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View revanson11's profile

Bandsaw blade recommendation

by revanson11
posted 03-12-2012 01:42 AM


32 replies so far

View interpim's profile

interpim

1133 posts in 2202 days


#1 posted 03-12-2012 01:46 AM

i would recommend a 1/2” 4 tpi blade from woodslicer. I use it for most of my work on the bandsaw.

-- San Diego, CA

View revanson11's profile

revanson11

70 posts in 1077 days


#2 posted 03-12-2012 02:24 AM

Thanks interpim for your fast reply. Is the blade suitable for cutting curves or only re-sawing?

-- Randy, Central MN

View JAAune's profile

JAAune

964 posts in 1060 days


#3 posted 03-12-2012 03:25 AM

I use a 1/2” 3tpi blade for 95% of my cutting. That includes curves and resawing. I haven’t found it necessary to use anything else unless I’m cutting a tight radius in which case I’ll use a 1/4” blade instead.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

View interpim's profile

interpim

1133 posts in 2202 days


#4 posted 03-12-2012 11:55 AM

ditto what revanson said… I use mine to cut curves and some resawing.

-- San Diego, CA

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

3579 posts in 2704 days


#5 posted 03-12-2012 02:29 PM

I’ll wade in here ‘cause opinions are like noses. I use the 1/2” Woodslicer too, but not for general use. I find a 1/4” or 3/8” 6 tpi to be the better GP blade for my uses.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

6032 posts in 2172 days


#6 posted 03-12-2012 02:40 PM

Hi Randy,
Check out this company SUPERCUTS.
Order their catalog. They pack a lot of relevant info in it.
I find that their blades cut well and seem to last longer than others I’ve tried.
As to what sizes you need, an easy rule of thumb is to double the blade’s width to find the smallest radius it can turn. Another rule of thumb: More teeth equals smoother cuts but lots slower feed rate. For much of my curved work, I use a 3/16, 4TPI. For resawing, I use a 5/8, 3TPI.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

6967 posts in 1658 days


#7 posted 03-12-2012 03:20 PM

I have a TW 3/4in 3TPI on my 14in Rikon and I love it. To be honest, I use the BS mostly for resawing and have found that moving from 1/2in to 3/4in was noticably an improvement and made it easier to maintain a straight cut line.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View jmos's profile

jmos

681 posts in 1113 days


#8 posted 03-12-2012 03:23 PM

Timberwolf blades are also very nice, and has a lot of info on their website. http://www.suffolkmachinery.com/

-- John

View wooded's profile

wooded

308 posts in 1016 days


#9 posted 03-12-2012 03:34 PM

I have found that fine teeth for a fine cut is a myth. A high quality 4tpi will cut very smoothly. Choose the width according to curve charts for your purposes. I dont think I would duplicate the size that comes on the saw using it for rougher use til it is donefor…...:j

-- Joe in Pueblo West, Colo. jdelong264@msn.com

View bobdurnell's profile

bobdurnell

306 posts in 2641 days


#10 posted 03-12-2012 03:37 PM

revanson11—I’ll give you my 2 cents, I really like the timber wolf 1/4in ten tooth blade since I have always used a blade with less teeth. I used to use a 1/4inch 6 tooth and then went to a 1/2inch 4 tooth and now when I begin to cut most anything with the 1/4in 10 tooth the blade doesn’t seem to grab at the beginning of the cut.

-- bobdurnell, Santa Ana California.

View Sawdust4Blood's profile

Sawdust4Blood

364 posts in 1765 days


#11 posted 03-12-2012 03:41 PM

I think of the blades that come with bandsaws not as blades at all but rather just the filler they use in that space for shipping. Never seen one yet that came with a really good blade but you may want to try yours just s you can actually see the difference when you put a good blade on it.

