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View Rayman24's profile

Best table saw under $650

by Rayman24
posted 912 days ago


40 replies so far

View ShaneA's profile

ShaneA

5201 posts in 1181 days


#1 posted 912 days ago

Welcome to LJs. I think in the new market you will find Ridgid contractor/hybrid saws are pretty well recieved. You may be able to use a Harbor Freight 20% off coupon at HD. Now matter what saw, a quality blade will make a huge difference. Happy hunting.

View BilltheDiver's profile

BilltheDiver

227 posts in 1468 days


#2 posted 912 days ago

When I was in a similar position I kept my eyes open and found a deal on an older Delta Unisaw with a Beismeyer fence. I have never regretted it since.

-- "Measure twice, cut once, count fingers"

View crank49's profile

crank49

3323 posts in 1554 days


#3 posted 912 days ago

Don’t waste your money. I have the Craftsman 21833, which is the same as the Ridgid 4512. I paid ~$450, including tax, and have regretted the purchase since.

I wish I had saved a little more and gotten something like the Steel city 35900.
Cast iron top, cast iron extensions, cabinet mounted trunion, 1.75 hp belt drive induction motor, riving knife.
It’s just south of $1000 which I know is more than you wanted, but it would be a lifetime tool that you won’t need to replace in a few years.

If I just had to have a saw and absolutely could not spend more than $650 I guess I’d go to Craigs list and get something older, but still well built like a Powermatic or Delta Unisaw.

OR, if mobility was an issue the Bosch jobsite portable sells for around $600 I think. It’s aluminum and has a noisy universal (with brushes) motor, but has standard miter slots and can run a dado blade. Gets good reviews. I just hate the thought of spending that kind of money on a portable saw myself.

-- Michael :-{| “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” ― A H

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

5350 posts in 1959 days


#4 posted 911 days ago

I’d definitely look to a full size saw with belt drive induction motor. Used is usually the best value if the right deal comes along, but if not, there are only a handful of new full size stationary saws available for < $650…Ridgid R4512 (~ $550), Craftsman 21833 (~ $550), Porter Cable PCB270TS (~ $599), and the Steel City 35900CS (Lowes – $619). At that price point, there’s usually at least one desirable feature that’s not included, like cast iron wings, upgraded fence, full enclosure, etc. While none are fantastic saws, all are capable of good service if set up well and fitted with a good blade, and all have their fair share of happy campers (as well as detractors). Most of these are fairly new models, released within the last 18 monthgs or so…I suspect the majority of issues you’ll read about are early manufacturing defects that eventually get worked out.

The PCB270TS has a plastic elevation gear that would be cause for me to look more closely at the others, plus the fence is nothing special.

The Steel City 35990 that was mentioned has cabinet mounted trunnions, and comes in a few variations 35990CS (stamped steel wings – $619), 35990C (cast iron wings – $727 online), 35990G (all granite top).

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2603 posts in 1633 days


#5 posted 911 days ago

The first table saw I purchased was a Powermatic 64a. I purchased it off a guy on Craigslist. It was in really good shape, came with the Powermatic mobile base, a plastic dust enclosure to seal the bottom, and a nice dado set. I think I used the saw more than he did during the short time I had it.

I sold the saw about 10-months ago and got a little more than I paid for it, plus I kept the dado set. I did have to drive quite a ways to get it and spent probably $50 on gas. It was totally worth it though. I paid the guy $450 for everything. Nice heavy setup for the price.

I’d second the comment above that no matter what saw you buy, make sure to put a good blade on it. I’d go with a good Freud blade at the minimum, a Tenryu (preferably Gold) or Forrest Woodworker. If you get a lower-powered saw, consider getting different blades for different uses (crosscutting vs. ripping), as a ripping blade will have fewer teeth and clear the shavings faster, or you could also consider a thin kerf blade as well.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View jeknow's profile

