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View KayBee's profile (online now)

Which hand tools for tool boxes?

by KayBee
posted 09-04-2011 02:40 AM


39 replies so far

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12302 posts in 2842 days


#1 posted 09-04-2011 02:56 AM

Some small assortments of hardware (screws, nails, etc.) Nail set, pliers, channel locks, cresent wrench, small level, stud finder….

Oh, Tape measure.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View KayBee's profile (online now)

KayBee

1020 posts in 1991 days


#2 posted 09-04-2011 03:02 AM

The hardware is a great idea! Thanks.

-- Karen - a little bit of stupid goes a long way

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12302 posts in 2842 days


#3 posted 09-04-2011 03:05 AM

Your welcome. I put a set together for my daughter when she went off to college. I really like this little drill/driver set….

http://www.amazon.com/Makita-LCT203W-10-8-Volt-Lithium-Ion-Two-Piece/dp/B001DNMUZG/ref=sr_1_11?ie=UTF8&qid=1315098244&sr=8-11

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

1741 posts in 1666 days


#4 posted 09-04-2011 03:16 AM

in the hardware kit I suggest picture hanging hardware along with hollow wall anchors. (the screw in type)

-- In God We Trust

View docholladay's profile

docholladay

1287 posts in 1803 days


#5 posted 09-04-2011 03:18 AM

I am in the process of creating what I refer to as the “Move Out” tool kit for my two sons that I will give to them when they move out “permanently” for the first time (I don’t count the dorm at college where my oldest lives at the moment). I am including the same things you have listed. Basic wrenches, sockets, screwdrivers, hammer, pliers & drill. In addition, I am planning to include some chisels (with strong instructions not to use them for a pry bar), a block plane, coping saw and a tool box sized hand saw. A lot of items could be built with that little tool kit.

Doc

-- Hey, woodworking ain't brain surgery. Just do something and keep trying till you get it. Doc

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1860 days


#6 posted 09-04-2011 03:28 AM

I hope they have learned from Mom :-)
yes a set of screwdrivers + a set of torxs-cerwdrivers , pliers , a handsaw .. yes a handsaw .. you never know
square and a ruler , don´t forget a pensel :-) , hammers one small pen and a medium claw, level , Voltmeter
or testpen , the smart electric thing that can find electric wires and plumming/watertubes in the walls

okay the wishlist is long you know all about that yourself :-)

but a deasent handdrill is usualy the first powertool every DIY got and today I presume its a 12-14V
screw/boreing drill that becomes most handy and a set of screwbits and drillbits to it remeber the note to them about there is different drillbits for different materials like brickwalls ,wood , metal ,

as the toolfreaks most of are its hard to ristrict ourself … LOL
but I´m sure you will make a very fine toolbox to them

good luck with it
Dennis

View Cosmicsniper's profile

Cosmicsniper

2199 posts in 1903 days


#7 posted 09-04-2011 05:31 AM

Most people less mechanically inclined will reach for plyers, screwdrivers, hammer, tape measure, and level. Utility knives and a hack saw might be useful as well. Anything else gets too involved…my wife, for example, doesn’t know what to do with wrenches and socket sets.

I’ve given socket sets to guys as a graduation gift simple because they generally have cars and small machines to play around with. If they have no automotive needs, then I’d stick with tools for household use.

Yeah, hopefully you’ve taught them a thing or two!

-- jay, www.allaboutastro.com

View KayBee's profile (online now)

KayBee

1020 posts in 1991 days


#8 posted 09-04-2011 06:51 AM

Somehow, I totally missed cutting tools! (I know, bad woodworker, go time out in the shop for an hour!) Multimeter might come in handy too.

Dennis, you’re right it is hard to narrow this list down to ‘just a few’’ tools.

Between me and their mechanic father, they didn’t stand a chance of not knowing basic ‘toology.’ lol

Jay, a socket set sounds like a great graduation present. Way better than the usual cheap pen set.

-- Karen - a little bit of stupid goes a long way

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1860 days


#9 posted 09-04-2011 07:37 AM

if they are that good with tools then consider cheisels and a few plane´s as Doc say :-)
and just to avoid disastre with the cheisel throw in a small/medium pry bars wih instructions … LOL

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

15064 posts in 2420 days


#10 posted 09-04-2011 09:23 AM

I would include a combination screwdriver with a lot of tips like trox, Lionel Robins as well as slotted and Phillips. I would disagree on the Makita driver. If it is very seldom used, it is a waste of money and the batteries need to be kept charged to keep them in good shape. A corded electric drill will be a lot cheaper and work when it is needed. If I didn’t use battery drill and drivers on top of ladders all the time, I wouldn’t by one for home or in shop use.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View mtenterprises's profile

mtenterprises

836 posts in 1437 days


#11 posted 09-04-2011 03:37 PM

Ah you MUST include one of those flexable reach grip tools, you know the thing you push the button at one end to open and close the little wire fingers. Great for getting things out of the drain or the heat register. Get a real good one.
Now guys, WayneC mentioned a stud finder. Do you really think thats a proper tool to give young ladies???? HAHAHA
MIKE

-- See pictures on Flickr - http://www.flickr.com/photos/44216106@N07/ And visit my Facebook page - facebook.com/MTEnterprises

View KayBee's profile (online now)

KayBee

1020 posts in 1991 days


#12 posted 09-04-2011 07:04 PM

All great suggestions guys!