Timberwolf and woodslicer are both good brands. While it’s true that more TPI generally means a smoother finish, I choose TPI based on the number teeth that will be in the wood at the same time so for me it’s 3 or 4 TPI for resawing or large bracket feet and 10 TPI if the wood being cut is 2 inches or less in thickness. Larger blade widths allow for higher tension and reduce blade drift but limit how tight a radius you can cut. Smaller widths cut tighter curves but with less tension and consequently more drift. So it all depends on what you want to cut. If you’re making small wooden toys or bandsaw boxes, you might want a 3/16 or 1/4 inch blade but if you’re making furniture size pieces, the 1/2 or larger might work fine. Blade changes are actually fast and easy on my bandsaw so I go back and forth depending on the task. Other people have saws that make adjusting a bear for blade changes so they tend to stick with one general purpose blade as much as they can. As they say, individual results may vary….

-- Greg, Severn MD

View Camero68's profile

Camero68

64 posts in 925 days


#12 posted 06-20-2012 09:34 PM

There is a kind of blade specifically designed for what you are cutting.
Hardback carbon blades are ideal for cutting hard woods. Flexback carbon blades are for soft woods and mild steels. For steels, you should be using bi-metal blades. These blades are available at www.sawblade.com.

View AHuxley's profile

AHuxley

208 posts in 2065 days


#13 posted 06-20-2012 10:27 PM

@Camero68 Hardback blades are NOT recommended for small wheeled bandsaws and the flexibility of the backer has nothing to do with whether a blade is good for soft or hardwood. Although bi-metal blades can be good for cutting metal they can also be excellent for cutting wood, like the above it depends on the set, tooth pattern, TPI etc not the type of metal the teeth/band are made of. Since it is beginning to appear like you are a shill for sawblade.com I would expect better information from you…

View doninvegas's profile

doninvegas

332 posts in 1651 days


#14 posted 06-20-2012 11:18 PM

I have a 14” Delta band saw and I use the ½” Woodslicer for re-sawing and the ¼” Timberwolf for everything else. Both are very good blades

-- "Courage is being scared to death -- but saddling up anyway."

View AHuxley's profile

AHuxley

208 posts in 2065 days


#15 posted 06-20-2012 11:30 PM

@doninvegas Regarding the Woodslicer you can get the same Atlanta Sharptech stock from either Iturra Designs (Bladerunner) or Spectrum Supply (Kerfmaster) for less money, depending on the size significantly less. The only other issue besides the stock is the weld and Iturra and Spectrum both do excellent welds.

View Camero68's profile

Camero68

64 posts in 925 days


#16 posted 06-21-2012 07:39 PM

@AHuxley:

Although hardback carbon blades are not always recommended for smaller bandsaws, they are still economical if you wanted to get straighter cuts. And the blade life is much better. If you have tried running your machine with either blades as I have, you will know the difference. I guess what I’m trying to say here is that if you want to make the most out of your blade and your money, hardback blades would be a better option especially when doing contour cuts and re-saws on vertical machines which I think most of us in the wood industry do.
And bi-metals can be excellent for wood too, not question about that. But the price on these bi-metal blades are way much higher than the carbon. I would not spend extra dollars on bi-metal blades just to cut wood when I can save on using the carbon.

View Woodbum's profile

Woodbum

485 posts in 1809 days


#17 posted 06-21-2012 09:01 PM

IMHO use the 1/2” 3TPI Woodslicer from Highland Hardware for resawing only. Do not cut curses with it or you will seriously degrade its resawing abilities. Use AllPro blades for curves ,the blade width determined by the radii that you will be cutting and forgeneral purpose and put the Woodslicer on for resawing. All of your blades will last longer if used for the purpose that they were designed for.

-- Improvidus, Apto quod Victum-- Improvise, Adapt, Overcome

View AHuxley's profile

AHuxley

208 posts in 2065 days


#18 posted 06-21-2012 09:47 PM

@Camero68 It sounds like you are coming from a metal cutting background and not a wood cutting background.

