LumberJocks

All Replies on Cordless Electric Chainsaw

  • Advertise with us
View richgreer's profile

Cordless Electric Chainsaw

by richgreer
posted 1074 days ago


31 replies so far

View racerglen's profile

racerglen

2295 posts in 1413 days


#1 posted 1074 days ago

Or if you have one of those inverter s on yr truck.. Our forest service crews use small electric saws that way..
Or..
Rent one ?

-- Glen, Vernon B.C. Canada

View PutnamEco's profile

PutnamEco

155 posts in 1919 days


#2 posted 1074 days ago

Wait until this fall when Stihl comes out with their version, the MSA 160 C. The others on offer are little more than a cruel joke. Stihl has a large enough battery to give some kind of run time.

The only other contender is the Makita BUC250RD which isn’t available in the USA. You could go gray market as Makita does have a 36v charger available in the USA. They do offer a 12v NiMh saw that I feel is really underpowered.

18v or less just isn’t really enough battery to make it worth upgrading from a reciprocating saw. If your happy with Black & Decker quality tools, you might find some joy in their current offerings. Ryobi also offers a saw. For me, I can’t justify spending money on a cheap tool like them, only to be disappointed in the operation and durability of the tool.

If you need this type of tool for a one off project you would be better off paying the money to hire a man with a saw. If your in it for the long run, do yourself a favor and buy a quality tool.

-- “The test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much; it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little.” ― Franklin D. Roosevelt

View juniorjock's profile

juniorjock

1930 posts in 2398 days


#3 posted 1074 days ago

Rick, something to think about is the saws that are on poles that extend. They come electric or gas. You can remove the saw from the pole and use the saw as a standard chain saw too.

- JJ

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3645 posts in 1797 days


#4 posted 1074 days ago

Don’t know much about battery operated ones, but I have a 14” McCullough corded electric one that I used for years with my motorhome to cut firewood while out camping, and to clean up fallen branches from the trees here in town. I have a couple of old gas powered ones that I haven’t used in 20 years. Gotta give ‘em to my son-in-law up in Fairbanks. They are stored in a wooden case I made about 30 plus years ago, and they look exactly like when I put them away. Gas powered chain saws are definitely not good for occasional use. That’s why a bought the electric one. That electric one works every time.

Consider the Honda generator/corded saw combo. Probably work without problems for years.

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View Gregn's profile

Gregn

1642 posts in 1616 days


#5 posted 1074 days ago

Here’s a couple of reviews on the 10” model if it helps any.
http://www.mysears.com/Craftsman-19-2-Volt-10-quot-Cordless-Chain-Saw-reviews

-- I don't make mistakes, I have great learning lessons, Greg

View richgreer's profile

richgreer

4522 posts in 1708 days


#6 posted 1074 days ago

Thanks for the excellent input. I had not thought of a generator or truck inverter. There is a good argument that I should have a generator for other purposes also.

If I want to stay with my cordless electric idea, Stihl looks like it is worth waiting for. However, the reviews on the Sears model are better than I expected and I am sure the Sears model is cheaper than what the Stihl will be.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

View richgreer's profile

richgreer

4522 posts in 1708 days


#7 posted 1073 days ago

Thanks CessnaPilotBarry – good points.

As I have said before, I could change my name to “PiperPilotRich”.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

View PutnamEco's profile

PutnamEco

155 posts in 1919 days


#8 posted 1073 days ago

Re: richgreer says:
”However, the reviews on the Sears model are better than I expected”

I believe the Craftsman is made by Ryobi. It seems to use their battery.

If you insist on going down toward 18v look into the Makita BUC122Z which at least is Lith-Ion.

I hope your not planning on doing more than a dozen cuts or cutting anything over 3-4 inches…

I would advise you to find some more reviews that are NOT on the site trying to sell you one…...

-- “The test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much; it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little.” ― Franklin D. Roosevelt

View richgreer's profile

richgreer

4522 posts in 1708 days


#9 posted 1073 days ago

Good points, PutnamEco.

As an FYI, my wife used to own a flower shop. There were several places on the internet where people offered reviews of her store. Most of the reviews were very positive. I know – I wrote most of them myself using different names. I probably should not admit that, but I share it just so other people know that this is a very common practice.

For the record, I never wrote a negative review on a competitor’s flower shop. That seemed to “cross a line” I didn’t want to cross, but I know it has been done by others.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

View Eric_S's profile

Eric_S

1521 posts in 1828 days


#10 posted 1073 days ago

How about this Rich… and yes its real. Good for camping.

http://www.thinkgeek.com/gadgets/tools/ea93/

-- - Eric Indianapolis, IN

View PutnamEco's profile

PutnamEco

155 posts in 1919 days


#11 posted 1073 days ago

If your going to choose an electric, there are three competitors in the professional saw market. Stihl again would be my preference. The MSE220 is the most powerful electric saw easily available. Sthil also makes a homeowner grade pair of saws the MS140/180 C-BQ Husquavarna has their 316E which is a fairly good saw, but not as powerful as the big Stihl, nor is it as comfortable for me to use as the Stihl. Third would be the Makita UC3530A which has a real following among the chainsaw carvers, as, I believe, it spins at a higher RPM. To me it seems that this saw is the least powerful, it is however a very comfortable saw to use. All these saws use commonly available saw chains and bars.

