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All Replies on Who does inlay ?

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View Cozmo35's profile

Who does inlay ?

by Cozmo35
posted 934 days ago


32 replies so far

View chrisstef's profile

chrisstef

9364 posts in 1507 days


#1 posted 934 days ago

i cant tell you about bending anything besides the rules but figured id congratulate you and your wife on the anniversary … enjoy hawaii !

-- "there aren’t many hand tools as awe-inspiring as the #8 jointer. I mean, it just reeks of cast iron heft and hubris" - Smitty

View patron's profile

patron

12842 posts in 1842 days


#2 posted 934 days ago

happy 25th

have a great vacation

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View SASmith               's profile

SASmith

1489 posts in 1488 days


#3 posted 934 days ago

I’m not sure what you mean. I thought inlay did not go all the way through.
Check out this project of mine. http://lumberjocks.com/projects/51439 pic 5
Is this the type of work you are talking about?
If so I would be happy to discuss my methods.
Have a great vacation!
Scott

-- Scott Smith, Southern Illinois

View rance's profile

rance

4106 posts in 1661 days


#4 posted 934 days ago

Cosmo,

First off, congratulations. You and your wife are to be commended. Maybe moreso your wife, for putting up with you. :) Oh, and I’m jealous. My wife and I want to go to Hawaii too. Maybe next year. Let us know about your trip when you get back.

I too have done some work that ends up a seamless mess of the two species that becomes a beautiful work of fart. Seriously, I would be very happy to join in a conversation discussing different techniques for obtaining the results you are looking for.

I think there is a fine line(pun intended) between Inlay, Marquetry, and Laminations. Sometimes the techniques used become a blur.

-- Backer boards, stop blocks, build oversized, and never buy a hand plane--

View reggiek's profile

reggiek

2240 posts in 1771 days


#5 posted 934 days ago

Are you sure you do not mean segmented? I have always considered inlay as a method of imbedding a piece of wood or material into a different piece of wood…but not all the way through. Segmenting is where you take different pieces of wood and put them together to form one piece…perhaps it’s just a matter of semantics but maybe a picture would describe the method you are interested in?

-- Woodworking.....My small slice of heaven!

View BertFlores58's profile

BertFlores58

1634 posts in 1423 days


#6 posted 934 days ago

Mike,
Gluing two boards makes an exciting results, here are some of the unfinished projects I have but I was able to do a board of parabolic ellipse waiting to become a tray. Here are one of the photo in my parabolic ellipse blog series.

Banding is also a challenging work that if inlayed it makes a box beautiful like below:

Anything I can assist you will be my pleasure.

-- Bert

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BertFlores58

1634 posts in 1423 days


#7 posted 934 days ago

Mike,
Have a happy silver wedding anniversary! Hope for more prosperous years together.

-- Bert

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

1502 posts in 1423 days


#8 posted 934 days ago

It is called “Double Bevel Inlay” I do it a lot. Do a search for it and you will find a lot of good info on this method of inlay.

-- In God We Trust

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

1502 posts in 1423 days


#9 posted 934 days ago

-- In God We Trust

View rance's profile

rance

4106 posts in 1661 days


#10 posted 934 days ago

I’ve seen CNC used for that Jim. Is that what you use? I can’t imagine someone doing that by hand.

-- Backer boards, stop blocks, build oversized, and never buy a hand plane--

View janice's profile

janice

1079 posts in 1926 days


#11 posted 934 days ago

Happy 25th and have a good one! But I know nothing about inlay.

-- Janice

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Bearpie

2575 posts in 1519 days


#12 posted 934 days ago

Congratulations on your 25th and have a wonderful trip and time and be sure to try and bring some Koa back home. ;-)

I think Jim Finn hit on what you were looking for and asking about.

-- Erwin, Jacksonville, FL

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14401 posts in 2177 days


#13 posted 934 days ago

Congrats and have a good tiime.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Cozmo35's profile

Cozmo35

2197 posts in 1537 days


#14 posted 934 days ago

Jim Finn, you are exactly right. It is called “Double Bevel Inlay”. That I did not know. I usually get this done on my scroll saw by tilting the table and cutting the two pieces at the same time. This will allow on piece to fit into the other like a cork. See, I already learned something! Thanks you to everyone else also. Your input has taught me somethings as well. I would also like to thank you all for your well whishes on my anniversary! :-)

Keep the comments coming. I will check in on the forum when I get back. Take Care!!!

-- If you don't work, you don't eat!.....Garland, TX

View SteviePete's profile

SteviePete

221 posts in 1804 days


#15 posted 933 days ago

There’s no getting around it…...OFF TOPIC. This is a marriage gloat if I’ve ever seen one. s

-- Steve, 'Sconie Great White North

View Cozmo35's profile

Cozmo35

2197 posts in 1537 days


#16 posted 933 days ago

Yes Sir!

-- If you don't work, you don't eat!.....Garland, TX

View MrsN's profile

MrsN

930 posts in 2027 days


#17 posted 933 days ago

I dont do it alot, but it is really fun!

-- ----- www.KNWoodworking.com ----- --

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

1502 posts in 1423 days


#18 posted 933 days ago

” I’ve seen CNC used for that Jim. Is that what you use? I can’t imagine someone doing that by hand.”

I use a scroll saw only. No CNC. Yes stacking the wood and cutting at slight angle (3.7 degrees) is how it is done.

