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All Replies on DeWalt DW735 Planer - What Am I Doing Wrong?

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DeWalt DW735 Planer - What Am I Doing Wrong?

by oldwoodsale
posted 949 days ago


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54 replies

54 replies so far

View ShaneA's profile

ShaneA

5245 posts in 1195 days


#1 posted 949 days ago

When it gets colder, the rollers tend to grip less and are effected by dust and debris. Raise the machine and clean table and rollers, and then give it a try.

View Tim Dahn's profile

Tim Dahn

1460 posts in 2162 days


#2 posted 949 days ago

Do you have in-feed and out-feed tables? If so, are they properly adjusted?
Also wax the table.

-- Good judgement comes from experience and experience comes from poor judgement.

View ajosephg's profile

ajosephg

1840 posts in 2158 days


#3 posted 949 days ago

It seems to me that old wood gets harder and harder making it more difficult to machine.

Assuming that your rollers are turning the only corrective action I can think of is to clean the rollers and wax the table. I think rubbing alcohol works, but check your users manual first, and be careful you don’t cut yourself.

Edit: I just thought of something else I’ve heard of. Get a spray bottle and lightly spray the top surface of the board with water.

-- Joe

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

6914 posts in 1511 days


#4 posted 949 days ago

FWIW, I use isopropyl alcohol to clean the rollers on my 13in Ridgid planer and that helps a lot. Just remember to unplug the machine any time you are reaching in there. ;-)

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View HerbC's profile

HerbC

1154 posts in 1456 days


#5 posted 949 days ago

Get some SlickStrips material and coat the bed of the planer with it. That will greatly reduce the friction between the lumber and the planer bed and should help a lot. I have noticed though that the lunchbox portable planers can’t effectively take a very big bite each pass.

Be Careful!

Herb

-- Herb, Florida - Here's why I close most messages with "Be Careful!" http://lumberjocks.com/HerbC/blog/17090

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

1638 posts in 1519 days


#6 posted 949 days ago

I also have that planer…....wax the bed!

-- In God We Trust

View lew's profile

lew

9938 posts in 2352 days


#7 posted 949 days ago

Ditto what Jim said.

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1066 posts in 1073 days


#8 posted 949 days ago

Wax often!

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT15 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln

View lenb's profile

lenb

49 posts in 949 days


#9 posted 949 days ago

I also purchased that model planer and I was IMPRESSED WITH ITS PERFORMANCE
HOwever it was short lived as I also am pushing tne boards through, so I took the blades and the board to the dealer and all he could see was the edge is gone of the blades !!!dah They have only done several short boards!!! All he could suggest was a new set, I think they sell the machine with very poor quality blades and as I was leaving they tryed to sell me a higher quality blade. So I will get these sharpened but \Ithink I will have to spend another $100.00 or so on good blades !!

-- Profile photo is of our big 50th celebration, What a great day that was, July 2011

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

10538 posts in 1287 days


#10 posted 949 days ago

Old/ reclaimed wood that is dirty will kill planer blades very quickly as the dirt is really grit just like sandpaper. I try to always wire brush and then blow clean with an air gun. A pain but it beats trashing blades. I have heard others say that the standard DeWalt planer blades were poor quality???

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View oldwoodsale's profile

oldwoodsale

21 posts in 1571 days


#11 posted 949 days ago

Thanks for all the quick replies! I’ll try the cleaning and wax as suggested. Does it seem strange to anyone that this common problem exists in the first place? I examined the rollers and they are 99% clean. Just very minor pieces of dust. I may have to reconsider this unit as I have very long pieces 13’ that may dirty the rollers half way through the piece. I’ll be doing more cleaning than wood working?

View juniorjock's profile

juniorjock

1930 posts in 2362 days


#12 posted 949 days ago

Clean the rollers…..that’s all there is to it. . . . . and you’ll probably have to do it again, and again…. and….

edit: one of those micro-fiber cloths work great.

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

10538 posts in 1287 days


#13 posted 949 days ago

Dirty rollers doesn’t sound right unless DeWalts are special. I have planed MILES of lumber with my Ridgid and never cleaned the rollers (and no problems so far).

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View ShaneA's profile

ShaneA

5245 posts in 1195 days


#14 posted 949 days ago

The blades are reverseable, so you can flip them before buying a new set. This has only happened to me in the winter, low temp and low humidity will adversely effect the grip of the rubber. The planer should be fine.