jeknow

7 posts in 957 days


#6 posted 911 days ago

I have a Craftsman 21833 and it’s been a good saw for the money. Nice and heavy no vibrations fence is good and average for the price. Where this saw is really good is its mobility I work in my garage and have to move the tools so the wife can park her car. But the bad thing is adjusting this saw to line up with the miter slots and in my opinion the down side to all hybred and contractor saws. You have to move the cast iron trunnuions in these type saws to line them up and this is not an easy or quick task. But in this price range it’s what you’ll end up with. I suggest moving up in price and getting a belt driven saw that you can alighn the tabe up on easier and buy a nice heavy duty mobile base, that’s my plan. Now that being said anyone got advise and or opinions on these type saws. Trying to keep around the $1400.00 to $1600.00 range. Oh and I got a Sears Craftsman 21833 for sale.

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2603 posts in 1633 days


#7 posted 911 days ago

jeknow, that is a good point regarding making adjustments. Adjusting most contractor-style table saws can be a bit time-consuming. An inexpensive addition is the PALS setup from In-Line Industries. For $20, it’s well worth it from everybody I’ve heard from. If I would’ve kept my PM64a, I would’ve gotten the PALS setup for it.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

5350 posts in 1959 days


#8 posted 911 days ago

Now that being said anyone got advise and or opinions on these type saws. Trying to keep around the $1400.00 to $1600.00 range.

Grizzly G1023RL – $1349 shipped:

Grizzly G0690 – $1475 shipped:

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View jeknow's profile

jeknow

7 posts in 957 days


#9 posted 911 days ago

Yes regarding the PALS I thought of those too but they don’t make them to fit the Craftsman saw, so that’s out on that model. And thanks for the Grizz. pics I’ve been looking at that one and a Jet model that Woodcraft sells. Do you own this saw? and what do you think? Sorry Rayman24 didn’t mean to hijak your forum maybe this will help both of us.

View jeknow's profile

jeknow

7 posts in 957 days


#10 posted 911 days ago

Well reagarding looking at the Jet saws I guess you’d have to throw anther $600.00 at that one

View Rayman24's profile

Rayman24

18 posts in 912 days


#11 posted 911 days ago

No hijak at all…I want to know all my options…I have recently started researching the Grizzly G0715P 10” Hybrid Table Saw, and the Steel City 35990C…similar price range but still under $800.00. As usual all options are welcome, as I will continue to do my research.

-- Rayman24

View jeknow's profile

jeknow

7 posts in 957 days


#12 posted 911 days ago

That’s cool and those are to good companys I have a Grizzly drill press, and drum sander, and a Steelcity bandsaw and have had no problem with either one. I think Grizzly has a better customer service division then Steelcity but hopefully you won’t need it. I just wanted you to be aware of the blade to miter adjustments on these type saws. But like Jonathan says they do make add on things to make it a little easier.

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

5350 posts in 1959 days


#13 posted 911 days ago

jeknow – I own neither of those particular models, but do own a 2008 Shop Fox W1677, which is a white version of the former G1023”SL” (pre-riving knife). It was a very popular model for a decade or so….now PM66 materials, but a great bang for the buck. The G0690 has a trunnion setup that’s most like the G1023SL and W1677. It’s been a great saw for me.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View cabmaker's profile

cabmaker

1279 posts in 1392 days


#14 posted 911 days ago

Sorry, there is not a best saw in that price range, that is new anyway. You better plan on used.

View Galt's profile

Galt

11 posts in 970 days


#15 posted 911 days ago

Through a curious series of events, I had to shoehorn myself into a shop that was only 5% the size of what I previously had. An unfortunate/fortunate effect of which was that I moved to a large Festool compatible workbench, along with their plunge saws, cutting guides and other tools. That was several years ago, and the more acclimated I become with their systems, the more sense it all starts to make. It is definitely not a replacement for the space and speed of a strong table saw with a nice big in-feed and out-feed, but it also gives me comparable results in less than a quarter of the space. Short of a Saw Stop, there’s also nothing as safe. Rather than trying to move the material past the blade you’re simply moving the blade past the material in a very controlled and contained fashion, and you get near total dust extraction. This last item is a real spoiler, and something I tend to take for granted, until I m reminded when visiting someone else’s shop. When clean up is juxtaposed to set up time, the two options become even more of a wash.

