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View Patrik's profile

Am I doing the right thing here? First 5 powertools.

by Patrik
posted 1092 days ago


32 replies so far

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12239 posts in 2684 days


#1 posted 1092 days ago

Interesting. Any thoughts about a circular saw. What about hand tools?

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View Patrik's profile

Patrik

13 posts in 1096 days


#2 posted 1092 days ago

Heyllo Wayne!

The handtools will be a seperate topic itself, as it’s so wide – as an example, there are carpenter chisels, and fine woodwork chisels, so I will have to come back to that one when I’m further in the “hands on” try-out.

Greetings, Patrik

-- If people concentrated on the really important stuff in life, there'd be a shortage of fishing rods.

View Loren's profile

Loren

7171 posts in 2234 days


#3 posted 1092 days ago

Festool is good stuff and it does hold resale value. I have a
bunch of pieces of Festool kit and it’s all very well thought out
and the jigsaw is, as claimed, almost free of vibration in use.

I don’t own a Festool cordless drill, and my main reasons are
that it’s very spendy for what you get and the battery doesn’t
work with anything else. I have Milwaukee drill now and
the battery is robust enough to drive a circular saw, which is
nice, but also a reciprocating saw, which I’ve found more useful
than expected.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View TheWoodNerd's profile

TheWoodNerd

288 posts in 1778 days


#4 posted 1092 days ago

My first Festool was the T-15 drill. I absolutely love it, although it didn’t really start out that way. The interchangeable chucks have proven to be far more valuable than I would have expected.

See the whole story at http://www.thewoodnerd.com/reviews/festoolT15.html

You might really want to consider the OF1400 instead of the 2200. The 2200 is a beast, but unless you really you need that much power in a handheld router the 1400 is easier to manage, both in terms of weight and $$$. Generally, high HP routers live in a table which is really a waste for the 2200.

-- The Wood Nerd -- http://www.workshopaholic.net

View Patrik's profile

Patrik

13 posts in 1096 days


#5 posted 1090 days ago

Thanks guys, I will try the 1400 and the 2200 to see IRL. Loren, regaring the circular saw I don’t know if I will need a carpenter model (thicker, more rigid blade) or a woodworker one (ie festool with thinner blade)

-One surprise that came out of this thread was the WD-40 tips on woodnerds page, never knew you could use it that way. Thanks! :-)

Patrik.

-- If people concentrated on the really important stuff in life, there'd be a shortage of fishing rods.

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5377 posts in 1819 days


#6 posted 1090 days ago

As a counter point to the assertion of spending more than you plan on tools is the quote..

“A fool and his money are soon parted.”

Don’t buy on brand name alone or you will end up with a garage full of overpriced tools that may not work the way you had expected.

Dive into the forums, learn to use the search features of the various ones, and seek out the various reviews and what the chatter about specific tools is… Of course you can fill your space with Festool, and that’s great, but horridly expensive for most of us. Shop wisely and you will not only be happy with your tools, but you will have money left over for more wood!

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View richgreer's profile

richgreer

4522 posts in 1661 days


#7 posted 1090 days ago

I own many of the tools you are considering.

I will second the recommendation on the OF1400. It’s a great, easy to handle, router. I also own an older OF 2000 (predecessor to the 2200) and I very seldom use it. I own 6 routers and my OF1400 is always my first choice for situations that require a plunge router.

I also advise the Rotex 125 as opposed to the 150. It’s easier to handle and it is all the sander you will ever need.

I don’t see the need for the big dust extractor. The midi works just as well. IMO – the only down side is that the midi will need to have its bag changed more frequently. That is not a big deal and the smaller dust extractors are more portable. I own both a midi and a mini.

