C3 lithium. I really like the fact that the drill/driver just dies when it’s out of juice, no running lame and burning up your bits. I’ve used hell out of this thing in the past 4 years and the battery finally gave out. This includes building 3 decks and my wife used it to drive about 8 lbs of drywall screws (on a single charge!) assisting me with a renovation.

When getting a new one, I looked around for a while. My corded drill is a Milwaukee magnum that is only 2 years younger than me and used heavily in an industrial setting by a machinist for the past 30+ years. I do some metal work as well as woodwork and I can honestly say there is nothing this drill will not power through. That influenced my decision to grab one of the Milwaukee M18 FUEL redlithium (holy crap is that a lot of names) driver. I just got it two days ago and it’s still in the box so I cannot comment on performance or battery life, but it claims to be amazing. My craftsman drivers usually serve me well for about 4 years. I’m interested to see how this does.

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

1652 posts in 1546 days


#18 posted 835 days ago

I use corded tools for any construction project except for my Makita driver drills. I have two 12 year old 9.6 volt nicad Makitas that work very well for me. I have not used lithium batteries but I have heard LOTS of folks complain that the batteries do not last long. My Ni cads last me 12 years with daily use. I just recently had them rebuilt at a cost of $22 each pack. I see folks in this thread like lithiums, and I wonder why. Run time on my nicads is long enough to have one charging while I use the other battery pack. Run them all day long like that so run time does not make any difference. My Makita impact driver can break off a 3/8” bolt! Plenty of power.

-- In God We Trust

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14721 posts in 2300 days


#19 posted 835 days ago

Great review PutnamEco. I should say me experience with Ridgid is mostly hole sawing metal and driving screws. My use of the battery saws is very intermittent or for just a few cuts.

The one tool that I would love to have in battery is a roto hammer, but price, battery time and the amount of use I would get out of it just doesn’t warrant the cost. Using the cord just makes more sense and cents. Pun intended, of course ;-)

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View rockindavan's profile

rockindavan

283 posts in 1260 days


#20 posted 835 days ago

I bought a 7 piece makita set a couple of years ago. I absolutely could not go without it now. I think I payed around $600 and it came with a drill/hammer drill, impact, circular saw, radio, flashlight, recip saw and grinder. The drill and impact are super awesome. Once you get an impact you will never want to go without one. The circular saw works great but will go through batteries fairly quick. The flashlight, although seems like a useless addition is something you will end up using a lot. The recip saw lacks power with just batteries but I barely use it. The radio is great to have any highly recommend a kit with one. Grinder is also awesome. I would suggest getting a bigger kit if you have the money, you get a better deal with more tools. Also with a big kit you get a bag with luggage wheels and handles which is nice for moving around and loading it with crap. As far as having two cordless drills, you will find the use for them.

View Knothead62's profile

Knothead62

2364 posts in 1585 days


#21 posted 835 days ago

About 6 years ago, I got a set of Ryobi tools- 7 in. circular saw, drill, light, and sander. Now I have three batteries that won’t hold a charge; two still good- for right now. In a pickle as what to do. Replacements are about $50 at the cheapest.

View PutnamEco's profile

PutnamEco

155 posts in 1910 days


#22 posted 834 days ago

Re: Batteries

Batteries do go bad, the price of convenience. My longest living batteries have been Ni-MH followed by Ni-Cds. Li-ion only lasts maybe 5 years if you really baby them. If I go easy on my Ni-Cads I can get 6-7 years out of them, however If I use them hard daily (4-5 plus cycles daily) they don’t last a year. Ni-MH Last about 18 months to 2 years of daily hard use. I do have some Ni-MH from 2006 that still have some life left in them, Not much life, but some. These have NOT been used hard but have been kept charged, Lastly, Li-ion even barely being used will die in 5 years. In daily heavy use I expect to get about 1 year out of them before they degrade to the point where I consider them unusable. If I just use them moderately (1-2 cycles daily) they seem to last about three years.
When new, Ni-Cds, when not used, will hold a decent charge for about a month. Ni-MH will hold a workable charge for about 2+ weeks,these batteries lose this capability noticeably as they age. After about a year, they don’t go to work with me unless they have been charged immediately prior to use. Li-ion will hold a decent charge for 3+ months.
I believe I get the most work out of Li-ion, they charge quickly and run a long time. Next I would say the Ni-MH give a fairly long run time provided they have a fresh charge. Ni-Cd have the shortest run time.

Ni-Cds are the best candidates for rebuilding, Higher quality cells are readily available and there are many rebuilders. I like to use MTO Battery for my rebuilds. They will also rebuild Ni-MH. I have not found anyone willing to rebuild Li-ion batteries. You can find Li-ion cells should you wish a DIY option.

-- “The test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much; it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little.” ― Franklin D. Roosevelt

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