View cam1297's profile

cam1297

64 posts in 1808 days


#15 posted 949 days ago

Having long boards and a short planer bed may cause the jam. try supporting the board on the infeed past 1/2 way then switch.

View ajosephg's profile

ajosephg

1840 posts in 2158 days


#16 posted 949 days ago

I have planed hundreds if not thousands board feet with my Dewalt 735 and am still on the second side of the original set of blades, and I have never had to clean the rollers. I do wax the bed once in awhile. Wood planed includes walnut, cherry, cedar, and some poplar.

-- Joe

View TCCcabinetmaker's profile

TCCcabinetmaker

925 posts in 951 days


#17 posted 949 days ago

It may also be important to know what kind of oak you are running, though it’s unlikely that you have it, live oak can petrify a few months after it is cut down. The real reason ship builders started appearing in the states is that the English were using live oak for their ships. When they shipped the wood back, it would petrify on the trip, making it nearly impossible to work. SO they sent over ship builders to rough out the parts before shipping back to England.

But anyways, the real problem is more likely the blades. Oak is a tough material, and especially older oak, will wear the knives down faster, being that they aren’t made from the same carbide as industrial planer knives they will wear faster.

invest in a small diamond sharpening stone from one of the box stores, you know the kind that look like butterfly knives? Use these to hone the blades while in the machine, you may get a little more life out of those blades.

If this doesn’t solve the problem, we can look at your infeed/outfeed bars assuming that model has them, and see if they are set correctly.

-- The mark of a good carpenter is not how few mistakes he makes, but rather how well he fixes them.

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

3264 posts in 1410 days


#18 posted 949 days ago

1+ for waxing bed with a paste wax.
Clean feed rollers with mineral spirits.
My 735 has hung up on poorly cut material once in a while. If the difference in thickness is greater than 1/8” from one end to the other, this can be a problem. I just start from the thin end, and set it for a very light cut.
That said, the single most common reason for feed problems is dull blades. I have inspected blades that looked clean and free of nicks. Nevertheless, when I changed them the machine worked well again. Dull blades don’t look much different than sharp ones. If all else fails, flip the reversible blades.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View oldwoodsale's profile

oldwoodsale

21 posts in 1571 days


#19 posted 948 days ago

Hi Guys…Fantastic replies…really appreciate it! In looking at all the replies it seems some have this problem and some rarely have it. I particularly note a few have had this problem in the winter when it is cold. I took the planer from my warm basement to the 37degree garage. The wood was also cold. It took about 15min for the problem to start which may have been enough time to cool the rubber rollers and reduce their gripping ability.I turned on the heat in the garage last night to warm everything up. Will let you know if this improves the operation. Thanks again. Keith

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

6914 posts in 1511 days


#20 posted 948 days ago

I originally built this planer table for a large/long project. I was actually able to plane the 3in X 12in X 90in White Ash laminated tops of my project with this planer, HOWEVER:

++ I did have to help with the feeding.

++ I had long infeed/outfeed ramps (and waxed them along with the planer bed/ramps)

++ The planer rollers were NOT strong enough to overcome the resistance/friction from those long feed ramps. Having long “adjustable” roller ramps MIGHT (no guarantees here) make it a hands free feed, but I just don’t know. BTW, what I was feeding weighed in the neighborhood of 100lb. apiece.

++ I got by by assisting/pushing and then pulling these big boards through this tiny planer.

Bottom line: I think we need to accurately adjust our thinking as to what these planers can and cannot do, or buy a larger, more capable, more expensive planer. I still love mine, but I do respect its limits.
Just my 2-cents…

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View Cato's profile

Cato

641 posts in 1909 days


#21 posted 948 days ago

You did not mention whether you are jointing your boards before running through the planer. I always joint one side flat, then run through the planer to flatten the other one.

I’ve had my 735 for over a year and no feeding problems at all. I do wax the bed and run mostly hardwood through it, long and short pieces. Never had to clean the rollers and it is finally time to flip the blades.

I also brush every board with a wire brush prior to planing.

My garage is heated and cooled and that may make a big difference.

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

15650 posts in 2815 days


#22 posted 948 days ago

I have had the exact same problem when planing some old oak. The solution was, as many others have suggested, to wax the bed. It seems odd because it will still feel so smooth to the touch, but a fresh coat of wax will have those boards feeding properly again.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View SteveKorz's profile

SteveKorz

2130 posts in 2311 days


#23 posted 948 days ago

I agree with gfadvm… Old barn lumber is really dirty, and if you don’t wire brush it and blow it off with compressed air, you will kill those planer blades in one or two boards.

