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What hand to plane to buy first?

by BerBer5985
posted 10-11-2011 03:23 AM


49 replies so far

View Chelios's profile

Chelios

567 posts in 1723 days


#1 posted 10-11-2011 03:30 AM

Buy a restored/sharpened/fettled #5 or #6 vintage Stanley off e-bay. You will spend about $40. This will give you a flavor for a good handplane without spending all the money. If money is no object then go for Lie Nielsen or veritas.

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Chelios

567 posts in 1723 days


#2 posted 10-11-2011 03:34 AM

Here is the text for a 5 1/2 that is selling on ebay

A beautiful Stanley/Bailey 5 1/2 corrugated plane with a rust and pit free base and finish baked on. The base has been lapped flat using diamond plate and different grits of sand paper on plate glass. The base has three patent dates; the last being APR/19/10. The rosewood knob & rosewood tote have been refinished and have very nice gain and color. The full-length “Stanley Sweetheart” logo blade and chip breaker have no rust and the blade has been sharpened scary sharp using diamond plate and Japanese wet stones at 25 degrees. The frog has the small brass depth adjusting wheel. The Stanley key hole lever cap is smooth to the touch and has no edge problems. Overall, this plane is tuned and shop ready.

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8476 posts in 2306 days


#3 posted 10-11-2011 03:36 AM

a #5 is the jack of all trades, its small and light enough and can be set to smooth surfaces and it is long enough to kinda to jointing and flattening of surfaces (although compared to a #7 you would have to do more manual work and check surfaces for flat more often). older stanleys are good candidates as they are not too expensive.

mind you, LN LV Stanley or anything else – you will also have to develop sharpening skills or hand planing will seem very unfriendly and can become a hassle real fast. with a good setup and sharp tool it’s a pleasure to work though.

With that said – I would suggest getting a dedicated smoother #4 and a dedicated jointer #7 so that you’ll spend less time fiddling with changing the setting on a #5 and just have 1 plane setup properly and ready to work. initial cost will be higher but you’ll get to work WITH the planes more than work ON them that way.

-- 抍 When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

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knotscott

5471 posts in 2033 days


#4 posted 10-11-2011 04:16 AM

A good used #5 or 5-1/2 would do nicely. To improve your chances of finding a good one, I’d expand the short list to include Record, Millers Falls (#14), Sargent VBM, Union, Winchester, and Keen Kutter.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View Arminius's profile

Arminius

304 posts in 2461 days


#5 posted 10-11-2011 05:01 AM

If you have to do everything with one plane, it is basically impossible to beat the Low Angle Jacks.

Lie-Nielsen

Veritas

With the alternative blades, you can do almost everything. The vintage approach is good too, and would be a great way to start to build out more focused tools. I personally prefer and purchased the Veritas on every measure except aesthetic – I have come dang close to buying the L-N just because I want one so badly.

View rimfire7891's profile

rimfire7891

123 posts in 1560 days


#6 posted 10-11-2011 05:19 AM

If there was only one choice. The block plane we be my first pick.
Really depends what you are doing, however the block plane is the work horse in my shop.
Don’t have spend much to get something that works. The LN bronzes are pocket ready and easy to keep sharp.
Get a replacement iron for a Stanley ( Hock) and bit of a tune-up and you are ready to go.

Thanks jb

-- Playing with wood and metal for the last 50 years, driving and building Land Cruisers for the last 40. Experience is what you get when you don't know what you are doing.

View paratrooper34's profile

paratrooper34

760 posts in 1609 days


#7 posted 10-11-2011 01:07 PM

I agree with the other posters, a #5 type plane can do a lot. You can joint with it, but I would not use it for longish boards. It can smooth if you tune it for that. It excels at fast stock removal when dimensioning lumber. I use a #5 type on my shooting board, perfect balance for size and weight.

Since the $275 for a Veritas plane keeps you from buying it, yet you want quality, I suggest any of the planes suggested above. I would also suggest buying a blade for each operation you want to perform with the plane as a smooth plane blade is done up differently than a jointer plane blade and one you would use for rapid stock removal.

But, if you want to get into using handplanes, you MUST have a method to sharpen the blades. You will have a horrible experience if you try to use a handplane with a dull blade. They also require some tuning, even the high end LNs and such require tuning when you get them from the manufacturer. Take the time to read up and understand how to tune, sharpen, and use handplanes which will result in a positive experience for you.