The space saving nature of that difference is quite huge, as well as being a lot more fat old fart friendly than humpin’ tons of melamine or MDF all day. I just slide my flat stacked sheet goods off of the back of the truck and onto my height adjusting, roll-around material cart. That rolls in and gets parked at one end of my cut table and all I’m lifting is ends and edges to slide from one to the other, not full sheets. It doesn’t take too many sheets to appreciate the difference. There is also much to be said for the difference versus trying to manipulate full sheets through a table saw blade accurately, when you haven’t really got all of the space that you need to operate safely. It’s not an especially inexpensive alternative, but with their plunge saws, guide rails, routers and HEPA dust extractors, I can build cabinets and casework anywhere.

I can stack and load enough tools to basically put a whole shop on the road in a couple three handtruck trips from shop to trailer. I’m retired now, so there’s not much call for that, but the capabilities are a wonderful trick to have in your pocket when ya need it. I used to keep a vertical panel saw, a left and a right tilt cabinet saw, plus a Bosch portable for install travel. The Festool set up is more space efficient than even the Bosch, by the time you allow for in-feed and out-feed, along with the stacking and storing of material going into and coming off of the saws. In terms of portability there’s no comparison at all. It’s not even remotely close.

All that said, they sure as heck ain’t cheap, but I’ve not regretted a penny of what I’ve spent (and I’d tell ya what that was, but my wife might stumble across this someday, and then it would all end up in my estate sale auction). There’s just something comfortable about being able to walk up to the table saw and commence any number of ingenious cuts in short order, even if it is in close proximity to the ever present danger of shortening digits. :)

-- “It is no coincidence that the century of total war coincided with the century of central banking.” - Dr. Ron Paul

View jeknow's profile

jeknow

7 posts in 957 days


#16 posted 911 days ago

Thanks Knotscott.

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

5350 posts in 1959 days


#17 posted 911 days ago

Sorry about the nasty typo (which I can no longer edit) ...meant to say ”not” PM66 material, but a good bang for the buck….

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View Rayman24's profile

Rayman24

18 posts in 912 days


#18 posted 911 days ago

Well I have narrowed my choices to the Steel City 35990C, and the Grizzly G0715P. Gonna spend a few days researching the exact pros and cons of both saws, then make my choice. Im definately open to suggestions between these to saws, or the opinions of others who might have experience with either of these makers.

As always you input and advice is welcome and appreciated!

-- Rayman24

View BentheViking's profile

BentheViking

1735 posts in 1147 days


#19 posted 910 days ago

I’d probably recommend trying to get a cabinet saw I think Grizzly makes one that is in that range or slightly more. You could also always go with the portable Bosch…thing is beautiful for a contractors saw

-- It's made of wood. Real sturdy.--Chubbs Peterson

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

5350 posts in 1959 days


#20 posted 910 days ago

To clarify for would-be buyers who aren’t sure, the Bosch is a portable jobsite saw. Contractor saws are full size belt drive saws with induction motors….usually cast iron. It can be confusing because portable jobsite saws are what the majority of contractors actually use in the field when a TS is needed.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View BentheViking's profile

BentheViking

1735 posts in 1147 days


#21 posted 910 days ago

my mistake scott…your right

-- It's made of wood. Real sturdy.--Chubbs Peterson

View Moron's profile

Moron

4666 posts in 2476 days


#22 posted 910 days ago

Buy used……….way better bang for the buck.

I’ve never owned a Grizzly but I recently did some work in a shop that had some nice tools and some “other” tools. The owner was/is an old friend from 30+ years ago. Way back then he bought a General 10” cabinet saw and still has it, still working like a top.

I’m just pointing out what I saw, and that is……….all his “grizzly” equipment has broken, been fixed, broken and fixed and a few pieces collect nothing but dust…….like I said, I state what I saw

You simply cannot buy a “good” TS for under a grand. Sure it will work perfect for a short time, but the more you use it, the greater the odds it will start to give you grief. With the economy the way it is, so many folks have to sell nice tools at bargain basement prices so why not buy used and never buy again.