-- As iron sharpens iron, so one man sharpens another. (Proverbs 27:17) †

View mrg's profile

mrg

519 posts in 1596 days


#24 posted 948 days ago

Just planing down some maple and the second pass she just wouldn’t go.shut it down and grabbed my Bostic Top Coat and she is good to go.

-- mrg

View Howie's profile

Howie

2656 posts in 1520 days


#25 posted 948 days ago

Pull the top off your planner and make sure it isn’t filling with sawdust. If the lumber is the least bit damp it will tend to build up even with a good d/c. Clean the rollers and wax the bottoms. I’ve been using my 735 for 5 years and that’s all I ever have to do to it.

-- Life is good.

View SnowyRiver's profile

SnowyRiver

51451 posts in 2077 days


#26 posted 948 days ago

Like many have said, wax the table…this will take care of your problem. The resin from the wood builds up on the table and causes the wood to drag. You often can feel the sticky resin if you turn off the power, raise the cutters, and run your fingers over the bed…it will seem dry and sticky. I use a good automotive paste wax.

-- Wayne - Plymouth MN

View MoshupTrail's profile

MoshupTrail

287 posts in 1077 days


#27 posted 948 days ago

Old oak gets VERY hard. Have you tried a different species of wood in between the oak planks – as a way to test sharpness of the blades. I find oak dulls the blades in my Ridgid pretty quickly, and a knot can take a chunk out of the blade leaving a little line in subsequent boards. I’ve had my Ridgid bog down like that when I was taking too much from a wide board. For 12” wide boards I only take 1/64th at a pass!

-- Some problems are best solved with an optimistic approach. Optimism shines a light on alternatives that are otherwise not visible.

View ScotttheSurveyor's profile

ScotttheSurveyor

31 posts in 948 days


#28 posted 948 days ago

I’m new here and am going to get a 735 for Christmas(I hope)
What wax to use? Thanks for all the posts and help

-- Angular error is proportionate to the distance run

View SnowyRiver's profile

SnowyRiver

51451 posts in 2077 days


#29 posted 948 days ago

I use Meguiars past wax on my truck and boat so thats what I use on the table. I am sure other auto waxs will work too. Just be sure to completely buff it off so it doesnt get into the wood, otherwise you could have finish problems.

-- Wayne - Plymouth MN

View oldwoodsale's profile

oldwoodsale

21 posts in 1571 days


#30 posted 947 days ago

Here is the progress: Heated the garage to 70+Degrees and let the planer warm up. Put in a piece of oak with the blades backed off so there was no cut going on and the piece hung up. So a cold garage is not the total problem. Shut it down and cleaned the rollers with windex. Could not see a lot come off on the paper towel but there was a small amount of dirt. After that I planed at least 7 more boards. One was 8” wide and it had no problem doing multiple passes. Once the oak is planed it is so smooth, I raised the cutter head and just pushed the board across the table and there is a surprising amount of resistance. The wax will be the next step. Should have my Christmas project done in time! Making a bread box, will post some photos when done. Thanks for the help!

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1290 days


#31 posted 947 days ago

Mine has done this before. Spring for the infeed/outfeed and keep everything well waxed. They’ve come down a lot in price and I think they’ve <$100 for the pair on Amazon. Horizontal’s got it on the head, at least for my machine. You’ve got to get that resinous crap off you’re wheels every so once in a while to make them “sticky”. I missed the part about whether they’d been over the jointer yet. I’ve had a slightly twisted board jam up in my 735. Good luck.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View Jeff in Huntersville's profile

Jeff in Huntersville

398 posts in 1791 days


#32 posted 947 days ago

Many automotive waxes contain silicone which, if transferred to the wood, will cause you problems later on in finishing. I use plain old Johnson’s paste wax. It’s cheap and does the job.

View SnowyRiver's profile

SnowyRiver

51451 posts in 2077 days


#33 posted 947 days ago

I have heard that about silica too, although for all the years I have used a planer, I have always used automotive wax since it really cuts the resin and I dont have to wax as often. I also use it on my table saw, jointer, and bandsaw table too. I have never had a problem with it and finishing. I know its hard to tell on the wax can if it has silica since they dont often say, but many probably do to remove the grime from the car finish…like a rubbing compound. I often wondered if just something like spray on Pledge for dusting would work. I often use that on the impellers of my snow thrower since it works well to keep the ice and snow from sticking to the impeller.