Industry standard for hardback blades is 15’ minimum a limited number of people here will have saws that meet this requirement and that standard is based on traditional vertical bandsaws not the current rage over vertical resaw bandsaws. I can go to my shop right now and pop on a 1 1/4” carbon flexback blade on my vertical resaw and cut 16+” veneer with less than .002” variation between sheets throughout the flitch no need for a hardback blade, it wouldn’t do any better just fatigue quicker and break. Hardbacks have their place but just not in most hobby shops or light commercial shops, most good saws shops won’t weld a short hardback band. I find it funny you recommend carbon over bi-metal for economy, anyone with any experience with bandsaw blades knows that they last far longer than carbon and will save LOTS of money compared to carbon blades over the long haul, even more savings of high silicon steel and spring steel blades. The bi-metal blades will need higher tension, in the 25,000-30,000 psi range and since they have greater beam strngth and a higher resistance to twist they have the ability to cut straighter than carbon blades. Carbide tipped blades with their high tensions and ground as opposed to set teeth will cut even straighter and outlast bi-metal by multiples, they will save money over all the other blade types if one uses them enough.

Please don’t tell me to get blades at sawblades.com…

View AHuxley's profile

AHuxley

208 posts in 2065 days


#19 posted 06-21-2012 09:53 PM

@Woodbum, correct the Woodslicer (and all the other blades made from Atlanta Sharptech stock) do not do well cutting curves as they have practically no set. They are actually a band that was repurposed from the meat cutting industry, they are spring steel with impulse hardened teeth and although they are very sharp initially they dull very quickly. Their main use is small bandsaws that can’t properly tension a true resaw blade AND/OR use on any saw when the wood savings from their very thin kerf is important. I don’t know if Highland sells the .016 gauge AS stock but Spectrum Supply and I think Iturra does, AS also makes .022 gauge bands which I think is what Highland stocks.

For contour cutting on smaller saws Olson also makes the MVP bi-metal blades which are excellent on small saws due to their thin gauge.

View doninvegas's profile

doninvegas

332 posts in 1651 days


#20 posted 06-21-2012 11:59 PM

AHuxley,
I haven’t used any of the blades you mention. I can only tell you what I use and has worked for me. I am not an expert on band saw blades. Most of the stuff I have read about them is way over my head. I guess I’m a mere mortal.

-- "Courage is being scared to death -- but saddling up anyway."

View MonteCristo's profile

MonteCristo

2098 posts in 932 days


#21 posted 06-22-2012 02:38 AM

I agree with Ahuxley that bi-metal and carbide are cost effective. Carbon blades don’t last very long and while the bi-metal and carbide are more expensive, for me it’s a no-brainer, unless of course you really like changing bandsaw blades.

-- Dwight - "Free legal advice available - contact Dewey, Cheetam & Howe""

View Woodbum's profile

Woodbum

485 posts in 1809 days


#22 posted 06-22-2012 01:02 PM

Athuxley: great minds think alike

-- Improvidus, Apto quod Victum-- Improvise, Adapt, Overcome

View Camero68's profile

Camero68

64 posts in 925 days


#23 posted 06-22-2012 09:07 PM

@AHuxley:

Although hardback carbon blades are not always recommended for smaller bandsaws, they are still economical if you wanted to get straighter cuts. And the blade life is much better. If you have tried running your machine with either blades as I have, you will know the difference. I guess what I’m trying to say here is that if you want to make the most out of your blade and your money, hardback blades would be a better option especially when doing contour cuts and re-saws on vertical machines which I think most of us in the wood industry do.
And bi-metals can be excellent for wood too, not question about that. But the price on these bi-metal blades are way much higher than the carbon. I would not spend extra dollars on bi-metal blades just to cut wood when I can save on using the carbon.

View b2rtch's profile

b2rtch

4351 posts in 1792 days


#24 posted 06-22-2012 09:41 PM

Did you consider bi-metal blades they are more expensive but they last for ever.