I’ll most likely go with a corded drill because of the charging issues. It’s also cheaper. I’m doing two of these.
And more band aids!

They don’t really need a stud finder, the studs keep finding them : (

-- Karen - a little bit of stupid goes a long way

View mafe's profile

mafe

9668 posts in 1834 days


#13 posted 09-04-2011 07:15 PM

Band aid.
A little set of watchmakers screwdrivers for fixing glasses and opening electronics.
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12302 posts in 2842 days


#14 posted 09-04-2011 07:16 PM

Box cutter, or a utility knife… more band aids….

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View mafe's profile

mafe

9668 posts in 1834 days


#15 posted 09-04-2011 07:35 PM

A little level for hanging pictures and other.
A pencil.

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1860 days


#16 posted 09-04-2011 07:50 PM

here some they have to buy them self
a kitchen ladder two and five steps and one of those utillity benches with buildin vice
but they have to be good usualy the biggest bench that shuold cover indoor use of
something to step up on eventualy with a board as gangway between them if they have to paint
or do wallpaperwork

Dennis

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

15064 posts in 2420 days


#17 posted 09-04-2011 08:05 PM

As an electrician, for checking power around the house by novices, I suggest you get a outlet tester. Digital Multimeters show things that you really wish you hadn’t seen ;-(( An outlet tester will tell you what is wrong.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

15064 posts in 2420 days


#18 posted 09-04-2011 08:06 PM

Forgot, your tool box should be of a design that can be used as a step stool if only to step up a few inches.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View maljr1980's profile

maljr1980

171 posts in 1201 days


#19 posted 09-05-2011 12:06 AM

ALLEN WRENCHES!!!!!

View racerglen's profile

racerglen

2386 posts in 1525 days


#20 posted 09-05-2011 01:18 PM

And a dolly to move the kit when it’s full ;-) Can’t remember if it was meantioned above but a couple of locking pliars, Vice Grips, a regular curved jaw and a needle nose type, they’re great replacements for some of the regular one purpose tools, and if you stick to the good ones, they cut wire, clamp things, latch on to things while you work on them, and in a pinch can even be a hammer..

Super Glue..as well as repairing stuff, it’s a great replacement for bandages..
And Duct tape..red and green suspenders not required..

-- Glen, Vernon B.C. Canada

View mtenterprises's profile

mtenterprises

836 posts in 1437 days


#21 posted 09-05-2011 02:06 PM

Only those of us who share your boarder understand the suspenders. HeHe HOHO
MIKE

-- See pictures on Flickr - http://www.flickr.com/photos/44216106@N07/ And visit my Facebook page - facebook.com/MTEnterprises

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

15064 posts in 2420 days


#22 posted 09-05-2011 07:00 PM

Definitely a dolly!! Harbor Frieght has a 500# movers dolly for less than $5 ;-))

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12302 posts in 2842 days


#23 posted 09-05-2011 07:27 PM

Sounds like this is evolving into a Christopher Schwarz tool box… lol

I vote for a Unisaw for each girl…

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View racerglen's profile

racerglen

2386 posts in 1525 days


#24 posted 09-05-2011 08:15 PM

And a full Snap On roller cab ? Of course the ‘57 Chev Belaire version…?

;-)]

-- Glen, Vernon B.C. Canada

View lysdexic's profile

lysdexic

4892 posts in 1367 days


#25 posted 09-05-2011 10:33 PM

I second the combo laser level/ stud finder.

-- It isn't the mountains ahead to climb that wear you out; it's the pebble in your shoe. - Muhammad Ali

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

15064 posts in 2420 days


#26 posted 09-05-2011 11:06 PM

I have never found a stud finder that consistently worked very well. A good strong magnet will work better. It will fish things out of awkward places on the end of a string, keep small screws and nails from straying, ..............

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View rustfever's profile

rustfever

639 posts in 2055 days


#27 posted 09-05-2011 11:16 PM

WOW. If you place all of these items in the tool box, you need to also give them a couple muscle-bound hunks just to carry it around.

-- Rustfever, Central California

View devann's profile

devann

1735 posts in 1437 days


#28 posted 09-05-2011 11:33 PM

I looked in my toolbox one day and thought, my I carry a lot of saws, but I think I need each one of them.