Good Luck and welcome to the world of handplanes!!!

-- Mike

View pariswoodworking's profile

pariswoodworking

380 posts in 1142 days


#8 posted 10-11-2011 03:47 PM

I would go (and did go) with a good old Stanley No. 5 for your first general use plane. If your wanting a jointing plane, a Stanley No. 7 is pretty good too.

-- Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not sure about the former. -- Albert Einstein

View cellophane's profile

cellophane

42 posts in 1166 days


#9 posted 10-11-2011 04:41 PM

A good used #5 or 5-1/2 would do nicely. To improve your chances of finding a good one, Iā€™d expand the short list to include Record, Millers Falls (#14), Sargent VBM, Union, Winchester, and Keen Kutter.

I have a MF 14 that I like a little more than my Stanley #5. I find the handle to be more comfortable. It also cost a lot less ($12 shipped vs $30 shipped.) If you look at Keen Kutter – the K models are based on the Bedrock planes, the KK are based on the Bailey. The Winchester planes were made by either Stanley or Sargent depending on model. I have a transitional jack and I’m not too keen on it – but I know it needs some adjusting.

Otherwise I agree with the general statements above. The low-angle jack from LV is a phenomenal plane and very high on my aquisition list. That is if I can stop buying planes on eBay for a week so I can afford it =p

View BerBer5985's profile

BerBer5985

424 posts in 1078 days


#10 posted 10-11-2011 06:13 PM

I was leaning towards a jointer plane like a #6-7 and there’s a nice Record plane on ebay right now for $65 buy it now. Looks like new. I also found an older stanley 220 block plane that my dad had left which seemed to work ok as I was tinkering with for fun last night. I’d love to have a #5 jack plane, a jointer plane, and a smoothing plane. I don’t mind spending $75-$100 for a decent one because I feel like quality handtools is money well spent, but I have to warm up to the $275 Veritas. I’m sure it’s nice, but I’m gonna get a feel for liking planes before I splurge on that.

-- Greg, Owner, Quality Carpet One, www.qualitycarpetonecrofton.com

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BerBer5985

424 posts in 1078 days


#11 posted 10-11-2011 06:17 PM

And what about something like this:
http://washingtondc.craigslist.org/nva/tls/2609246482.html

Found while just browsing.

-- Greg, Owner, Quality Carpet One, www.qualitycarpetonecrofton.com

View Dan's profile

Dan

3543 posts in 1538 days


#12 posted 10-11-2011 06:23 PM

#5’s are all over ebay and you can get them for cheaper then most of the other size bench planes.

The manufacture of the plane is not as important as the users ability to properly sharpen and tune the plane. If I was starting over I would pick up a #4, #5, #7 and a block plane and then spend some money on sharpening tools/supplies.

-- Dan - "Collector of Hand Planes"

View RGtools's profile

RGtools

3302 posts in 1312 days


#13 posted 10-11-2011 06:31 PM

Wood River makes a solid user plane at a good price. The number 6 handles a really fair amount of work for your first “real” plane. If you can, grab a second blade that you can grind a camber into so you can hog material off with it. Sold at woodcraft. Keep in mind the kind of work you would like to do though since that will affect the size plane you would need. if your tend towards smaller work go with a 5 instead.

Also don’t forget sharpening gear.

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

View Furnitude's profile

Furnitude

339 posts in 2164 days


#14 posted 10-11-2011 06:35 PM

Just remember that learning to use planes and learning to restore planes are two different things. Your main focus seems to be learning to use planes, so perhaps you should buy something either new or something used but modern. Planes do very specific things. That’s why there are so many different kinds. Each one has a different job, though some overlap. Deciding which plane to buy entirely depends on what you want to do with it. My go-to plane is a Lie-Nielsen low-angle jack plane. It is long enough to do most jointing work and it has a fine-enough mouth to do smoothing work.

If you can save up for a new (or gently used) Lie-Nielsen or Veritas plane, I think you would have a better first experience and that might keep you going. If it is a question of not wanting to pay for an expensive plane (which I can totally relate to) and buying a cheaper plane is the only way to get you into planing, then buy a cheaper one.

