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View ldl's profile

Glue up of thin pieces

by ldl
posted 01-25-2012 11:37 PM


23 replies so far

View DS's profile

DS

2132 posts in 1165 days


#1 posted 01-25-2012 11:44 PM

I just use regular bar clamps.
On thin stock, I’ll usually put a spring clamp across the joints to help keep them flush.

If your parts try to bow or flex under the weight and presure of the clamps, you can lay them on a peice of plywood scrap and clamp the joints AND the plywood with the spring clamps. That ensures things stay where they should until the glue dries. (Wax the face of the ply scrap, or use wax paper or plastic wrap to keep the glue runout from bonding your workpiece to the ply.)

I’ve even been known to use spring clamps to secure thin stock to the bar of the bar clamp, since it was just sitting there all straight and in the right place.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View ldl's profile

ldl

1135 posts in 1110 days


#2 posted 01-26-2012 01:48 AM

I think I’m gettin senile. Forgot to post pictures.

-- Dewayne in Bainbridge, Ga. - - No one can make you mad. Only you decide when you get mad - -

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

15780 posts in 2963 days


#3 posted 01-26-2012 02:52 AM

+1 for DS251’s advice. And remember you don’t need a ton of clamping pressure.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View ELCfinefurniture's profile

ELCfinefurniture

112 posts in 1065 days


#4 posted 01-26-2012 05:32 AM

If your edges are jointed good you barely need clamping preasure which largely reduces the possibility for the pieces to cup or pop out of alignment during glue up. Also one last precaution to take might be to glue the 3 panels up in 2 stages. Glue 2 together then glue the section to the remaining single piece.
But just make sure the edges are jointed to perfection and little preasure will be needed.

-- {Current North Bennet street school student}

View ldl's profile

ldl

1135 posts in 1110 days


#5 posted 01-27-2012 06:04 AM

Thanks guys for the advice. Like I said I’ve never tried to glue thin boards so this was very helpful. I don’t have a joiner but I used a hand held planer to plane the edges before gluing.

-- Dewayne in Bainbridge, Ga. - - No one can make you mad. Only you decide when you get mad - -

View ksSlim's profile

ksSlim

1011 posts in 1635 days


#6 posted 01-27-2012 06:41 AM

If you are edge jointing with a hand plane, clamp BOTH pieces of stock in the vise with their edges as flush as possible, apply plane as normal to both pieces at the same time. edges will mate after a few strokes.

-- Sawdust and shavings are therapeutic

View Joe Lyddon's profile

Joe Lyddon

7928 posts in 2797 days


#7 posted 01-27-2012 07:28 AM

@ldl
I ran into a similar problem when I resawed a 2×4 to 1/4 & 3/8 strips, jointing, and gluing to get panels for my 2×4 project… 3×5 box. This is what I did:

Start like you did EXCEPT:

1. Add another clamp in the middle.

2. Have Spring clamps on each side to hold ends together horizontally; over each glue point.

3. Put a piece of scrap 1×6 & 2×4 on top & in the middle (protected with waxed paper) (same direction as the clamps, but on Top) then pile on some concrete blocks to make sure everything stayed FLAT!

Worked like a charm!

Note: I tried much like your setup… would NOT stay FLAT... had to cut apart on the seams and REGLUE as done above.

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

View Frank's profile

Frank

19 posts in 1056 days


#8 posted 01-27-2012 01:10 PM

I agree with Jo Lydon. Just remember to put blocks under your two outside clamps on both ends of the clamp and put the middle clamp on top facing down, not underneath like the outside two. The blocks will raise the height of the two outside clamps (off the table) and allow the upper middle clamp to come down closer to the wood and reduce the cupping. Remember that too much pressure from your clamps will not only cup the wood but could end up starving the joint of all the glue due to excessive squeeze out. Just a thought, hope it helped Dewayne.
Frank

View Joe Lyddon's profile

Joe Lyddon

7928 posts in 2797 days


#9 posted 01-27-2012 07:37 PM

I had the Middle clamp on the bottom so the wood cauls & concrete blocks would press against the middle clamp pipe (bar).

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

View buffalosean's profile

buffalosean

174 posts in 2132 days


#10 posted 01-27-2012 07:42 PM

Great explanation Joe!!!

-- There are many ways to skin a cat...... but, the butter knife is not recommended

View DS's profile

DS

2132 posts in 1165 days


#11 posted 01-27-2012 07:48 PM

The recent 2X4 contest was the most resawing I’d done I think ever.

Gluing the thin strips had the added challenge that the freshly resawn boards had uneven moisture content.