-- Bert

View AHuxley's profile

AHuxley

208 posts in 2065 days


#25 posted 06-22-2012 10:07 PM

@Camero68 Now you are just cutting and pasting… Do you honestly know anything about bandsaw blades for wood or are you just using a group of canned replys written by someone else possibly for marketing purposes?

Selling hardback blades to people with small diamter saw wheels would be a good business model since they are going to have to replace them when metal fatigue sets in and the blades crack at the gullets and pop…

If one uses their bandsaw much bi-metal is far more cost effective than carbon blades. A quality 1/4” carbon band like a Lenox will run you a little over a buck a foot, a Lenox bi-metal 1/4” blade will run a little under $3.00 a foot BUT outlast the carbon blade 8 or more times making the bi-metal blade far less expensive in the long run. Carbide blades counting resharpening are more economical BUT recouping the initial investment takes a lot of wood cut, bi-metal is really the sweet spot for most serious hobbyists.

View ElChe's profile

ElChe

180 posts in 80 days


#26 posted 10-10-2014 06:07 AM

3/8” 3 or 4 tpi with .025 thickness is my go to blade. I go carbon mostly. Cheap and durable although not the smoothest cut. i always hit my resaws with my trusty hand plane or drum sander so not a problem. BC SAW AND TOOLS used to be the best buy for me because the welds were perfect but they were bought by NAP GLADU since I last ordered. Timberwolf blades are awesome initially but they dull to quick for my preference. And I’ve gotten some sketchy welds from TW that i bought through Suffolk. Great return policy so not a problem. Spend some quality time setting up the bandsaw. A tight set up of guides, table, wheels, etc. will do you more than a premium blade.

oh, i still use the stock delta blade on my bandsaw when I am cutting questionable boards. :) tom

-- Tom - Measure twice cut once. Then measure again. Curse. Fudge.

View ElChe's profile

ElChe

180 posts in 80 days


#27 posted 10-10-2014 06:08 AM

If you go real thin in terms of usual materials, less than1/2”, more TPI seems to give better cuts in curves. Enjoy! Tom

-- Tom - Measure twice cut once. Then measure again. Curse. Fudge.

View The Box Whisperer's profile

The Box Whisperer

678 posts in 814 days


#28 posted 10-10-2014 08:57 AM

I grabbed a Viking blade from Lee Valley for my 14” rehab and its really nice at 24 clams (Canadian)

-- "despite you best efforts and your confidence that your smarter and faster than a saw blade at 10k rpm…. your not …." - Charles Neil

View distrbd's profile

distrbd

1301 posts in 1190 days


#29 posted 10-10-2014 12:21 PM



If you go real thin in terms of usual materials, less than1/2”, more TPI seems to give better cuts in curves. Enjoy! Tom

- ElChe


I hope he’s figured it out by now,the thread is 2 years old.

-- Ken from Ontario

View ChuckV's profile

ChuckV

2473 posts in 2271 days


#30 posted 10-10-2014 01:16 PM


If you go real thin in terms of usual materials, less than1/2”, more TPI seems to give better cuts in curves. Enjoy! Tom

- ElChe

I hope he s figured it out by now,the thread is 2 years old.

- distrbd

Yet another victim of the time-stamp change!

Today is 10-10-2014. Is that October 10th or is it October 10th?

-- “While the world with closed eyes sleeps, The sky knows and weeps - steel rain. ” ― Nathan Bell

View mramseyISU's profile

mramseyISU

103 posts in 289 days


#31 posted 10-10-2014 03:10 PM

Simmonds Red Streaks are what we used almost exclusivly in our sawmill. You can get them for a standard 14” too.

-- Trust me I'm an engineer.

View ElChe's profile

ElChe

180 posts in 80 days


#32 posted 10-14-2014 12:12 AM

Maybe he hasn’t figured out what blade to get. It’s only been two years after all. sheesh! ;)

-- Tom - Measure twice cut once. Then measure again. Curse. Fudge.

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