As fun as this kind of conversation is, I would also recommend that you buy a plane and get to work. No matter what plane you buy, you’ll always be thinking about which one to buy next.

-- Mitch, http://furnitude.blogspot.com Also blog at http://www.craftsy.com/blog/author/mitch-roberson/

View BerBer5985's profile

BerBer5985

424 posts in 1078 days


#15 posted 10-11-2011 06:47 PM

I have a feeling I’ll get addicted to it. I think my primary focus that I’m interested in is making boxes. I know everyone and their mother makes boxes, but it’s something useful that you can get creative with. So edge jointing is important to mix different species of woods together for visual effect so a jointer would would be nice but also a smoothing plane to get everything smooth. I have a thickness planer, but no jointer so I do most edge jointing on the table saw or router with straight edge, but the setup takes a little time. It’d be nice to throw a piece in a vice, grab the jointer plane and be done with it in the time it would take to set up a router and straight edge.

-- Greg, Owner, Quality Carpet One, www.qualitycarpetonecrofton.com

View BerBer5985's profile

BerBer5985

424 posts in 1078 days


#16 posted 10-11-2011 06:51 PM

I think the idea about planes to me is that it adds even more hand crafted nature to the workpiece. When you give someone a gift that you made that you hand planed, smoothed, jointed, etc, it just promotes even more pride. I’d love to learn to hand cut dovetails too, but that will be another day. I love power tools, but sometimes it takes so long to set them up that by learning the skill, you’d be done with the task before the setup is complete. Plus, it seems like hand tools last forever and are simple so spending good money on something that will last forever as opposed to spending money on new (poor quality made in china) power tools of today that break and need expensive replacement parts such as motors and gears, etc makes sense. Plus, a hand plane is a lot safer than a power jointer.

-- Greg, Owner, Quality Carpet One, www.qualitycarpetonecrofton.com

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1350 days


#17 posted 10-11-2011 07:34 PM

Has anyone recommended “all of them” yet?

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View BerBer5985's profile

BerBer5985

424 posts in 1078 days


#18 posted 10-11-2011 08:24 PM

What about this set? Looks like a decent set of 3 for a little more than one Veritas:

http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/2021170/33442/WoodRiver-Ultimate-Cabinet-Makers-Kit.aspx

Or is it worth just splurging and buying 1 veritas low angle jack plane to get started. I figured if I hated it, I can always sell it and not lose much on it. I feel like quality tools is something that doesn’t lose value quickly. Or should I put the money towards a power jointer since I don’t have one? I basically have $300 to spend. haha!

-- Greg, Owner, Quality Carpet One, www.qualitycarpetonecrofton.com

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12290 posts in 2755 days


#19 posted 10-11-2011 08:26 PM

The question I would ask is what type of work are you doing?

Nominally a #4 for smoothing a board….

a #5 for doing rough work if the blade is cambered. With a non-cambered blade it can do smoothing work as well. Some people keep two blades sharpened to support either task. Also some people use a #40 scrub plane to perform this task.

a #7 Jointer plane for flattening boards.

The three of these types of planes are normally be used in conjunction. Normally, the #5 is used to flatten the board and get it to a specific dimension, then the jointer plane is used to make the board flat and remove marks made by #5. Then a smoothing plane is used to put the final finish on the board.

If your using a plower planer and power jointer, you can drop the #5 from the list and continue with the jointer plane and then the smoothing plane.

The sizes can vary some for these planes (e.g. some people prefer smaller smoothers such as a #3 or a wider one such as a #4 1/2)

A block plane is good for fine work to augment power tool woodworking. I like low angle adjustable planes such as a Stanley #60 1/2 or #65.

Shoulder plane is great if your doing M&T joint work

Router plane for cleaning up dados

etc….

Recommendation would be a pre-WW2 Stanley and a couple of blades. Get sharpening supplies and learn to sharpen it. Set a blade for rough work and one for fine work, then branch from there to other planes. Second recommendation would be aligned with Al’s. Buy one of every style plane on the market and try them all…. : ^ )

Actually, I think Don patented that approach.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View RGtools's profile

RGtools

3302 posts in 1312 days


#20 posted 10-11-2011 08:34 PM

Now that we know you are making boxes…. I low angle jack would be a VERY good way to go (grab the toothing blade for veneer work).