Clamping the glue-up to a piece of scrap ply allowed both the glue and the workpiece to dry flat at the same time. The initial cupping tendency disappeared by the next day in the clamps.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View Joe Lyddon's profile

Joe Lyddon

7928 posts in 2797 days


#12 posted 01-27-2012 07:52 PM

I let my resawn boards acclimate a while before glue-ups… I think the moisture from the glue made a slight difference…

I tried doing it the traditional way… to run into trouble… I cut them apart & tried again, as I have described, and all was OK.

edit:
I also glued up 3 panels in ONE glue-up for the Sides… used plenty of waxed paper… the boards & concrete blocks were needed to keep it all FLAT. On the Top/Bottom panels, it was 2 panels at a time.

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

View ldl's profile

ldl

1135 posts in 1110 days


#13 posted 01-28-2012 03:58 AM

I appreciate all the advice given.

I did use three clamps in the glued up. I just had them sitting in the clamps in the picture. I didn’t think about moisture diff in the thinner boards. The wood came from HD so didn’t think about moisture. I will be more patient next time. I did press down on the center clamp which I had on the top and used a small clamp on the ends at the joints. Next time I do this I will try the weighting idea as there is a slight bow in the glue up but I think it will pull up ok when I assemble the project.

This is my first experience at resawing and it was interesting trying to get even boards. I have a older 12” Craftsman bandsaw and used a stock from sears 1/2” blade. Not the best I know but it werked fairly well.

The wood is Red Oak as that is all the hard wood that HD carries. I usually werk in pine and this also is one of my first ventures into hard wood. I have turned a few cedar & oak bowls but never built anything except the scones I posted earlier. Sure is harder to sand hardwood than pine.

-- Dewayne in Bainbridge, Ga. - - No one can make you mad. Only you decide when you get mad - -

View Joe Lyddon's profile

Joe Lyddon

7928 posts in 2797 days


#14 posted 01-28-2012 04:10 AM

It’s really simple to Rip-Cut down the center of each seam and reglue them…

The weight in the middle removes all guesswork… It stays Flat.

Good luck.

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

View ldl's profile

ldl

1135 posts in 1110 days


#15 posted 01-28-2012 05:57 PM

Thanks Joe for your input. You brought out some things I had never though of.

That’s why I like this site. Always someone willing to share ideas. I always relish the constructive criticism as that is how you learn.

-- Dewayne in Bainbridge, Ga. - - No one can make you mad. Only you decide when you get mad - -

View Joe Lyddon's profile

Joe Lyddon

7928 posts in 2797 days


#16 posted 01-28-2012 09:32 PM

Very good Dewayne… hope it helps…
... One thing good about that 2×4 project, I learned something about gluing up thin panels! LOL

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

View ldl's profile

ldl

1135 posts in 1110 days


#17 posted 01-29-2012 04:16 AM

Any suggestions for putting the unit together. I had planned to use butt joints and maybe shoot a brad or two where it wouldn’t be seen. I will finish sanding either tomorrow or Monday then start cutting into pieces. What would be the best way to assemble? Again little or no experience with thin boards.

-- Dewayne in Bainbridge, Ga. - - No one can make you mad. Only you decide when you get mad - -

View Joe Lyddon's profile

Joe Lyddon

7928 posts in 2797 days


#18 posted 01-29-2012 06:28 AM

I don’t know what your ‘plate holder’ looks like… let alone tell you how to make one… LOL

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

View ldl's profile

ldl

1135 posts in 1110 days


#19 posted 01-31-2012 05:27 AM

Joe I understand. A very poor pic of it is in the first pic above on the boards. My interest is how to best join narrow boards. Like I said above I guess I’ll use butt joints and maybe put a couple of brads in an out the way place unless anyone recommends a better way.

Thanks for the advice so far.

-- Dewayne in Bainbridge, Ga. - - No one can make you mad. Only you decide when you get mad - -

View Joe Lyddon's profile

Joe Lyddon

7928 posts in 2797 days


#20 posted 01-31-2012 06:59 AM

Oh, OK… can barely make it out…

I think I would use rabbets in the front & back pieces around the framework… dados for the shelf & dividers…

The back could be Ship-lapped across the back with horiz. rails going across top & bottom for mounting.
(but, hey, you already have the stuff glued together! LOL ) It’s OK…

Nothing fancy.

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

View ldl's profile

ldl

1135 posts in 1110 days


#21 posted 02-01-2012 07:23 PM

Thanks everyone.

-- Dewayne in Bainbridge, Ga. - - No one can make you mad. Only you decide when you get mad - -

View Joe Lyddon's profile

Joe Lyddon

7928 posts in 2797 days


#22 posted 02-02-2012 04:27 AM

You’re going to show us the Finished product… aren’t you?

I’m curious how ended up doing it.

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

View ldl's profile

ldl

1135 posts in 1110 days


#23 posted 02-03-2012 06:37 AM

Yes I will show it. I am in the final sanding stages and will finish up sanding probably tomorrow or Sat. Then I will cut it up and start assy. Should finish early next week barring any difficulties. Only thing is I just got my new Dewalt scroll saw set up so playing with it may slow me down Haaa Haaa.

-- Dewayne in Bainbridge, Ga. - - No one can make you mad. Only you decide when you get mad - -

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