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View Craftsman on the lake's profile

The right screw (head)

by Craftsman on the lake
posted 02-19-2012 05:23 AM


28 replies so far

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11676 posts in 2404 days


#1 posted 02-19-2012 05:29 AM

Nothing better than a good screw !
I’ve used these myself , and they are great : )

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

View Tyrone D's profile

Tyrone D

314 posts in 1049 days


#2 posted 02-19-2012 07:07 AM

To fix the problem of the Philips design being flawed: Robertson. I have never stripped a Robertson but I have stripped many Philips before.

Aren’t these just Torx with some improvements?

I’ll have to try out these screws sometime. The promotional video is very convincing on their improvements.

-- --Tyrone - BC, Canada "Nothing is ever perfect, we just run out of time."

View redryder's profile

redryder

2217 posts in 1818 days


#3 posted 02-19-2012 07:28 AM

Some how I got on the catalog mailing list for McFeely’s. If you haven’t heard of this company, you might want to check them out. www.mcfeelys.com They will give you an easy to understand education on “screws” on the first few pages of thier catalog. Everything you ever wanted to know about the right screw for the job. If you check out thier web site, go to “Product tips and info” on the top tool bar then “screw and fastener center” on the left side of page. Then select “Guide to Woodworking screws.” They also sell a lot of other woodworking this and that including power tools.

Using the wrong screws can be frustrating and a waste of money. McFeelys may help someone keep from stumbling along like I was. Good luck….................

-- mike...............

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

2407 posts in 2154 days


#4 posted 02-19-2012 11:29 AM

I’ve had the ones with the square driver head and they’re a vast improvement over phillips but these hold the bit even better.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View DIYaholic's profile

DIYaholic

14027 posts in 1391 days


#5 posted 02-19-2012 01:43 PM

What? Ya’ll have a screw loose!!! I like a good STRIP SHOW, but not from my fastener. PNUEMATICS; That’s where it at!!! Lol. JK

Craftsman on the lake,
Great information. I too suffer from the scurge of philips head gougingitus! I will have to give these screws a try.

redryder,
Thanks for the link, I like to educate myself with info like that.

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procratination a bad thing?

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

15712 posts in 2935 days


#6 posted 02-19-2012 02:45 PM

I’ll admit these are a big improvement over phillips head screws. Still, I have to say that I rarely strip a non-brass phillips head screw as long as I take care of two prerequisites: a proper pilot hole, and the correct clutch setting on my drill.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View grizzman's profile

grizzman

7147 posts in 2020 days


#7 posted 02-19-2012 02:58 PM

i had not seen those screws dan, they look as though they would drive so nice, and if i were to vote as far as a re design for the bulk of screws that come out, i would say it can be done better and start making them like that…i know and agree with charlie , but over all i think they could be more like what you have shown here…im all for improving ….grizz

-- GRIZZMAN ...[''''']

View mtenterprises's profile

mtenterprises

832 posts in 1409 days


#8 posted 02-19-2012 03:18 PM

We are all guilty of just trying to shoot the screws into the wood without the proper pilot holes. We are in too much of a hurry, we want things instantly so we cut corners. Think about this, did the craftsman of old try running in slotted screws without a pilot hole? Think about the evolution of the screw and screwdriver and how it has caused us to want to work faster cutting corners.
MIKE

-- See pictures on Flickr - http://www.flickr.com/photos/44216106@N07/ And visit my Facebook page - facebook.com/MTEnterprises

View DIYaholic's profile

DIYaholic

14027 posts in 1391 days


#9 posted 02-19-2012 03:45 PM

mtenterprises,
I don’t have time to THINK about such things…...I’m way to preoccupied with gettin’ this damn screw in!!! Lol.

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procratination a bad thing?

View Greg..the Cajun Wood Artist's profile

Greg..the Cajun Wood Artist

5214 posts in 2025 days


#10 posted 02-19-2012 04:04 PM

These screws seem like they are just the thing for someone building decks or construction work in thick woods. About the only screws I use are for pocket hole joinery or installing hinges… and in my case I always take the time to drill correct pilot holes. I am never in too much of a hurry that I would cut corners.