The jigsaw is a great tool but it is not a replacement for a circular saw. I assume you do not have a table saw and a Festool plunge saw is almost as good as a table saw for many (but not all) applications. As you might expect, I recommend TS-55 (not the 75) because it is easier to handle.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

View TheWoodNerd's profile

TheWoodNerd

288 posts in 1778 days


#8 posted 1090 days ago

My thinking on the DE is just the opposite. On a per-gallon basis, the large CT bags are like half the cost of the mini/midi bags. The savings may be even more dramatic now that the self-cleaning bags are available for the smaller models, I haven’t looked to see the cost yet. Upgrading a mini/midi to HEPA is also a bit pricy and I’m becoming a lot more protective of my lungs these days. Overall, the only reason I see for getting the smaller models would be if you just don’t have the space. Same argument applies to the 26 vs 36, I’d recommend going all the way to the top of the line because of the bag costs.

My detailed look at the CT26: http://www.thewoodnerd.com/reviews/festoolCT26E.html

-- The Wood Nerd -- http://www.workshopaholic.net

View EvilNuff's profile

EvilNuff

58 posts in 1214 days


#9 posted 1090 days ago

I would get the tablesaw before the Carvex. Controlled angles (even just 90o) angles are quite difficult without a table saw. Personally I find them more accurate and flexible than a chop saw.

View live4ever's profile

live4ever

982 posts in 1597 days


#10 posted 1090 days ago

Is a tracksaw on your list?

-- Optimists are usually disappointed. Pessimists are either right or pleasantly surprised. I tend to be a disappointed pessimist.

View crank49's profile

crank49

3325 posts in 1557 days


#11 posted 1090 days ago

I’m sorry, I just can’t see how to justify any Festool product. I guess this comes from working for Mersedes at one point in my carreer. I came to realize that “German Quality” was a complete myth. It’s like a sugar pill, a placebo. You think because it is the most expensive wiget around it must be the best. And they have the sales and marketing clout to be sure you feel good about coming to that conclusion. Fact is, their parts come from the exact same suppliers as everybody elses. And the German production machines we had were total crap.

For what you’re planning to spend on a few portable boutique tools, I could fully equip a real shop. Or, if portable is an absolute requirement I’d have multiple backups of all the top rated normal tools, like Mikita, Bosch, Dewalt, Millwaukee, etc. and still have money left.

Not wanting to step on anyone’s toes here, I just don’t understand the logic. Maybe someone could enlighten me.

-- Michael :-{| “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” ― A H

View Don W's profile

Don W

14498 posts in 1154 days


#12 posted 1090 days ago

you can certainly buy a portable tablesaw. The portable today work really well. I don’t see a circular saw on your list. I would think that would need to be in the first list. Also if your going to remodel kitchens, you’ll need a sawzall. Period. Look at a cordless “kit”. I’m not sure the circular saws in the cordless kit would be good enough for me, but its better than not having one.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View Patrik's profile

Patrik

13 posts in 1096 days


#13 posted 1090 days ago

Thanks for the input guys!

Just a few side-notes: Crank, I actually have a friend that has owned 3 different Mercedes (2003, 2007, 2009) and each and every of them has had electrical problems! He has sworn to never buy another one before they “get their thumbs out of their b*uts and start producing quality again” :-)

DbHost, There are 13 guys on every dozen here that will produce far better stuff than me, with far cheaper equipment – I’m a newbee! :-)

Just rather starting in the right end, and for me that is highy portable, quiet and dustfree (“dustfree” is in total fairness not true, so lets call it less dusty! ;-)

Evilnuf and Don W – You are both recommending a tablesaw, and Richgreer votes for the TS-55 vs the tablesaw – that is a perfect sample that show that both recommendations are true, and that both fill a puropse, so the real question is rather: What purpose will you use the machine for, and then go decide.

I was just eyeing the Incra wonderfence today: http://www.incra.com/product_rtf_wf37.htm
- Wich would be an absolute madness in a carpenters enviroment, but make full sense in a woodwork enviroment. – Decisions decisions… I will let you guys know how the chips fall in september when I will be ordering my first batch, and also in november/december where my second batch will be – there might have been a complete change in that batch by then. It’s intresting times ahead, so thanks for ALL the good input! :-)

Best regards, Patrik

-- If people concentrated on the really important stuff in life, there'd be a shortage of fishing rods.