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

View Howie's profile

Howie

2656 posts in 1506 days


#23 posted 909 days ago

You simply cannot buy a “good” TS for under a grand. Sure it will work perfect for a short time, but the more you use it, the greater the odds it will start to give you grief. With the economy
Moron, I have to disagree with you. I bought a new Ridgid 3650 7 years ago and it still hums along just fine. Haven’t had any trouble at all .

-- Life is good.

View Moron's profile

Moron

4666 posts in 2476 days


#24 posted 909 days ago

Howie, I’m not going to say that your wrong but I will say that much depends on how/what its used on. Just saying that the saw was never made to last a life time (like 30 years). If you were to run that saw, everyday, 5 days a week, for say 6 to 8 hours a day, ripping, dados, grooves on hardwood and composite wood products………they dont last.

using it to make birdhouses ( i love making birdhouses ), simply projects, casual once in awhile kind of things then buy all means, it will surely suffice

Always, my point is this. Why spend 600, 700, 800 on a big box store table saw when one could spend half that, and own a really good “used” cabinet tablesaw (retail 2 to 3K not to mention the add ons ) that will work flawlessly long after you and I are dead.

One of my brothers bought the Ridgid despite my advice. He’s in the reno business so it got a lot of use and 5 years later, he’s wishing he would have saved 400 bucks, bought a used contractors TS as his Ridgid is almost dead.

After 30 years of professional woodworking, I offer my advice, not to piss people off, rather to save them a few bucks, frustration and grief as I have made the mistakes already. That said, I really dont care what folks buy as its their money, and their choice : ))

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

View Howie's profile

Howie

2656 posts in 1506 days


#25 posted 909 days ago

Yeah, I bought a used 788 DeWalt Scroll saw, type 1. Supposed to be the best on the market unless you wanted to spend 1500. Lasted less than 6 weeks. Motor burnt up. New motor was as much as I paid for the saw. Went out and bought a PC for 180.00 and it works just fine. It gets a lot of use as my nephews like to cut out animals etc on it. If it blows up I can buy at least 7 more new ones.
If anyone looks at my projects they will see I manage to build other things besides birdhouses. I’m retired and in my shop almost everyday. I have Ridgid TS,Ridgid DP,Ridgid Jointer,Ridgid MS ,Ridgid OS, Ridgid Oscillating Sander among other brands in my shop. The only thing I’ve had a problem with was the 5”OS that warranty fixed.
The point I’m trying to make is that cost is not always a good indicator and same can be said for brands. You get a good one or you can get a bad one in anything.

-- Life is good.

View medicnurse70's profile

medicnurse70

13 posts in 1988 days


#26 posted 909 days ago

I have a Bosch and a Steel City…. It is a toss up… for small things that you mentioned the Bosch hands down… an incredible saw !!!!

View doncutlip's profile

doncutlip

2832 posts in 2139 days


#27 posted 909 days ago

I have the G0690 and love it

-- Don, Royersford, PA

View toolie's profile

toolie

1713 posts in 1211 days


#28 posted 909 days ago

“Well I have narrowed my choices to the Steel City 35990C, and the Grizzly G0715P.”

well, at least rayman24 isn’t going to fall for those premium priced, underperforming TSs from the WMH tool group (jet and powermatic). long on promise, short on delivery annd overpriced. either of the TSs rayman is focusing on should serve him well for many years. my 2 cheap, old, emerson built 10” CI contractor TSs have handled everything i’ve thrown at them, provided i used the appropriate blade, the importance of which cannot be overestimated.

regarding the 2 subject saws, the 35990C is like the discontinued ridgid 4511 with a CI top, cabinet mounted trunions for ease of blade parallelism adjusting, built in mobile base but a 1.75hp motor and a fence that received a lot of negative comments on the ridgid forum. the 715P has a one piece (better) front fence rail and fence, no mobile base, a 2 hp motor and table mounted trunions. i saw the 359990s fence on a ridgid 4511 and was really, really unimpressed. for the right price, though, one could buy the 35990 and a delta t2 fence for ~$150 and the total cost would still be slightly below the 715P, and, except for .25hp, would probably be a more functional saw.