Wayne, Al and I are likley to enable you in your addiction way more that we should.

The router, or a decent plow plane would be the first specialty plane I would grab (if you use a TS the router is way more practical though)

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12290 posts in 2755 days


#21 posted 10-11-2011 08:43 PM

I missed the boxes part…. low angle jack on a shooting board would be your friend….. From router plane for box making perspective, I’m sticking with the Record 043/044 recommendation I keep making to Douglas B…

http://www.lie-nielsen.com/pdf/Shooting_Board_And_Fixtures.pdf

http://www.evenfallstudios.com/woodworks/2009/03/29/introducing-a-shooting-board-from-evenfall-studios/

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

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BerBer5985

424 posts in 1078 days


#22 posted 10-11-2011 11:05 PM

Still interested in those wood river. I just picked up WoodMagazine and it was reviewed with 5 stars. That set of 3 might do the trick. Pick up 3 of those to get me started and then move on to maybe veritas as I grow. FYI, justfor fun, I was at harbor freight and they have a decent bench plane for $9. I bought one for fun because well it was $9 made in India and seems solidly built for what I paid for it. Ill let you know if it works or falls apart first try. Haha I still want some nice ones but I’ll snap some pics of it for fun

-- Greg, Owner, Quality Carpet One, www.qualitycarpetonecrofton.com

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

6939 posts in 1571 days


#23 posted 10-11-2011 11:43 PM

I have the WoodRiver low angle BP and the #4, and in my limited experience like them a lot and used both extensively while building my first big project workbench. The low angle BP really came in handy with fitting my large dovetails on the rails.

I also have three old Sargents (Comparison here):

#418 Fore Plane -- unrestored
#418VBM Fore Plane -- restored
#422 Jack Plane -- cleaned but unrestored early Type II
On the Sargent #418VBM I now have a Hock blade and that makes a BIG difference. On another I have the Veritas scraper plane insert. I have not used this much other than testing it out after receiving it, but it does seem to be a very good dedicated use for one of my older Sargent #418s. The #422 base, being very early (thin base), is not nearly as stable so it may end up as an ornament. Time will tell. I just HAD to have the TYPE II with the twisted frog and thin base ;-)

As others have said, have a GOOD sharpening system. I use the scary sharp method, but it is slow. If I could afford it I would upgrade to a good automated grinder system.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

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Gary Roberts

136 posts in 1679 days


#24 posted 10-12-2011 01:18 AM

I don’t think it’s about A hand plane. It’s about what hand planes. In my book, it’s these three:

1. low angle block plane
2. #4 or 3 smooth (depends on the size of your hands)
3. #5 jack

4. if you have the cash, a #7 is nice as a jointer for long edges. For surfacing face boards, the 5 will do the trick, followed by the 4.

If you buy and older Stanley or Sargent or Millers Falls from a reputable tool dealer you’ll get a great tool that will last a lifetime for a fraction of the price. Add a Hock iron and yer golden. These three will be the most often used of all your planes.

-- Gary Roberts, http://toolemera.com

View BerBer5985's profile

BerBer5985

424 posts in 1078 days


#25 posted 10-12-2011 02:04 AM

That’s why I think maybe the combo set of Woodriver might be a good place to start. It pretty much covers what Ill need as you just mentioned above. My other question was is it worth it to spend the money on the hand planes or get a decent power jointer. I don’t have one yet, but I was thinking of buying hand planes for that chore instead of the jointer. I figured any decent jointer is going to run $300-$400 and that’s for a low budget one. I could get the set of 3 hand planes for $369 and that sounds like it will do what the jointer will, but with a liittle more time and finess. Can hand planes take the place of a dedicated jointer in a shop, or should I still go ahead and get a jointer?

-- Greg, Owner, Quality Carpet One, www.qualitycarpetonecrofton.com

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WayneC

12290 posts in 2755 days


#26 posted 10-12-2011 02:14 AM

Are you making furnature or boxes?