-- Wayne - Plymouth MN

View ajosephg's profile

ajosephg

1840 posts in 2158 days


#34 posted 947 days ago

Excuse me, while I put on my teaching hat.

Silica and silicon are not the same as silicone.

Silicon is a chemical element and is commonly used in semiconductors. It does not exist alone in nature.

Silica is silicon dioxide and is commonly found in sand, hence it’s use in abrasive such as sand paper, rubbing compound, etc.

Silicone is a synthetic polymer and is commonly used in plastics and lubricants. The same properties that makes Silicone a good lubricant, furniture polish, etc. is why it is not compatible with wood finishes. Nothing will stick to it.

This link explains it well: http://cti.itc.virginia.edu/~meg3c/ethics/cases/dcc/dccpart2.html

-- Joe

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1290 days


#35 posted 947 days ago

You don’t want to breath silica. You’ll get pulmonary fibrosis. If you’re one of the rare few that are going to add finish straight off the planer, then any waxy/oily transfer will give you finish irregularities. I wax my beds with clear shoe polish. It’s probably terrible to transfer to my wood, lol; however, I know I’ll handplane it off the planer, so I don’t worry too much about it.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View lenb's profile

lenb

49 posts in 949 days


#36 posted 947 days ago

i am the fellow that complained about the poor quality Dewald blades, how ever I took the advice to wax my base and I touched up the blades and ran some cherry through and I am totaly amzed at the difference, I am over whelmed.
Thank you so much Lumber jocks. I will keep my wax close by, the base was sticky.
Len

-- Profile photo is of our big 50th celebration, What a great day that was, July 2011

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1290 days


#37 posted 947 days ago

^Also LenB, there are vastly better blades available for the 735. I’ve been really happy with jointer blades from Global Tooling. I have no reason to think the planer blades wouldn’t be equally as good. As an idea of pricing, the three-knife set for my PM jointer cost me less than $15, lol;) Good luck!

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View ScotttheSurveyor's profile

ScotttheSurveyor

31 posts in 948 days


#38 posted 945 days ago

BIG box under the tree today. keep your fingers crossed for me.

-- Angular error is proportionate to the distance run

View 404 - Not Found's profile

404 - Not Found

2544 posts in 1566 days


#39 posted 945 days ago

There’s a product called Waxilit made by Metabo (Elektra Beckum) which is sold as an anti seize planer paste. A tin the size of a shoe polish can has lasted me 5 years.
Just curious, are those reversible knives HSS or TC, If they are HSS they are only suitable for softwoods. (Allegedly).

View Dan's profile

Dan

45 posts in 934 days


#40 posted 934 days ago

I have the same problem here and in a heated building and all boards were clean Air Dryed Red Oak ; pre-jointed, i still have to push and pull the boads through it, and rerun the final pass twice to remove the skip marks !!! ahww!! but they were 10 inches wide and only remove 1/64 for the final passes.. I also have the 733 that never required any maintenance and is a single speed, 2 blade system… I will try the sprits water bottle to help the grip from the too smooth finish. That may be its own enemy is that is is too slick of a finish to grip and its a great finish too, except for the skipping marks : )
Ps, my shop is humidity controled at 45% RH and the other obsevation is the bigger machines use a serrated feed roller, not rubbber.
I hope it improves and i will reply back on it. Thanks to all for the tips here.

-- Dan Stine, Galion Ohio

View Dan's profile

Dan

45 posts in 934 days


#41 posted 934 days ago

Bostic Top Coat or a teflon ptfe or Carnuba funituer wax only!!! never Silicone; that component will track every where in your shop and on your projects too, not to mention trace amounts on the feed rollers and cause even more slipping.
Joe has it 100% on the silcone vs slica and silicon

-- Dan Stine, Galion Ohio

View oldwoodsale's profile

oldwoodsale

21 posts in 1571 days


#42 posted 934 days ago

Hey guys, thanks again for all the info. My project using the planer is done. It is a triple Bread, Onion, Potato bin. The oak is 120 years old from an old whiskey ageing house. The copper behind the handles is from Stoney’s brewery in Smithton, PA. My Aunt worked there till they closed. She got a small wedge of copper from the kettle as a memento. It seemed like a good use for it. I hand hammered it to give it some texture. The copper inset of the barn is sheet copper, I sand blasted it and then brushed it to give it texture. The bin went over very well for Christmas. At the end of this project I have come to the conclusion that the DW735 is just too small for a large oak board. By large I mean +6in and that is pushing it. I will be on the hunt for a used old cast unit with a helical cutter with carbide inserts. If anyone has suggestions on old units that can handle 12” 120 yr old oak please let me know. I can also handle 3ph units around 5hp max. I will probably wind up selling the Dewalt. I will chalk it up to a learning experience.Photobucket