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

5350 posts in 1959 days


#29 posted 909 days ago

Moron – The term “good” is a variable that’s defined differently by different people depending on their needs. YOU may not be able to get a “good” saw for under a grand, but a lot of us can, and have. I have no argument that an old Unisaw or PM66 are more robustly made saws than one from a big box store, but many folks just can’t go out on Friday afternoon and buy a $450 PM66 whenever they’re ready.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View Galt's profile

Galt

11 posts in 970 days


#30 posted 909 days ago

My B-I-L just picked up a 10” Delta 3 hp Unisaw with 52” Biesemeyer Fence, Excalibur Over Arm Guard, Mobile Base, Delta Tenoning Jig, Miter Gauge & Clamp, (3) Forrest Carbide blades, and a 10” Forrest stacking dado set. The saw is probably about 6-7 years old, and he paid $1,200 to the seller for what was close to $5,000 worth of tooling when new. Not too shabby, but that ain’t all.

The $1,200 also paid for a 3 hp Delta Shaper w/ three large tool boxes filled with bits, a nice roller base, (3) 1-1/2 hp Delta Dust Collectors, and an older Grizzly 18” re-saw band saw with (4) 1” re-saw blades, roller base and light. Everything looks great, and after a little cleaning, lubricating and tuning it all runs great. We spent about a day of the two of us loading and unloading, hauling, cleaning and tuning. I don’t know how to equate the end result with anything that H.D. or Lowes sells ‘cuz it’s absolutely apples to howitzers.

He could easily sell off the cleaned up shaper and bits for what he spent, leaving him with a fully equipped table saw, the dust collectors and a band saw for the cost of our time for the day. Ditto wha’ Moron said.

-- “It is no coincidence that the century of total war coincided with the century of central banking.” - Dr. Ron Paul

View Loren's profile

Loren

7151 posts in 2231 days


#31 posted 909 days ago

Galt may have a point. If you eliminate the table saw as a tool
for breaking down large sheets and use a track saw instead ($300
or so with Eurekazone basic system), then the table saw becomes
not a central space-hog, but a machine for making joints, precision
cross cuts and quick rips in smaller pieces of wood. A not-very
fancy used contractor or (better yet, imo) used tilt-table saw
becomes your precision joinery and squaring saw while the big
cuts are done by bringing the tool to the work with a GCS (guided
circular saw system).

Solid woods are better ripped on a bandsaw and I usually crosscut
rough boards even today with a circular saw. It’s just quicker to
take the saw outside where the boards are, mark them for
rough crosscutting, and cut them using a square held with one
hand and the saw in the other. Even though I have a sliding table
saw, wrestling a 10’ board across it to make a cut that is a rough
cut anyway is not worth the trouble.

If you have a slide-compound miter saw or radial arm saw of
course you can make rough boards, but such setups consume the
entire length of one wall of a typical 20×20 garage shop and
there’s the expense as well.

.... and then of course, if you break up 4×8 sheets on a table
saw pulled back muscles are an inevitable cost. I’ve been doing
this for a long time now and unless I am ripping a full sheet in
half lengthwise I almost never put one on the table saw and
even then there is usually stuff that needs to be moved
and outfeed stands to set up.

View crashn's profile

crashn

517 posts in 1048 days


#32 posted 909 days ago

I have the grizzly 715P and really like it. Granted, I’m only a beginner, but it takes everything I put past it. 8/4 hard oak is the largest. I used the stock blade. It sucked. Got a new Forrest Woodworker for XMAS, the .100 kerf and LOVE IT. Just resawed some 4/4 (more like 1 1/8, found the fatty’s in the pile) and it was nearly like it just came out of the planer. I got a nice 1/2 inch piece and a fat 3/8 board from the 4/4, and that was after I jointed and planed it.

-- Crashn - the only thing I make more of than sawdust is mistakes

View Howie's profile

Howie

2656 posts in 1506 days


#33 posted 909 days ago

@doncutlip, you’re killing me. That’s the saw I intend to buy when my trusty 3650 rolls over and dies.