If your making furnature, I think the question would probably be more along the lines of handplanes vs a thickness planer… Easier to to get one face flat than it is to get a second face parallel and flat…. Recommendation would be power jointer / power planer and then finish with a combo of a Jointer plane and Smoothing plane. If you had to drop one of the power tools…. Get the thickness planer first. Also you can make a sled for your thickness planer and joint boards if you have to…

For boxes, I would probably stick to hand tools and go with old stanleys. I think you can achieve the same thing with the Old Stanleys that you would with the wood rivers… You could get a solid pre-war #5 and a #4 for well under $50 if you take your time and your choosey. I see 60 1/2s at flea markets for $10 or less pretty often. Want to up the performance some, put some money in Hock or similar Blades/Irons…

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12290 posts in 2755 days


#27 posted 10-12-2011 02:39 AM

To follow up….

Look for a type 11 or type 12 Stanley Bailey plane. They have 3 patent dates behind the frog. They restore real nice. Here are some done by Brit that he posted in the Handplane of your Dreams tread….

My favorite block plane is a #65 that I got in an antique store for $25… I actually prefer it to my LN 60 1/2. I love the way it feels in my hand.

With Lie-Nielsen Plane

If you really want to go the new plane route, I would get an adjustable low angle block planes from LV or LN similar to the one above (60 1/2) and a Low Angle Jack Plane in lieu of the #4/#5 combo. If you really want a #5 for rough work, I would point you back to a vintage #5. They are all over the place. My thinking is that if your going to make a significant investment, get the LN or LV planes. They will hold their value better than the Wind River Planes.

The LN-62 Low Angle Jack is on the right. The other is a Stanley.
Stanley #62 and LN Low Angle Jack Plane

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View BerBer5985's profile

BerBer5985

424 posts in 1078 days


#28 posted 10-12-2011 04:33 AM

So if I’m gonna splurge go veritas low angle jack plane and then for the others go antique? What about the old craftsman planes? Any good? There is a craftsman jointer plane on eBay close to me for around $50.

-- Greg, Owner, Quality Carpet One, www.qualitycarpetonecrofton.com

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HorizontalMike

6939 posts in 1571 days


#29 posted 10-12-2011 05:02 AM

BerBer5985,
That old Craftsman is somewhat of a crap shoot, it may be a good user or not, but at $50 I would pass. It would/could be a good user at ~$25 but not so much at the $$$ you quoted. As mentioned earlier, old SargentVBMs are good and go for much less $$ than many others, especially Stanleys. Even with Sargent, I am somewhat apprehensive of the newer Sargent “Hercules” models.

As for me, I spent $50 on a very early Type II just to have it, not because it was a better plane (it was not), just because it was earlier/older. Pay attention to prices, and pick up any/all price guides that come along if you are serious about earlier planes. It is well worth it.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

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BerBer5985

424 posts in 1078 days


#30 posted 10-12-2011 05:05 AM

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12290 posts in 2755 days


#31 posted 10-12-2011 06:14 AM

More like this….

#5’s
http://www.ebay.com/itm/T-11-Stanley-Bailey-No-5C-JACK-PLANE-V-tm-Blade-Repainted-PARTS-USER-/130585051042?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item1e6779bfa2

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Lot-2-Vintage-Bailey-Stanley-No-5-Planes-/290616987921?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item43aa1f5111

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Stanley-5-C-Type-11-Jack-Plane-Sweetheart-Era-/280750015256?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item415e014318

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Stanley-No-5-Jack-Plane-Type-16-Pre-WW-II-Perfect-Rosewood-90-Japanning-/170709954315?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item27bf1b2f0b

#4
http://www.ebay.com/itm/STANLEY-HAND-TOOL-PLANE-101-YEAR-OLD-PAT-DATE-4-19-1910-VERY-GOOD-CONDITION-/230684975723?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item35b5e5626b

http://www.ebay.com/itm/VINTAGE-STANLEY-BAILEY-No-4-PLANE-CORRUGATED-TYPE-13-NICE-/230682927400?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item35b5c62128

Block planes

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Stanley-60-1-2-Low-Angle-Block-Plane-Nice-/260869722104?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item3cbd0c0ff8

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Stanley-65-Knuckle-Cap-Block-Plane-/320772812672?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item4aaf8caf80

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Vintage-Stanley-Tool-No-65-Low-Angle-Block-Wood-Plane-Excellent-cond-/120790600348?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item1c1fae4a9c