-- In God We Trust

View rance's profile

rance

4106 posts in 1661 days


#19 posted 932 days ago

I realize now I was thinking of a similar, but different process. Thanks for the clarification. I’m still interested in the discussion.

If it is what I’ll call the “Scrollsaw Bevel Inlay” process, are there other processes that will work that don’t require a bevel on the SS? Still using the SS for the cutting of course.

-- Backer boards, stop blocks, build oversized, and never buy a hand plane--

View MrsN's profile

MrsN

930 posts in 2027 days


#20 posted 932 days ago

Rance -
You can stack two pieces and reverse the order that you put the cut-out back into a piece. This will leave a line around the cut out, depending on the blade used the size of the line will vary. The gap can be filled with a sawdust/glue mix or colored glues/epoxies for a fun effect. It isn’t the seamless effect of two types becoming one, but can look cool.
you can also cut the pattern twice, very accuratly. once cutting to save the outside, once cutting to save the inside. You have to be crazy accurate, and pay attention to which side of the line you need to keep.

-- ----- www.KNWoodworking.com ----- --

View shipwright's profile (online now)

shipwright

4660 posts in 1299 days


#21 posted 932 days ago

I think what you are referring to is Double bevel marquetry. There are a number of very talented practitioners here on LJ’s. Do an LJ’s search on double bevel marquetry and you’ll find them.

Scott (SASmith) has it right, inlay generally refers to insetting a thinner piece, the inlay, into a solid piece that is thicker.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fiberglass trees. http://prmdesigns.com/

View Cozmo35's profile

Cozmo35

2197 posts in 1537 days


#22 posted 920 days ago

I use my scroll saw to achieve the “Double bevel marquetry”. It is a technique that I have been interested in for a while. Here is my latest attempt. I was a little worried about the small tips. They are really fragile.

-- If you don't work, you don't eat!.....Garland, TX

View Cozmo35's profile

Cozmo35

2197 posts in 1537 days


#23 posted 912 days ago

Made it back from out vacation! It was GREAT!

But, back to the discussion about “Double bevel marquetry”. I was wondering if there were any fellow LJ that used this technique in their projects and if so, where can I see the pictures?

-- If you don't work, you don't eat!.....Garland, TX

View shipwright's profile (online now)

shipwright

4660 posts in 1299 days


#24 posted 912 days ago

There are several.
Do a search and you’ll get lots of stuff to look at.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fiberglass trees. http://prmdesigns.com/

View Cozmo35's profile

Cozmo35

2197 posts in 1537 days


#25 posted 870 days ago

Does anyone have any suggestions for filling the pilot holes. I have a way of doing it, but would like to hear how others do it before I comment.

-- If you don't work, you don't eat!.....Garland, TX

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

1502 posts in 1423 days


#26 posted 869 days ago

I fill the pilot holes by mixing wood powder, from my orbital sander, with white glue or lacquer sanding sealer. Allow to dry and sand off. I prefer the sanding sealer because if I miss a spot when sanding it will not show up when I put the finish on the piece, like glue will. I use this same method to make internal details like on the Virgin Mary figure. I carve the lines into the poplar ,in this case, after inlaying it with a “V” tool and then fill the groove with that same mixture of sanding powder and lacquer. Let it dry and sand off. Here are photos of my most recent inlays:

-- In God We Trust

View Cozmo35's profile

Cozmo35

2197 posts in 1537 days


#27 posted 869 days ago

Jim, I also use the glue and sanded powder from the sander to fill my pilot holes. I have never used the lacquer method. What brand do you use? I would be very interested in trying that method. Thanks for your repsonse.

Mike

-- If you don't work, you don't eat!.....Garland, TX

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

1502 posts in 1423 days


#28 posted 869 days ago

I use “Deft” brand sanding sealer. Deft lacquer will also work.

-- In God We Trust

View dbray45's profile

dbray45

2468 posts in 1278 days


#29 posted 869 days ago

I have done some and made my own banding. It is is fun and challenging, will do more as time goes on.

-- David in Damascus, MD

View JoeyG's profile

JoeyG

1229 posts in 1126 days


#30 posted 867 days ago

http://lumberjocks.com/JoeyG/blog/26663

I have been doing epoxy inlays lately. It’s a different beast from what you are doing, but fun none the less. I don’t have a scroll saw and the wood inlays I did took forever. Now I basically have the rainbow at my disposal in color choices.

-- JoeyG ~~~ http://www.facebook.com/JHGWoodWorks

View rance's profile

rance

4106 posts in 1661 days


#31 posted 859 days ago

Mike, I’ve heard of folks using a Danish Oil slurrey the same way. It appears that many finishes could be used to do the sawdust filler method.

Regarding filling the pilot holes… Something that just popped into my head was to drill near the long grain edge of a piece where a convex occurrs like so:

You could then cut along a line parallel to the grain and more easilly replace that edge of the inlay(matching the grain or course). Then re-cut that new edge. I’ve never done this, I’m just thinking out loud.

-- Backer boards, stop blocks, build oversized, and never buy a hand plane--

View Cozmo35's profile

Cozmo35

2197 posts in 1537 days


#32 posted 858 days ago

Rance, I have pondered that idea myself, but have not tried it. I would “think” that it would be hard to replicate the exact same convex curve. With even a slight variation, it would have a gap. It is worth a try though! The next one I do, I will try that. Thanks!

-- If you don't work, you don't eat!.....Garland, TX


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