-- We all must start somewhere in our journey of doing what we love to do.

View Bluepine38's profile

Bluepine38

2933 posts in 1802 days


#11 posted 02-19-2012 04:11 PM

GRK makes a good screw, they are called a torx drive and take the regular torx bits. I have replaced almost
all my screws with the torx type. When I put my front deck in I used the special coated torx screws for the
pressure treated frame work, and the only reason I used two bits for 1/4 keg of screws was because I
dropped and lost the first bit. The bigger torx screws, up to 7” & longer, might require an impact driver,
but most drive easily with my cordless Milwaukee 1/2” drill. I used the stainless torx screws made for Trek
decking, but I did have to drill a small pilot hole to get them started, my hands had a tough time holding
them steady enough to get them to start themselves in the Trek deck. So far I have not found a good
source for torx bronze screws, so I use the square drive bronze on my lathe face plates. While the GRKs
are expensive, they are available at Ace Hardware also, there are a few companies following their lead and
the price may drop somewhat.

-- As ever, Gus-the 75 yr young apprentice carpenter

View poopiekat's profile

poopiekat

3708 posts in 2451 days


#12 posted 02-19-2012 04:14 PM

It’ll be a long time before these old eyes can accept a Torx, or even a Robertson square-drive screw on a piece of fine, heritage-level furniture. For knocking out a new kitchen, well, okay, use the screws with a more positive drive. Personally, I love seeing the fussiness on a piano hinge or cabinet latch. My junior-high Practical Arts instructor gushed over how at the Rolls-Royce factory, workers had to align every visible Phillips head screw to an ‘X’ when installing walnut or rosewood trim in the interiors. Should we shortchange our own fine furniture with a feature that shows we took an easy way out? Good point, however, COTL!

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

3529 posts in 2677 days


#13 posted 02-19-2012 04:46 PM

ECD there Poopie? (Chuckle….)
I try to use the screw that fits the period style of the piece I’m workin’ on, but the Robertsons and Torx jobbies have spoiled me.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View waho6o9's profile (online now)

waho6o9

5184 posts in 1293 days


#14 posted 02-19-2012 05:03 PM

fastenpro@hotmail.com Nancy sells the GRKs and they are great people to do business with.
GRKs save time and are a pleasure to use. There are many different types and styles of GRKs and the new ones go into concrete.
I haven’t used the concrete ones yet, but I can’t imagine them being junk.

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

2407 posts in 2154 days


#15 posted 02-19-2012 08:33 PM

Actually except for framing and hinges, I drill, countersink, and make plugs for all my screws in woodwork. So, I use these the same as regular screws. For framing/carcass work in soft wood though it’s nice that they self drill. It saves a lot of work. For those who say we need to take the time like the old timers used to, well maybe we need to go back to square tempered nails or wooden screw pegs??? And what you using a battery driver for? You should be using a hand driver.

It’s like the guy who took a handful of pills every day and had a pacemaker who said, “If things were like the olden days we’d all be a lot better off.”... Ya, he’d be dead!

Progress people, progress.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

2924 posts in 1960 days


#16 posted 02-19-2012 08:51 PM

I used to have problems driving philips head screws when using a driver/drill. When I got my impact driver, the stripping problem went away. It also depends on the quality of the screws. The ones from China are like butter. Robertson drive screws work well too, but the bit sometimes get stuck in the head and pulls out of the driver. Annoying when driving deck screws. Use an impact driver and you will never have a problem regardless of the thpe of drive you use.