I would stay away from the #6 and the 1950s bench planes. Dirt, grime and broken wooden handles are not too much of an issue. Inspect carefully for breaks, damaged mouths, missing parts, etc. To add to what Mike said about Sargent, other brands to consider are Keen Kutter, Union, Ohio, and Millers Falls. Stay away from Fulton, Dunlap, Worth, Paraplus, Handyman, etc. Stay away from anything that does not have a solid metal adjustment nut or has a stamped metal (vs cast metal) frog.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

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WayneC

12290 posts in 2755 days


#32 posted 10-12-2011 06:23 AM

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WayneC

12290 posts in 2755 days


#33 posted 10-12-2011 06:31 AM

Also, where in the country are you located. It would probably be better to pop into a few antique stores or flea markets this weekend and look through some planes before buying on eBay. It is easy to get a lemon on ebay.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View BerBer5985's profile

BerBer5985

424 posts in 1078 days


#34 posted 10-12-2011 05:49 PM

I’m in MD. I went ahead a won that lot of two stanley #5’s for $37. That hopefully will be a decent start! haha! I’m excited! Now on to a jointer!

http://www.ebay.com/itm/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&_trksid=p4340.l2557&rt=nc&nma=true&item=290616987921&si=db0t5%252B4RRcjzjqkbfcx5wZ332IU%253D&viewitem=&sspagename=ADME%3AB%3ABCA%3AUS%3A1123&autorefresh=true

-- Greg, Owner, Quality Carpet One, www.qualitycarpetonecrofton.com

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Gary Roberts

136 posts in 1679 days


#35 posted 10-12-2011 05:52 PM

Excellent! Sharpen one blade with a camber for rough scrub work and one straight across (but with slightly relieved corners) for fine work. I’ve had two for going on 30 years and have never needed anything to replace them.

-- Gary Roberts, http://toolemera.com

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WayneC

12290 posts in 2755 days


#36 posted 10-12-2011 05:56 PM

Well done. : ^ )

Check out Don’s blog for restoration info…. I have a bunch of handplane related stuff in mine as well…

http://lumberjocks.com/donwilwol/blog/series/3983
http://lumberjocks.com/WayneC/blog/series/43
http://lumberjocks.com/WayneC/blog/series/40

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

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BerBer5985

424 posts in 1078 days


#37 posted 10-12-2011 06:54 PM

That’s awesome!^^ Thanks! I’m trying to figure out a good sharpening system. What do most people recommend?

-- Greg, Owner, Quality Carpet One, www.qualitycarpetonecrofton.com

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BerBer5985

424 posts in 1078 days


#38 posted 10-12-2011 06:59 PM

I saw this and it looked decent:
http://www.m-powertools.com/products/pss1/pss1-onlineshops.htm

-- Greg, Owner, Quality Carpet One, www.qualitycarpetonecrofton.com

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BerBer5985

424 posts in 1078 days


#39 posted 10-12-2011 09:19 PM

or this:
http://www.leevalley.com/US/wood/page.aspx?p=51868&cat=1,43072,43078&ap=1

-- Greg, Owner, Quality Carpet One, www.qualitycarpetonecrofton.com

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PurpLev

8476 posts in 2306 days


#40 posted 10-12-2011 09:22 PM

I have the leevalley MKII – great jig to get you started, but I do recommend getting to know how to freehand sharpen at some point.

-- 抍 When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

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Brandon

4138 posts in 1609 days


#41 posted 10-12-2011 10:09 PM

Good win on those two #5s. They should clean up nicely and give you a couple of good users. Gary’s suggestion to use one for rough work and one for smooth work is a good one. You’re off to a good start.

-- "hold fast to that which is good"

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12290 posts in 2755 days


#42 posted 10-12-2011 10:23 PM

Scary sharp is a good method if your looking to keep the initial cost down.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View Gary Roberts's profile

Gary Roberts

136 posts in 1679 days


#43 posted 10-12-2011 10:30 PM

I have one suggestion – don’t worry about sharpening. You won’t need a razor sharp edge. Scary Sharp is good, gets an edge that will do the job very well and is easy on the pocket.