View TheWoodNerd's profile

TheWoodNerd

288 posts in 1778 days


#14 posted 1090 days ago

I’m sorry, I just can’t see how to justify any Festool product

Not to be snide, but it’s because you haven’t used one.

Festools are head-and-shoulders better than most comparable products. Now, is a given tool three times better because it’s three times the cost? No, of course not. Quality/performance is an exponential factor. The first 75% of what a tool can do/be is the easy and cheap part, that’s where Harbor Freight lives. Improvements beyond that are progressively more difficult and costly.

As an example, probably like you, a couple years ago I thought you’d have to be insane to pay $600 for a cordless drill. I had just spent several weeks buying 7 different cordless drills, including Bosch, Milwaukee, etc and found them all lacking. Then, because I could return it for 30 days with no questions, I tried a Festool T15. What an eye-opener, I didn’t think a drill could be worth that much because I had never knew such a drill could exist. If you’re curious about the details, see http://www.thewoodnerd.com/reviews/festoolT15.html

I’m sure you’re familiar with the satisfaction of using quality tools vs cheap ones. Just imagine another step up and you have the Festool experience.

-- The Wood Nerd -- http://www.workshopaholic.net

View Arch_E's profile

Arch_E

47 posts in 1109 days


#15 posted 1090 days ago

CMS, slider, would be my first suggestion for jobsite work, along with circ, jigsaw, handdrills, etc. If dust extraction indoors IS critical, Fein or Festool represent the best.

I envy your spunk, ambition, and finances to buy such top quality tools. However, consider paying cash along the way rather than borrowing to start a business. The Makita 18v set is tops, but not the biggest or best of all drills: the batteries just keep working. Hand tools, strategically used—such a hand brace for auger bit boring—will keep you from wearing down batteries or needing a worksite generator. If you bought every Bosch tool (just using this as an illustration not as a recommendation) rather than Festool, you could cut your initial tool outlay by 50% minimum, with some tools even more savings. However, I’m impressed with most Festool tools. They’re good, so my friends say. Hoss routers need tables; jobsite routers need a steady hand—so softstart and less powerful routers, if not overtaxed, might do the trick. Do stay away typical homeowner power tools. They work okay, for a while. Buy right, buy once! That, I do believe. However, for a business venture buy your tools based upon what’s needed for just that first project, then second, etc.

View richgreer's profile

richgreer

4522 posts in 1661 days


#16 posted 1090 days ago

I have no desire to engage in an argument with anyone but I will say that The WoodNerd and I have an honest difference of opinion.

Yes, the cost of the bags, on per gallon basis, is lower for the CT 36, but you will have to go through a lot of bags to pay for the extra $165 for the CT36.

In general, Festool DEs are not picking up the high volume saw dust that you get in a typical dust collector. You do not use them to collect saw dust and chips from your lathe, table saw or drill press. They are usually picking up fine saw dust from sanders and courser saw dust from circular saws. With my midi, I can go a pretty long time between changing bags.

I have not done the math, but I suspect that it would take me 10 years or more to pay for the extra cost of a bigger DE with the savings in the cost of the bags. Of course, this all depends on how much you use the machine.

As an FYI – I bought my midi when the price of the midi was lower. Recently, Festool raised the price of the midi and mini and did not raise the price on the bigger units. I bought my mini used at a bargain price. I like being able to have 2 DEs connected to 2 different tools.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

View Cosmicsniper's profile

Cosmicsniper

2199 posts in 1745 days


#17 posted 1090 days ago

I own zero Festool products, but I could see how I’d want a dust collector or sander because they could do things that likely other setups could NOT do. I’m not sure I understand what their miter saw, track saw, routers, or drills can do that others cannot do? Not talking about aesthetics and feel here (that is often worth the price alone). I’m talking about whether a job gets done, or not.