View DannyB's profile

DannyB

46 posts in 2018 days


#43 posted 934 days ago

I’ve planed 12/4 10” wide non-120 year old oak on the dw735 with no issue, so it’s really not “too small” in general. You can even get a carbide insert helical head for the DW735 (which is what I have in mine).

Have you tried other lumber yet? Someone asked above, but i didn’t see any reply where you answered :)

View SnowyRiver's profile

SnowyRiver

51451 posts in 2077 days


#44 posted 933 days ago

I agree with DannyB. I still have the regular OEM knives in mine and I have planed countless oak boards over 6 inches in width with my 735. I have planed a lot of glued up oak boards the same width as the planer with no problems. If you keep the table waxed and dont cut too much off with each pass, they should slide right through.

Hey Danny, where did you get the helical head?

-- Wayne - Plymouth MN

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8476 posts in 2245 days


#45 posted 933 days ago

wax the bed, clean the rollers.

also when it gets cold the rubber on the rollers start to harden up making them slip and not grab the boards well. waxing the bed helps with this as the rollers need to work less hard, but may still not be enough – you may need to heat the area depending on temperatures in shop.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View DannyB's profile

DannyB

46 posts in 2018 days


#46 posted 933 days ago

Hey Wayne,
Byrd tool (who also makes the helical heads for powermatics) make one for the DW735.
The best place I found to get it is holbren.com (see http://www.holbren.com/dewalt/).
They are expensive compared to the price of the machine, but not compared to the price of other 13” helical cutterheads.

That is, it would cost you at least as much to outfit any 13 inch planer with a shelix head.
There are also 10% discount codes for holbren for members of various woodworking forums.

The main difference between this and normal insert cutterheads is that these inserts are shapes and set in a way to cut at a shear. I don’t even pay attention to grain direction anymore when planing, it just doesn’t matter. It’s fairly amazing.

The one downside is that while the surface is glassy smooth, they leave very light scallops (about 0.001 inch deep) because it’s not possible to cut perfectly flat with a radiused cutter :)
I always sand after planing, so for me it doesn’t matter because they disappear almost instantly at p180 grit or below.

Anyway, it was a worthwhile upgrade for me, given the cost of knives vs how quickly i was going through them + the time it saved me.

Installation requires a more work than a regular planer, but nothing hard. I’m not a “take apart machines” kind of guy and it still only took me an hour.

There are 2 other companies i know of that make insert heads for the DW735, but only byrd uses carbide inserts, AFAIK.

View stevenmadden's profile

stevenmadden

174 posts in 1686 days


#47 posted 933 days ago

DillingerWhiskey: I have not read every post, but it seems to me that you are not following the simplest (and most often cited) advice. Wax the planer bed, problem will be solved. I have this planer and it works great. I only wax every once in a while, no other maintenance required.

I sure hate to see you go through all the trouble of selling this unit and trying to find a better one, especially since this model is the best in it’s class.

Good luck, and congratulations on the beautiful project.

Steven

View SnowyRiver's profile

SnowyRiver

51451 posts in 2077 days


#48 posted 932 days ago

Thanks Danny, I appreicate the info. I will certainly look into it.

-- Wayne - Plymouth MN

View Peter Oxley's profile

Peter Oxley

1426 posts in 2471 days


#49 posted 932 days ago

Just agreeing with what a lot of people have already said … every time mine starts slipping, I clean the feed rollers and wax the bed.

-- http://www.peteroxley.com -- http://north40studios.etsy.com --

View DannyB's profile

DannyB

46 posts in 2018 days


#50 posted 932 days ago

By the way, one thing i haven’t seen suggested is that the maximum thickness of board is more than you think.

That is, maybe you are setting it for a thickness based on the front of the board, and the middle of the board is 1/8” or 1/4” thicker than that.
You said this is rough cut stuff you cut down, so this is entirely possible.

That would definitely jam the rollers.

Did you actually measure the thickness at the front vs the part it seems to be jamming on?

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