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1831 days


#17 posted 02-19-2012 08:58 PM

some say they are torx screws maybee 99 % right
but don´t be surpriced if you run into pentalope screws instead they look
very simular to torx screws and they come tamperproof as well as the torx does

and if you wonder …. the industri have started to use a three-wing screw as well
some will call them Y-screws but if you look at how the screwdrivers is made to them
they are look different to each other

am I tired of all those different screws …. yes becourse you have to dubble since they
all is made as male and female + there is a tamperproof version of them tooo
then I havn´t talked about those you rarely see
so if you are like me …. do little of everything from small repair on the car /truck to electronics + the house
the tooltote need to hold pretty much 200 screwdrivers alone

then comes all the other socketspanners and wrenches
is there others that think you need to be a mucleman before you can be a handyman …. LOL

Dennis

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1831 days


#18 posted 02-19-2012 09:00 PM

OOH I forgot to say phillips and pozydrive ain´t the same screw
and many have destroyd the screw by using the wrong screwdriver in this case

View DIYaholic's profile

DIYaholic

14027 posts in 1391 days


#19 posted 02-19-2012 09:00 PM

Craftsman on the lake,
I agree, with limited exceptions. Heirloom pieces, deserve time honored joinery, I’m not saying handcut dovetails necessarily but dovetails non the less (as an example). Pocket holes on carcasses & faceframes, IMO are Ok. Then there’s the value issue. Some people have champagne tastes and beer budgets. You can get quality while reducing costs. Ply is accepted as the norm, but is particle board really progress. I feel there is a place for everything, it depends upon your/the customers sensibilities and opinions. Ultimately, in todays world it sometimes boils down to how deep are your pockets.
Just my $0.02

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procratination a bad thing?

View surfin2's profile

surfin2

51276 posts in 1852 days


#20 posted 02-19-2012 09:02 PM

Recently I have discovered GRK screws.

Assume screws…

Aren’t these just Torx with some improvements?_

Depending on who makes them there called Star or Torx…

I preferred the square head til the torx/star head came out…

GRK are beefier screw .. .

-- Rick

View jumbojack's profile

jumbojack

1202 posts in 1340 days


#21 posted 02-19-2012 09:28 PM

A proper pilot hole and I drag the screw threads across a candle before driving them. NEVER a problem. #2 half inch screws just recently into a hard maple frame; like sticking a hot knife in butter.

-- Made in America, with American made tools....Shopsmith

View ohtimberwolf's profile

ohtimberwolf

292 posts in 1069 days


#22 posted 02-20-2012 12:21 AM

I keep a toilet bowl ring nearby and the only thing I have to watch is that I don’t drive them too deep. That stuf really works good, is cheap and easy to use.

-- Used to be a barn cat, now a lap cat...

View BentheViking's profile

BentheViking

1753 posts in 1280 days


#23 posted 02-20-2012 04:10 AM

I’d say robertsons are the only thing I’ve never had issues with at one point or another. Pozidrive are a bit better than phillips but they are pretty rare.

-- It's made of wood. Real sturdy.--Chubbs Peterson

View Bill1225's profile

Bill1225

125 posts in 1116 days


#24 posted 02-20-2012 04:16 AM

lowes sometimes has cabinet screws with torx head and now home depot has started carrying spax brand and some of there screws are torx. We use them daily , they are great and not that expensive

View surfin2's profile

surfin2

51276 posts in 1852 days


#25 posted 02-20-2012 04:28 AM

screws screws screws

-- Rick

View grizzman's profile

grizzman

7147 posts in 2020 days


#26 posted 02-20-2012 06:13 AM

your onto something here dan, maybe we should all get a water mill and convert our tools to belt drive off the water mill..i saw one on tv th other day…it worded pretty good…the saws for it were like 10 feet long, sharpen them by hand…....or we could get a couple of mules…walk in circles all day turning the gears that turn the belts…after a day or so, i might be screaming for my lithium ion…and my 3hp delta table saw..i like advancement and i like some of the old ways..mixing them in for my enjoyment for how i like it best, but in the interest of these screws i welcome the better ones…

-- GRIZZMAN ...[''''']

View mtenterprises's profile

mtenterprises

832 posts in 1409 days


#27 posted 02-20-2012 11:49 AM

Rick – Extensive list very interesting.
MIKE

-- See pictures on Flickr - http://www.flickr.com/photos/44216106@N07/ And visit my Facebook page - facebook.com/MTEnterprises

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11676 posts in 2404 days


#28 posted 02-20-2012 03:44 PM

http://www.mcfeelys.com/email.aspx?emailID=XC08001X&src=XC08001X
McFeely’s screw sale.

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

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