I can use my 20v LiIon Craftsman drill to drive a 3” screw. Or I could use the T15 to do that same taskfor a whole lot more. My Craftsman drill was in a combo kit that also came with a circular saw…and if I clamp a board down, it’s like a track saw. I can even plunge cut with it I want. Of course these aren’t elegant solutions and certainly not as efficient as the Festools, but at the end of the day, I completed the same job. I probably save time and enjoy the experience much more with the Festool, but that 3” screw still got screwed. :)

So, my thinking here, for use on a job site, would be to select Festool for those things that there really is no other substitute (sander and dust collector)...and maybe save money on tasks that can do done with “lesser” but still capable tools.

-- jay, www.allaboutastro.com

View Cosmicsniper's profile

Cosmicsniper

2199 posts in 1745 days


#18 posted 1090 days ago

By the way, I know that my cordless circ saw is no comparison to a corded Festool, but if I need a beefier saw, I could use a classic worm-drive Skil saw. It was just an illustration.

-- jay, www.allaboutastro.com

View rum's profile

rum

148 posts in 1172 days


#19 posted 1090 days ago

+1 on a CMS, something in a 10” slider would be high on my list. Get a folding stand for it if you need to move around a lot and can’t put it in a fixed location (I have the rigid stand and really really like it for portability and flexibility, m only regret there is not getting it years ago). If you can possibly swing it a table saw might be even better, but I understand the space/dust limitations cause some conflict there.

Also +1 to cordless drill/sawzall kit. I have a ~10yr old dewalt 14v set and am still pleased as punch with the drill and the sawzall (the cordless skilsaw is better imho replaced by a handsaw or two, gutless, I think describes all of the ones I’ve seen). Don’t cheap here the difference between the crappy whir whir drill and one of the higher end ones like woodnerd reviewed are night and day. Imho I’d be hard pressed to justify festool here based on what I have which works fantastically (although those replaceable chucks look sweeeeet dang I wish I hadn’t clicked that link; now I’m thinking… sigh). I keep meaning to get a corded sawzall but the wireless one has been more than good enough for years so I can’t justify it – which is a good vote for that as I beat the heck out of mine.

vacuum: I have the CT26 and would have a hard time justifying the 36 to myself. The 26 does everything I want in that category and more. The slightly larger bag meh, unless you work much faster than me (possible :D) you won't empty it more than once a day anyway. The reusable bag is a good investment, the regular bags can add up quick (save the non-reusable for really fine dust like drywall that will clog up the hepa). One caveat, budget for some attachments, it doesn't come with any unless you get a bundle (this made me slightly grumpy when I got mine but I've gotten over it - also note the 26 comes with the smaller hose, upgrade the hose size when you buy attachments and your dust problems will reduce a bit more).

Be aware that even with the festool stuff you are a long ways from dust free. It is vastly better than anything else I've used, but there are still going to be little bits of wood floating around.

Also +1 on the 1400, many of the festool accessory jigs won't even work with the 2200 and some are even "happier" with the 1010 even (i.e. the shelf pin jig is simple as all get out on the 1010 but requires you to use some small bolts to attach it to the 1400).

I do love my TS75 (I had some think benches to cut so I got the 75 for the deeper cut instead of the 55, so far I don't find it overly hard to handle but I'm a weekend user so YMMV), but would be hard pressed to recommend it as an intro tool There are some +'s and -'s to it: pros: - imho still the best way to reduce large heavy sheets of plywood to manageable sizes. I would hate to live w/o it at this point for that reason.... - snap on accurate. cons: - consumables (blades, the anti splinter thingy) are expensive - not great for solid wood crosscuts (depends on what other tools you have if this matters much) - really really really needs the rails which limits its use to mostly large pieces and sheet goods, the plunge base is "squirrelly" is the only word I can think of w/o the rails. makes me nervous, don't like being nervous. Others might rightly argue that anything you can't use the rails for is to small to be safely cut w/ a circular saw anyway.

I still use my 20+yr old skilsaw when I'm out lopping off the ends of a deck board though because of these reasons. The festool tends to stay in the shop and be mostly limited to sheet good breakdown.