1. hacksaw. both kinds, traditional and the little one that’s not much more than a blade holder

2.pull saw

3.coping saw

4.keyhole saw

-- Darrell, making more sawdust than I know what to do with

View Don W's profile

Don W

15519 posts in 1312 days


#29 posted 09-05-2011 11:49 PM

Just buy them a pickup to carry the tools.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View BarneyTomB's profile

BarneyTomB

28 posts in 1262 days


#30 posted 09-06-2011 06:36 AM

Don’t forget drill bits, one of those folding carpet knives, and DUCT TAPE. ;-P

-- Profanity; The last refuge of the limited intellect.

View KayBee's profile (online now)

KayBee

1020 posts in 1991 days


#31 posted 09-06-2011 07:40 AM

They get Unisaws, right after I get mine. ; )

The hunks don’t seem to have any problems finding them…

Level, utility knife, drill index, vise grips, saws, more band aids

DUCT TAPE- cue the Red Green Show music

-- Karen - a little bit of stupid goes a long way

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

15064 posts in 2420 days


#32 posted 09-06-2011 07:41 AM

baling wire!! we didn’t get that yet ;-((

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1860 days


#33 posted 09-06-2011 08:19 PM

don´t forget the big DIY confusing book :-)

View Kent Shepherd's profile

Kent Shepherd

2698 posts in 2031 days


#34 posted 09-07-2011 08:37 PM

Yankee screwdriver. The batteries are never dead.

I did the same thing for my daughter when she moved out. I don’t recall what I put in it, but she was so proud when a friend was helping her at home and she could produce the tools to do the job. I never thought about the yankee screwdriver until now.

-- She thought I hung the moon--now she just thinks I did it wrong

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

16033 posts in 1611 days


#35 posted 09-07-2011 09:02 PM

I already did that for my wife once about 10 years ago and she lost, loaned out, or misplaced every one of them and ended up giving me an empty box back. I don’t think tools are a priority for my wife. She just enjoys making up a honey do list and handing it to me whenever she wants something done. :)

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View dbray45's profile

dbray45

2616 posts in 1521 days


#36 posted 09-07-2011 09:12 PM

The small pocket size philips and straight screwdrivers. Can’t change batteries without them.

-- David in Damascus, MD

View cellophane's profile

cellophane

42 posts in 1253 days


#37 posted 09-09-2011 12:04 AM

Look at some of the “homeowner toolboxes” that you can get at Target et. al. and start there.

Screwdriver packs are useful but I personally find I use the 6-in-1 drivers more than anything else unless I’m out in the shop and have the full kit in easy reach.

I also like basin wrenches and strap wrenches.

And don’t forget a measuring device or three.

View rance's profile

rance

4147 posts in 1905 days


#38 posted 09-23-2011 05:54 AM

Cordless Drill/Driver – One of those smaller Li Ion models. I love that one more than my big 18v 1/2” version. They are dainty, but VERY strong. I got the Hitachi. And the batteries don’t go dead when sitting for a month or two.

Glues – CA glue(thin & thick), Yellow wood glue, Gorilla Glue, and Epoxy. Then teach them when to use each one. Include a 2×2 Post-It pad and a pill bottle of toothpicks. Toothpicks for stirring the Epoxy and for fixing loose wood screws.

Clamps - Maybe a couple of 6” or 9” bar clamps, and a couple of spring clamps.

Screwdrivers – If you have a lathe, turn one of those 5 in one screwdrivers from Rockler. Use Cocobolo or something exotic for the handle. They will cherish that one more than the rest since you made it yourself.

Magnets - How about a small packet of Rare Earth magnets. Maybe also one of those collapsable wands with a magnet on the end.

Oh, and one of the flowerdy hammers with the 4 screwdrivers in the handle. This is for style points only.

-- Backer boards, stop blocks, build oversized, and never buy a hand plane--

View Stuey's profile

Stuey

43 posts in 1702 days


#39 posted 09-24-2011 08:52 PM

If you get them a drill/driver and change your mind and go cordless, look at the Dewalt 12V models. I have medium-sized hands and prefer the smaller sizes grip of these versions, and assume that smaller hands may find them more preferable as well.

I’m curious to see what the final list will be. In any case, here are my recommendations:

12 or 16oz smooth-face claw hammer
small rubber mallet or non-marring 2-face mallet
standard utility knife with a few spare blades
safety glasses or goggles
disposable ear plugs #2 Phillips screwdriver
1/4” slotted screwdriver
multi-bit all-in-one screwdriver
needlenose pliers
combination pliers
wire strippers with combination cutters
6-piece precision screwdriver set
LED flashlight, (2AA?)
duct tape in their favorite color (Duck Brand)
hex key set (metric and SAE)
scissors or shears
16’ tape measure
8” adjustable wrench
6” adustable wrench (b/c sometimes you need a second one)
nylon zip ties

Wrenches and a small socket set might be handy as well, but will add to weight and cost. Similarly a small saw might be worthwhile, but larger saws will be easier to handle. But these aren’t as frequently used for random general purpose tasks.

-- http://toolguyd.com

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