-- Gary Roberts, http://toolemera.com

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HorizontalMike

6939 posts in 1571 days


#44 posted 10-12-2011 10:36 PM

FWIW, I bought a granite tile at HD for all of maybe $3.50 or so. And I use nothing more than a light oil (3in1) and that holds down my 300, 600 grit etc. I finish up on a fine stone.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

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RGtools

3302 posts in 1312 days


#45 posted 10-13-2011 04:13 AM

Another way of doing it is to cut MDF into 3×8 “stones” and use PSA to stick 400, 1500 and 2000 grit silicon carbide sandpaper (pick it up at an auto parts store) to these stones. It elevates the tool a bit more from your bench with makes life easier when you are cleaning up the back side of a tool (especially on chisels)...the drawback is you have to be a little bit more careful about not cutting up you sharpening media.

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

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BerBer5985

424 posts in 1078 days


#46 posted 10-14-2011 03:38 AM

What’s the most you would pay for a Stanley #7 jointer plane? I’m bidding on one now.

-- Greg, Owner, Quality Carpet One, www.qualitycarpetonecrofton.com

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Gary Roberts

136 posts in 1679 days


#47 posted 10-14-2011 03:51 AM

As little as you can get away with. In the end, there is no right answer to any of these questions. I’m not trying to be obtuse. If you live in an area where no flea markets are to be found, finding tools is impossible. In the Northeast, it’s much easier. Pay what you feel you can afford and not what you think the market will want.

-- Gary Roberts, http://toolemera.com

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Dallas

64 posts in 1622 days


#48 posted 11-15-2011 06:05 AM

I started with old Stanleys. I would recommend them:

1) They don’t cost too much compared to Veritas or LN. You can afford to muck around with them, learn to flatten the soles, sharpen and clean. Properly tuned, you will ALWAYS find a use for them. Even if you drop the coin on a high end set. I used my Stanley jack with a broken tote to shave down a proud door the other day. I wouldn’t like doing that with a $300 Lie-Nielson.

2) Start with the coarse, medium and fine philosophy. You should be able to remove a lot of material (coarse) in one operation, switch to another operation that really gets things flat and straight (medium), and a final operation that prepares the surface for finishing (smoothing, or fine work). If they look clean and nice on ebay, they actually might be worth the extra $30 bucks or so compared to the slew of comparables. I have a #6 Bedrock that takes smoother shavings than ALL of my smoothing planes. Sometimes you get lucky. Don’t get too formulaic with it. Approach quality over the need to obtain a catalog of #1 – #8. Technically, this means: Coarse (jack or scrub), Medium (#6-#8 for jointing) and fine (#1-#4.5 smoothing).

3) Know your tools & assign them niches (or personalities even). It doesn’t matter exactly the number of the plane you buy for each operation, just get find a niche for each tool (or even multiple blades for the same tool). For instance: My No 5 Jack plane is a Stanley. Jacks are normally reserved for roughly shaping a board which demand larger shavings pushed through more open mouths. It happens that my 5 has a very small mouth, making it hard to take big shavings. So, I use it for finer work than previously intended. On the other hand, I have a #4 cheapo Anant that roughs out quite well because the mouth is larger than normal for a smoother.

4) Once you get a base set—what I call your utility set—and learn their quirks, start collecting LN or Veritas stuff. I bought a Scrub from Veritas and adjustable mouth block plane from LN first. I actually use the scrub more than the block (I’m different in that regard). They are ROCK SOLID. I would NEVER have appreciated them if I hadn’t fumbled around with vintage tools first. They never are put away with moisture-filled shavings resting on their metal surfaces, daring to draw up rust.

You will tarnish your tools by accident. You will break a tote or ding a sole. Learn to fix your snafus and learn to sharpen. In my opinion, when you are mature enough to wipe down, sweep up, store and sharpen daily, you can afford to drop the money on heirloom quality stuff.

I bought a #4 first, then a #5, then a #7, then a scrub and block followed by a #6 and a #3. My favorites are the scrub, #7, #6 and #3. Simply because they perform well. I would rather push a tool around that does it’s job better than the “appropriate” tool a few more times and get great results versus being too uptight and only following things by the book.

My two cents in numerous paragraphs.

Dallas

-- If a tree falls in the neighbor's woods, and no one is there to hear it...can you take it home, mill it and turn it into a coffee table without your neighbor making a sound?

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RGtools

3302 posts in 1312 days


#49 posted 11-15-2011 03:53 PM

Dallas. This is an awesome post. Would mind re-posting this here?

I so agree with finding a niche for your planes. They work so much better as a system.

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

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