Other things: - saw horses, get some decent folding saw horses (i.e. not plastic!). I'm sure many will disagree but I like the yellow metal folding ones from HD, they're pretty tough and fold up small. You just have to pay attention and not cut into them :D I stole and idea (from someone on here maybe even?) to build an open "cut" table out of some 1/2 lapped 2x4s to set on top of the sawhorses. Huge win in functionality - thanks to whomever suggested that if you're on here :). Also screwing a 2x4 to the top helps the oops factor. - chisels - yep, get some. I am happy with the Narex set than lee valley sells, other folks seem to like them mostly as well. - a small block plane, you'll be glad to have this when you have to shave that little bit off to make it fit (eventually you'll "need" several dozen planes... sigh.. but this would be my first replacement). - hammers (mallet, claw and finish) - nailsets (get a set of three) - handsaws preferably a rip and a crosscut and maybe a smaller backsaw, to start w/ just get a "disposable" from your local bigbox. The quality difference in disposable saws isn't significant imho (disposable case hardened teeth so not re-sharpenable, you won’t get into a handsaw for less than $100 unless you find old tools or buy disposable. Getting old tools or higher end is a whole nother mess – yes go there eventually, but thrash a trasher learning) – measuring tools – get a framing square, a rafter square, a decent tape measure and a hard 3’ rule. – you’ll find more :P

When deciding what to buy tool wise figure out what you really need and get that. To do this a good way is to take your top (say) 5 projects and work through them end to end and see what tool would work best for each step.

Lets do a couple of simple examples:

some trim around a room: – sanding – easiest with flexible hand sanding block (unless you have a really spif power sander like a fein maybe, but even then..) – 45d outside cut for outside corner or around the top of the door – mitre saw (either manual or power – I found a really sweet only stanley manual at a salvation army attic a few months back for $5 – with a good blade even). Wouldn’t even try this with a jigsaw, would consider a handheld backsaw freehand if thats what I had. – cut two pieces like / to join in the middle of a wall – mitre saw (as above) possibly handsaw or with rollers and a mitre gauge a table saw (pretty sketchy but doable). – coped inside cut – jigsaw or coping saw. Tough call here actually, I kind of prefer using a coping saw personally, I tend to get a better cut and am less likely to ruin the piece (jigsaw zooom oh crap!) - rip piece to fit between doorframe and wall (jam is to close to L on wall to fit a full width piece of trim). table saw or possibly hand plane to fit (something like a jack plane would work ok here). - nailing - finish nailer + pin nailer (requires compressor); have done by hand with a hammer but don't want to repeat that :)

Deck: - Cut posts to length - skilsaw (if already set), cms (if not), crosscut handsaw (either case) - cut boards to length - mitre saw, crosscut handsaw, skilsaw (here is where a tracksaw is slower but useable if you setup the board to trim between two other pieces to support the track.. thus why I still freehand with the old timer). - trim board ends once laid - skilsaw (or tracksaw) - rip board lengthwise to fit - tablesaw, hand ripsaw - cut facia boards at an / to go around a non 90 corner (sure is a fancy deck you got there :P) - mitre saw, skilsaw, handsaw - cut a notch around a post/wall trim - jigsaw, handsaw + chisel, skilsaw + chisel, possibly a sliding cms with a depth stop (heh I use the depth stop and slide slide slide to waste away wood for 1/2 laps, etc.. more than I ought). - lengthwise angle cut (say for a rail support or to fit along the wall for angled ) - tablesaw, skilsaw, hand ripsaw - fastening bolts - hammer drill - just don't break the bolts :D (yeah yeah handheld socket driver). - screwing boards down - power drill with adjustable torque (so you don't break the screws off)

Definitely missing some things there, but you get the idea... There are lots of good instructions around, walk yourself through them several ways and see what ends up falling out. There are only two things I don't like about buying tools: - buying a tool I never use - not having a tool I really need - deciding which tool to get (ok thats three but maybe I don't mind this one so much :P)

Last piece of advice I wish someone had told me years ago: get good sandpaper, the cheap stuff ain't worth the time. Although a couple of card scrapers is even faster for most stuff, but still... good sandpaper vastly reduced time/annoyance.