A comparison in quality to these saws compared to Worx, Remington, Craftsman, etc. would be like comparing Bosch, Milwaukee, or Makita circular saws to Black & Decker, Ryobi, or Craftsman circular saws.

I made my living with chainsaws for a bunch of years and still work with them often.

-- “The test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much; it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little.” ― Franklin D. Roosevelt

View PutnamEco's profile

PutnamEco

155 posts in 1919 days


#12 posted 1073 days ago

Re: EricS says
How about this?_

Wire saws can be easier to use and carry. I like the Military survival saw (NSN 5110-00-570-6896)

-- “The test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much; it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little.” ― Franklin D. Roosevelt

View Eric_S's profile

Eric_S

1521 posts in 1828 days


#13 posted 1073 days ago

PutnamEco, the link I posted was a new item posted yesterday on a site I regularly visit earlier.

I’m pretty sure the one you posted would be much better quality. Thanks for your link to it. I’ve never heard of these.

-- - Eric Indianapolis, IN

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14726 posts in 2309 days


#14 posted 1073 days ago

If you don’t have too many to do, a hand saw cuts green limbs faster than a reciprocating saw. That is what I use most of the time for small work rather than fiddle with my chainsaws.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View mtnwild's profile

mtnwild

3474 posts in 2160 days


#15 posted 1073 days ago

I’ve been thinking the same thing. Then just the other day, I saw an infomercial on a new Oregon, electric chainsaw they are just introducing. Looks sweet!! They never said the price, so I,m thinking they are not cheap.

The Computer address is, GetPowerNowSaw.com…........
1-800-728-7503…...............

Check it out, I thought it looked pretty good. Course that’s what the commercial is supposed to do…......

-- mtnwild (Jack), It's not what you see, it's how you see it.

View ChuckC's profile

ChuckC

683 posts in 1568 days


#16 posted 1073 days ago

I’m just curious, what kind of blade are you using on the reciprocating saw. I’ve had good luck with a pruning blade meant to cut branches.

View richgreer's profile

richgreer

4522 posts in 1708 days


#17 posted 1073 days ago

When things look too good to be true, they usually are. This Oregon saw almost looks too good to be true.

I see there are 2 versions with one having a heavier battery and longer running time. Total weight of 9.5 or 10.5 is higher than most gas chainsaws, but I won’t be using it all day (I hope).

I’d be curious to see if anyone else can comment on this saw.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14726 posts in 2309 days


#18 posted 1073 days ago

I just looked at it. 4 payments of 99.99 + S&H The problem I see with battery chainsaws is lack of use is very hard on batteries. I have some 18 volt drill batteries that weren’t used much and they are definitely showing low power and short run times vs the ones I wore out using ;-((

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14726 posts in 2309 days


#19 posted 1073 days ago

For that kind of money, I would go with a Home owner’s level Stihl and keep $150 in my pocket ;-)) HF sells a Poulan I did a review on for < $100. It starts better with a differnt spark plug than teh facotry sent. Just a couple of other options.

How much cutting are you talkig about Rich?

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View jerkylips's profile

jerkylips

233 posts in 1203 days


#20 posted 1073 days ago

just curious about your opinions of gas-powered chainsaws.. Have you completely ruled them out? If not, you can usually find nice stihl’s or echo’s on craigslist very reasonably. I think the problem you’ll run into (as others have alluded to) is that to find something cordless that performs anywhere near as well as a gas-powered saw, you’re going to pay a ton. If you do go that route (gas), steer clear of anything you can buy at Home Depot/Lowes/etc. They’re basically all the same saw, re-badged. I bought a Homelite at HD this year because I had no choice – I needed it ASAP & it was a weekend. It leaked bar oil all over my garage floor, started hard, I mean, REALLY hard, and the chain tensioner came off while I was using it (!). It’s really scary to see that the chain is held in place by a wing nut & a big hunk of plastic..

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14726 posts in 2309 days


#21 posted 1073 days ago

Those cheap saws leak are oil because of pressure in the tank to run the oiling. If you crack the filler lid when you are done to relieve the pressure, it will stop the oil leak. I got tired of cleaning up the mess and figured out the why ;-))

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View richgreer's profile

richgreer

4522 posts in 1708 days


#22 posted 1073 days ago

Topamax makes a valid point. This saw will get used 2-3 times per year. That is probably just enough usage to justify buying a saw as opposed to renting when I need one. However, both gasoline chainsaws and batteries suffer from lack of use.