-- Life is good.

View crashn's profile

crashn

517 posts in 1048 days


#34 posted 909 days ago

I would have gotten the 690, but did not have 220v in the detached garage at the time. I have since had the house panel and electrical entrance replaced in my old 1940’s house, and dug and installed 220 to the garage. I converted the Grizzly 0715 to 110v when I got it, getting ready to change it back to 220. Tell you though, when I was running on the old cruddy circuit, the saw took a second or 2 to come to speed. With the new 60amp circuit to the garage, the saw starts and hums straight away!

-- Crashn - the only thing I make more of than sawdust is mistakes

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

3201 posts in 1396 days


#35 posted 909 days ago

I like the Jet contractor saws with an exacta II fence. Many have cast iron wings, and can make 32” rip cuts. The arbor nut is plenty long to accept a 7/8” dado set. It is a nice saw that can be had used for $350-500. With a thin kerf ripping blade I can cut 8/4 white oak without any trouble.
Good luck!

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View jordanusmc's profile

jordanusmc

42 posts in 996 days


#36 posted 909 days ago

I was wondering what ya’ll thought about the Ridgid RA51210. I was looking at picking a TS used from CL however after felling lead astray by an add that was less than accurate (Knottscot, Bertha, and Dmorrison pointed out that it was not the correct model and that there were some flaws in the ad) I have decided to go with a new TS. I liked the idea that the Ridgid comes with a lifetime warranty for the cost to replace any parts and such. I thought this was a prime example of a company standing behind there name. I know that the Ridgid wont have all of the thrills that some other brands have, but I feel like for a entry saw it is a pretty good option.

View Moron's profile

Moron

4666 posts in 2476 days


#37 posted 909 days ago

I stole this one, or at least what I paid for it….felt like I stole it : ))

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

View toolie's profile

toolie

1713 posts in 1211 days


#38 posted 909 days ago

jordanusmc…ridgid does not offer a lifteime warranty on . it offers a 3 year warranty from the date of purchase and original owner may register the tool for ridgid’s Lifetime Service Agreement (LSA). this program provides free parts and labor for covered repairs for the life of the tool. however, should the tool owner forget to properly register the tool, coverage expires after 3 years. while the 4512 is a good entry level saw, the fence system has received several negative comments on the ridgid forum due to it’s 2 piece front rail. one 4512 owner even replaced the stock fence system with a fence system from the 4512’s 2 generation predecessor, the 36650/60.

https://www.ridgidforum.com/forum/t36151/

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

View jordanusmc's profile

jordanusmc

42 posts in 996 days


#39 posted 909 days ago

Toolie thank you for the clarification on the warranty. I had read that earlier but failed to spell it out correct in my earlier post. The fact that it dose not transfer to the second owner is another reason why I was leaning towards a new one as opposed to a used one. Thanks for the link to the Ridgid forum I will have to read up on some stuff.

View Stillhave10fingers's profile

Stillhave10fingers

6 posts in 1045 days


#40 posted 909 days ago

As you can see from the picture, I have a Ridgid r4510. It was chosed because my “shop” is so small I can’t leave a saw permanently setup. Suffice to say, though, It was 98% dead on accurate right out of the box. I bought a set of good quality Freud blades for it. I went through the alignment processes I learned here on LJ’s (thanks LJ’ers) to verify and improve accuracy. Added a zero clearance insert. Also added an Incra 1000HD miter fence and the Incra miter Express. It also serves as a disk sander. The only two areas that are of slight concern are table size ( I have to use saw horses on the left and outfeed sides for more support) and arbor length. The arbor is too short to use a full 3/4 inch dado stack. However, I am using an 8 inch dado set and have no problems with power or wobble. Overall, for my purposes, this saw is amazing. I’m building a whole new set of kitchen cabinets (both upper and lower) and a new walk-in closet shelving system. Would I have bought a bigger saw if I had the space? Absolutely. But bang for the buck, this saw is a pleasure to use.

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