View ferstler's profile

ferstler

333 posts in 2107 days


#20 posted 1089 days ago

If you plan on doing a lot of work and the “feel” of certain tools is as important to you as just getting the job done, and you have money to burn, then go the Festool and other super-premium tool route and be happy.

When other woodworkers come over to your place and you show them those tools, well, they will be impressed and that may mean more to you than production values. Of course, given that you have those tools on hand, those same guys are going to want to see what you have built, and considering the cost of those tools you had better have some spectacular finished products also on hand to show them.

Actually, I rather doubt that the Festool drill can drill a hole any cleaner than any number of other models, including some of the cheaper brands, even if they do not have the smooth feel of the expensive versions. The drill bit is what matters here. Ditto with a table saw or circular saw or saber saw, or whatever. It is the blade that matters in those cases, once a certain saw-quality level is reached (and most good brands are at least good enough), and you can buy a lot of premium blades and bits (and quality wood to cut, drill and build with) with the money saved by just purchasing “good” tools instead of some ego-boosting, super-prestige jobs.

Howard Ferstler

View Vrtigo1's profile

Vrtigo1

430 posts in 1578 days


#21 posted 1088 days ago

I would also recommend adding a track saw such as the TS55 to your list. I’m not entirely sure what type of work you will be doing, but for breaking down sheet goods, the time saved with a track saw will pay for itself very quickly. You can do a lot of stuff with the TS55 that you would normally not be able to do without a table saw. That’s not to say that you can use a track saw as a table saw replacement, but they are definitely very handy. I have a very nice table saw and am definitely looking at picking up a TS55 as soon as I can afford it just for the convenience of breaking down sheet goods.

You already have a dust extractor on the list, which is good. A lot of folks either don’t see the need, or (in my case) can’t bring themselves to shell out the cash for one. That’s another thing that’s on my list, but there are always things higher on the list.

I would also second the recommendation for a CMS. They’re very handy for cutting stock to length, and if you’re going to be doing any mitered work, you pretty much have to have one since you don’t have a table saw. I agree with the recommendation to get one with a folding stand if you need to be mobile.

View bubinga's profile

bubinga

861 posts in 1254 days


#22 posted 1088 days ago

Festool, are high quality, nice tools, but are “NOT” the best bang for you bucks

-- E J ------- Always Keep a Firm Grip on Your Tool

View richgreer's profile

richgreer

4522 posts in 1661 days


#23 posted 1088 days ago

In defense of Festool

I don’t do woodworking to make money. I do it because I enjoy it. I enjoy the process as much, if not more, than the completed project. This is a very enjoyable hobby for me.

I cannot cost justify a Festool – but I don’t have to. Can a hunter or fisherman cost justify that expensive gun or boat? Can a golfer justify his/her very expensive clubs? With respect to these hobbies, no one would think about cost justifying their purchases. I feel the same way about my tools.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1280 days


#24 posted 1088 days ago

Well, those are all quality tools, no mistake about that. It’d be a very unusual choice for my first 5 tools. A very expensive first 5 tools, but ones that should definitely serve you for a long time. My first 5 would probably be TS, planer, jointer, router table/shaper, and something else.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12239 posts in 2684 days


#25 posted 1088 days ago

Wait. I though Chris Schwarz said you only need 3 power tools….lol Your two over quota.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1280 days


#26 posted 1088 days ago

Wayne, if I had a chest full of Marcous and Japanese damascus, I’d only need three powertools, too: Lights, A/C, and a radio.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View Don W's profile

Don W

14498 posts in 1154 days


#27 posted 1088 days ago

actually a bottle of Jack and I become a powertool.

there can be a fine line between carpentry and woodworking, but in my opinion, decks, kitchens and fencing is more carpentry than woodworking. I likie them both, and do both as a hobby now. My first 5 for carpentry would be table saw, skil saw (circular saw) jig saw, vacume, cordless drill or impact.

for woodworking it changes. Circular become way less important, although I wouldn’t want to give mine up, and everything else would depend on available hand tools. Its also a question of “are you planning a job or a hobby”. Trying to make money takes more of a thought into time.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1280 days


#28 posted 1088 days ago

I wouldn’t necessarily start my professional pursuits with thousands of dollars worth of Festool. No need to attack me, Festool freaks! They’re great tools, but any tool expense for a pro usually requires revenue to justify. If they’re noticeably faster, that may be all the justification required. I’m with DW, if I was a fencebuilder, I’d be looking at chopsaws (maybe even the Kapex), not high quality mobile dust extractors and superb quality sanders.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View Greedo's profile

Greedo

465 posts in 1547 days


#29 posted 1088 days ago

i wouldn’t want the rotex 150 and certainly not the “underpowered” 125 as my only or first sander, instead i use my ETS 150/5 95% of the time because it is light, silent, ergonomic and powerfull. but for certain rough tasks or polishing i will reach for my RO 150, but as soon as the ETS can take over, then the RO goes back in it’s box. it’s just too tiring to hold and use, when i grab the ETS after using the RO i feel like it’s virtually weight less, a dream to use.

the rest of your selection seems good to me, i heard of many users who both have the OF 1400 and 2200, that they prefer the combination of 1010 and 2200.

View Cosmicsniper's profile

Cosmicsniper

2199 posts in 1745 days


#30 posted 1088 days ago

Rich:

I agree totally…I’ve spent tons of money on my hobbies…You guys don’t want to know how much that scope setup costs in my avatar. LOL!

I think the point, though, is that if you are starting up a business (or otherwise) doing the majority of your projects onsite, and you obviously have some money to put into it, then I think there are better choices than boutique tools.

A Ridgid table saw on portable stand, SCMS, reciprocating saw (for demolitions), a Fein Multitool, drills (plural), router, a good sander (where Festool would likely win the day for me)...so many tools you’d need. I think it’s silly to limit oneself to 5 power tools. Don’t know if the OP is serious about that or just mentioned as a point of discussion – I assume the latter rather than the former – but I’d take all that Festool money and spread it over all the tools you’ll certainly need.

Heck, call me old fashioned, but I don’t even see the need for dust extraction if most of what you do is outdoors. Now I know that the OP has said he can do some woodworking in an “empty room,” but in that case I’d opt for a portable, actual DC instead…2 hp Harbor Freight anybody?

-- jay, www.allaboutastro.com

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bubinga

861 posts in 1254 days


#31 posted 1088 days ago

I don’t even see the need for dust extraction if most of what you do is outdoors.
Well ! I don’t have dust collection on my chainsaw ;)

-- E J ------- Always Keep a Firm Grip on Your Tool

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Tootles

674 posts in 1088 days


#32 posted 1087 days ago

I do not own, but have recently used a Festool vacuum / dust extractor (not sure which model) and a Festool 1010 W router. I was impressed with both.

The really nice feature on the dust extractor was that it has a power socket into which you plug the power tool that you are using. (1) it gives you an additional power socket, potentially at the end of an extension cord, so there is no need for a double adaptor or multi-plug power board. (2) It gives you additional length to your power cord. (3) when the dust extractor is in auto mode, it starts and stops automatically shortly after you start and stop using your power tool, so that is one less thing for you to manage.

I didn’t have a lot of experience with routers before I used the Festools router, but I reall liked it. (1) This is a feature of all the Festool machines, but the power cord disconnects at the handle. This is useful for changing from one tool to the next. More importantly, it makes it easy to disconnect power when you are making adjustments or changing bits – so you do tend to disconnect and this works out to be a great safety feature. (2) I really liked the pistol grip on the 1010 & 1400 routers. I felt that it gave me really good control of the router – certainly better than the router that I have used previously with handles similar to the 2200 router, though that may also be because the one I used previously didn’t have a soft start or speed control and felt a bit big, heavy and even a little scary (I was only 16 at the time!). If I had one criticism of the 1010, and from the pictures I’ve seen the 1400 is similar, I did occasionally find that the dust extraction hose got in the way. I had to toss it over my shoulder to keep it from fouling the work. From the picture of the 2200, that looks different and porbably better.

-- I may have lost my marbles, but I still have my love of woodworking

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