Still thinking. I need to get some stuff cut down and cleared out this fall. Hopefully, that means I still have a couple of months.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

View Cosmicsniper's profile

Cosmicsniper

2199 posts in 1792 days


#23 posted 1073 days ago

I’d buy a small Echo. I did lawn maintenance for 24 years, either as a full time job or as a part time job. All our trimming gear was Echo. I consider it the Festool of such tools, without the steep price. The tree guys just attach them to their belt and whip it out faster than lightning. I never had a Echo product break…and when we bought new ones, it was just to get something new. They start the same way every time…they have a very even temperament…and they only get dirty if you cut roots with them. Keeping them clean isn’t a big deal…you wouldn’t think of letting your Festools stay dirty, would you?

Otherwise, using a corded saw plugged into an inverter in the truck is a real easy way to get the job done.

-- jay, www.allaboutastro.com

View Howie's profile

Howie

2656 posts in 1556 days


#24 posted 1073 days ago

I have a Sears 14” electric that has been really serviceable. Note that I don’t use it but two or three times a year.

-- Life is good.

View wchips's profile

wchips

314 posts in 1721 days


#25 posted 1073 days ago

I have a Remington electric chain saw.it is on a 10’ poll for trimming trees I am happey with its preformance.I have vsed 100’ cord on it several times no ill effects yet. I bought it at Tractor Supply several years ago

-- wchips

View David Grimes's profile

David Grimes

2072 posts in 1273 days


#26 posted 1073 days ago

The craftsman C3 is a sweet little saw that will not give you any trouble for 6” an under sawing. It takes either the niCad or the Lithium ion batteries. It sounds like your needs fall well below what it has to offer.

And having the batteries and charger will open up the entire c3 line to you. I have nearly every possible c3 tool (except the personal fan, Wagner-like paint sprayer, the wet/dry vac, and the chemical sprayer). I have never had any of these tools fail or not perform. I use them every day.

Craftsman C3 is not made by Ryobi and does not share batteries with Ryobi. In truth, it is the Ridgid tools that are manufacturing first cousins to the Ryobi 18 volt, but there is a world of difference between them as well.

-- If you're going to stir the pot, think BIG spoon or SMALL boat paddle. David Grimes, Georgia

View David Grimes's profile

David Grimes

2072 posts in 1273 days


#27 posted 1073 days ago

They might be rednecks.

-- If you're going to stir the pot, think BIG spoon or SMALL boat paddle. David Grimes, Georgia

View richgreer's profile

richgreer

4522 posts in 1708 days


#28 posted 1073 days ago

I’m starting to think that putting an inverter on my truck and buying a corded electric chainsaw may be the right option for me. I can easily get my truck within 20’ of anything I want to cut.

However, I know virtually nothing about inverters other than what I learned from The Inverter Store website.

http://www.theinverterstore.com/?gclid=CKv0qr68rqsCFSEEQAodgSLlHg

I am thinking that I need about 2000 watts to power a chain saw. Does anyone know if I am right about that?

Am I right that I want a modified sine inverter? I have no idea what that is.

Any input would be greatly appreciated.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

View PutnamEco's profile

PutnamEco

155 posts in 1919 days


#29 posted 1072 days ago

I would go to a larger inverter if your going to be running power tools, 3000 watts would not be unrealistic. Undersize an inverter and you stand the chance of burning out the tools you hook up to it. most power tools like circular saws and chainsaws can draw a healthy amount of current when they are under a load, especially if there is any binding going on, not to mention the draw they take when they first start,

Sine wave is referring to the way the current alternates. What you get out of the wall sockets is referred to as a pure sine wave, meaning it has a nice smooth transition when switching poles. A modified sine wave does the transition in a number of steps rather than a smooth transition. A square wave inverter switches the poles abruptly, with nothing to buffer the change. A modified (or square) sine wave inverter can cause problems with things other than simple motors and incandescent lights. If all you will be using it for are power tools WITHOUT variable speed controls it should be fine. Most of my variable speed tools work with a modified wave, I did have a router that the speed surged when I ran it at anything other than full speed. YMMV. A lot of electronics do NOT like modified (or square) sine waves, especially from some of the cheaper inverters, who only spec a single step into their “waves”. Some florescent lights may even balk at running on them having a hard time starting and humming a lot after they do.You should probably forget about listening to most radios or TVs (hum) from them as well. Wall wart power supplied things are usually not affected by them though.

-- “The test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much; it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little.” ― Franklin D. Roosevelt

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14726 posts in 2309 days


#30 posted 1072 days ago

I am not sure of the power out put of alternators in vehicles, but all day use is likely to run your battery down even if the vehicle is running. Deep cycles are very hard on automotive batteries. It should be fine for occasional short period usage.

Keep in mind the inverter needs to located as close to the 12v source as possible. Voltage drop in 12 volt circuits can be excessive and to the point of rendering them useless.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View JohnAndrew's profile

JohnAndrew

5 posts in 1072 days


#31 posted 1072 days ago

An electric chainsaw can do a fine job so long as the blade is sharp.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase