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How did you ever go so long without it?

by live4ever
posted 07-13-2011 10:34 PM


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66 replies

66 replies so far

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1350 days


#1 posted 07-13-2011 10:35 PM

TiteMark wheel. Stanley #7.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

9924 posts in 1275 days


#2 posted 07-13-2011 10:41 PM

Workbench, hands down. Pursued the build on a whim, and it changed my life by ushering in handplanes of all types, chisels, handsaws and associated joinery.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12290 posts in 2754 days


#3 posted 07-13-2011 10:45 PM

Air Compressor and nail guns…

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1350 days


#4 posted 07-13-2011 10:53 PM

^can I change my answer to Wayne’s;) For jig making, Titebond, a nailgun, two minutes and you’re using it? Can’t beat that.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

9924 posts in 1275 days


#5 posted 07-13-2011 10:58 PM

Al – pls keep your eyes on your own paper… :-)

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

View live4ever's profile

live4ever

983 posts in 1667 days


#6 posted 07-13-2011 10:59 PM

Hmm, I ought to use a nailgun more. I just never whip it out because my compressor makes such a racket.

-- Optimists are usually disappointed. Pessimists are either right or pleasantly surprised. I tend to be a disappointed pessimist.

View live4ever's profile

live4ever

983 posts in 1667 days


#7 posted 07-13-2011 11:00 PM

I just got an impact driver, never felt like I needed one. How did I ever drive screws without it?

-- Optimists are usually disappointed. Pessimists are either right or pleasantly surprised. I tend to be a disappointed pessimist.

View SCOTSMAN's profile

SCOTSMAN

5373 posts in 2242 days


#8 posted 07-13-2011 11:16 PM

I just bought a new impact driver and chucked drill from, dewalt both 18v I too am amazed with the power of the impact driver. Alistair

-- excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

View Cosmicsniper's profile

Cosmicsniper

2199 posts in 1815 days


#9 posted 07-13-2011 11:41 PM

Incra TS-LS fence for the table saw.

-- jay, www.allaboutastro.com

View tyskkvinna's profile

tyskkvinna

1308 posts in 1643 days


#10 posted 07-14-2011 04:39 AM

Planer, for sure. Being able to use “any piece of wood” radically changed my world.

-- Lis - Michigan - http://www.missmooseart.com - https://www.etsy.com/people/lisbokt

View ShopTinker's profile

ShopTinker

878 posts in 1425 days


#11 posted 07-14-2011 04:44 AM

Definitely my DeWalt 14 volt impact. I still remember the first time I used it. I was hanging cabinets and driving 3” screws. After nearly 30 years of driving screws with a drill I was truly amazed at the ease and power of the impact.

-- Dan - Valparaiso, Indiana, "A smart man changes his mind, a fool never does."

View Manitario's profile

Manitario

2347 posts in 1540 days


#12 posted 07-14-2011 04:46 AM

I’m just starting to use handplanes and I love them, and hope to never have to use a sander again.

-- Sometimes the creative process requires foul language. -- Charles Neil

View lew's profile

lew

10034 posts in 2412 days


#13 posted 07-14-2011 04:47 AM

Remote control starter for the dust collector

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View Bernie's profile

Bernie

414 posts in 1494 days


#14 posted 07-14-2011 04:53 AM

Cabinet scraper – most simple tool which was replaced by sandpaper. It has now become woodworking best kept secret. When gluing up projects and the joint has a slight defect, I used to try sanding out the defect and often made it worse. A card scraper shaves off the defect quite effectively leaving a smooth flawless joint and much quicker then sanding. How about burn marks on rip cuts? I used to try sanding these eye sores out. It would take a long time and usually ended with a wavy edge. Cabinet (card) scrapers do a good job in less then a minute.

The hardest thing about these historic tools is learning how to sharpen them. Google the technique and learn. It’s worth the effort. Took me a few trials and I’m glad I learned.

-- Bernie: It never gets hot or cold in New Hampshire, just seasonal!

View Dark_Lightning's profile

Dark_Lightning

1722 posts in 1766 days


#15 posted 07-14-2011 05:01 AM

Pneumatic nailer. I started a 650 square foot home addition in 1988, and got nerve injury driving 16- and 20-d nails into the girders (using a two-pound hammer, I don’t have a lot of patience), joists and blocking all in one weekend. I borrowed it from my B-I-L, who was a contractor. He offered, but I wanted to be independent. After a weekend of nailing, I caved in and borrowed it. It made the framing a TON easier. I gave it back in good shape. Now, I use a brad nailer for small stuff. There are some other good suggestions here.

View Tedstor's profile

Tedstor

1369 posts in 1289 days


#16 posted 07-14-2011 05:08 AM

Sawbench. I didn’t think I’d use it much when I made it. As it turns out, I use it all the time for many different functions.

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12290 posts in 2754 days


#17 posted 07-14-2011 05:10 AM

I’m looking forward to making a pair of Sawbenches. I got a pair of hold downs to use in the benches today.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View RGtools's profile

RGtools

3302 posts in 1311 days


#18 posted 07-14-2011 05:10 AM

Tool: Starrett Combination square. Dead on accuracy is worth it.

Technique: Cambered blades for jointer planes, nothing makes jointing an edge faster.

Accessory: Saw bench, dear god ripping is more fun now.

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

View live4ever's profile

live4ever

983 posts in 1667 days


#19 posted 07-14-2011 07:10 AM

Bernie speaks the truth.

-- Optimists are usually disappointed. Pessimists are either right or pleasantly surprised. I tend to be a disappointed pessimist.

View felkadelic's profile

felkadelic

193 posts in 1197 days


#20 posted 07-14-2011 07:25 AM

Impact driver. Got it a couple weeks ago to speed up the process of installing some things around the house. So great to not have to repeatedly switch between a drill bit and a driver in a single drill.

View David Grimes's profile

David Grimes

2072 posts in 1296 days


#21 posted 07-14-2011 07:57 AM

Bunn coffee maker. No doubt about it.

-- If you're going to stir the pot, think BIG spoon or SMALL boat paddle. David Grimes, Georgia

View live4ever's profile

live4ever

983 posts in 1667 days


#22 posted 07-14-2011 08:09 AM

Could it be THAT much better than my Mr. Coffee?

-- Optimists are usually disappointed. Pessimists are either right or pleasantly surprised. I tend to be a disappointed pessimist.

View David Grimes's profile

David Grimes

2072 posts in 1296 days


#23 posted 07-14-2011 08:55 AM

@live4ever, Less than 2 minutes to make 12 cups. Gravity feed (we have extremely hard water here… calcium)... truck driver approved for over 50 years !!! lol and best of all… imagine this if you can… the carafe will POUR without errantly dripping NAIR ONE stray drop. Someone DESIGNED something that works perfectly many years ago and the young turks didn’t reinvent it into uselessness. Can you believe that ?

-- If you're going to stir the pot, think BIG spoon or SMALL boat paddle. David Grimes, Georgia

View live4ever's profile

live4ever

983 posts in 1667 days


#24 posted 07-14-2011 09:17 AM

lol, I’d have to see it to believe it.

Aaaaand I’m guessing your Bunn has something to do with why you’re awake at what, 3AM EST? It’s only midnight here…

-- Optimists are usually disappointed. Pessimists are either right or pleasantly surprised. I tend to be a disappointed pessimist.

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

6938 posts in 1571 days


#25 posted 07-14-2011 12:55 PM

Dust Collector—Geez what a difference! Not perfect but still WOW! I almost, well sometimes, I mean once in awhile, will go out in the shop just to make a mess and watch how the DC sucks up the mess before it’s a mess. Definitely a life changer (extender?).

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View Don W's profile

Don W

15037 posts in 1224 days


#26 posted 07-14-2011 01:07 PM

hands down, my workshop!

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View jim C's profile

jim C

1452 posts in 1755 days


#27 posted 07-14-2011 02:13 PM

Oscillating spindle sander
Impact driver
Pocket hole jig

-- When I was a boy, I was told "anyone can be President", now I'm beginning to believe it!

View Verna's profile

Verna

202 posts in 1430 days


#28 posted 07-14-2011 02:48 PM

A dedicated workshop—one that doesn’t share the garage with my truck, one that has a dust collector to keep the sawdust at a minimum, one that has central A/C and heat, one that beckens me….one I should be in right now!!!!

-- Verna -- Indianapolis, IN

View Rick  Dennington's profile

Rick Dennington

3407 posts in 1851 days


#29 posted 07-14-2011 05:04 PM

All of the above mentioned items I have….from the stand-alone shop chocked full of tools.

I have a bunn warmer in my truck…...I have a rich wife…What else do I need?

-- " I started with nothing, and I've still got most of it left".......

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2605 posts in 1707 days


#30 posted 07-14-2011 06:47 PM

Maybe I missed it, but has no one mentioned a drum sander yet?! That made a huge difference for me.

I have a feeling that once I get a planer, that’ll make all the difference in the world too. I haven’t necessarily purchased all of my shop tools in the typical order, but I am without my drum sander right now, and boy does it stink having to resort to the belt sander again!

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View Brian024's profile

Brian024

358 posts in 2057 days


#31 posted 07-14-2011 07:05 PM

A second hand drill, saved a ton of time when I used to have to change between a drill bit and driver bit in the same drill or my first ROS sander, which was my first sander of any kind.

View live4ever's profile

live4ever

983 posts in 1667 days


#32 posted 07-14-2011 08:07 PM

@Jonathan – I like to hear you say that, because I just got a drum sander.

Seems like impact drivers commonly are a revelation.

-- Optimists are usually disappointed. Pessimists are either right or pleasantly surprised. I tend to be a disappointed pessimist.

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2605 posts in 1707 days


#33 posted 07-14-2011 08:14 PM

@live4ever – You’ll probably revisit this thread in a couple of months and confirm that!

I think this list will tend to vary widely, as it depends on what your needs are, and what sort of woodworking or construction of projects you focus on. It also depends on if you like hand tools, or power tools, as well as numerous other variables.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View dpop24's profile

dpop24

115 posts in 1226 days


#34 posted 07-14-2011 09:48 PM

Are you guys talking about manual impact drivers or the battery operated ones? I have 2 cordless drills so I don’t have to change bits, but according to Wikipedia, a manual impact driver delivers “downward” force when you bang on it while an electric one does not (maybe it acts more like an impact wrench?).

Anyway, I feel like I’m missing out on something. Is an electric/battery operated impact driver not just like a drill with a driver bit in it? Somebody convince me, I have my credit card in my hand!

-- If it ain't broke, take it apart and find out why

View SCOTSMAN's profile

SCOTSMAN

5373 posts in 2242 days


#35 posted 07-14-2011 10:04 PM

I just hired a young blonde Swedish au pair for my shop.hello Al. Al. wake up.LOL not that I would know what to do with such a valuable asset to my shop maybe she could sweep up LOL .I love my planer thicknesser dewalt nailgun 18v and of course new wadking dimension saw well not new but new to meLOLAlistair

-- excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

View live4ever's profile

live4ever

983 posts in 1667 days


#36 posted 07-14-2011 10:08 PM

dpop24 – We’re talking about the battery-powered ones that you can get in the cordless kits (or separately, but the kits are a good value). The impact drivers provide a hammering force when engaged, in addition to the twist of the bit. Therefore, when you use an impact driver to drive a screw home, you don’t have to apply as much downward force with your arm or body. One of the major benefits is less cam-out. Driving wood or lag screws into studs with one hand while reaching far above your head is one example where an impact becomes priceless.

-- Optimists are usually disappointed. Pessimists are either right or pleasantly surprised. I tend to be a disappointed pessimist.

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

15698 posts in 2875 days


#37 posted 07-14-2011 10:11 PM

First the table saw changed my life, then it was the band saw, then the planer. Each of these have been how-did-I-live-without-it purchases.

David Grimes: I don’t have a Bunn at home, but the one at my office is the last piece of equipment I’d give up!

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1350 days


#38 posted 07-14-2011 10:16 PM

Here to be counted, sworn member of the Bunn club. David, is yours piped in? When you’re hardlined with three caraffe support, you’re the java godfather.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View Don W's profile

Don W

15037 posts in 1224 days


#39 posted 07-14-2011 10:51 PM

see I come from a construction background. If its hot(or at least luke warm) in a cup and black, its coffee. I’m pretty sure some of the stuff I have drank was sun warmed crankcase oil. Its pretty funny working with some of the younger guys I work with these days. It takes them longer to order a cup of coffee than the drive to work. I don’t even understand that verbiage. Large Black please!

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View David Grimes's profile

David Grimes

2072 posts in 1296 days


#40 posted 07-15-2011 12:00 AM

@CharlieM1958, Bertha, and Don W, My name is David and I am an Arabica addict. ;=)

Mine is a single at home and at work, because I’m the only one in the house and office that drinks coffee all day long all year long. Hot coffee in 100 degree weather makes me sweat less than iced anything.

The new carwash in town has a great waiting room (A/C, leather furniture, big screen, etc.) with one of those Bunn three bangers piped in. I have started it up almost every time I’m there. They have Community coffee, which to me isn’t bad, but I am a longtime Arabica addict. I have tried them all, believe me.

With a Bunn you have to possess both Ninja and Matrix mastery to get your first cup when the pot is half filling… you know the one I’m talking about… go to Bitter Blvd., then turn onto Mellow Lane… 2nd house on the right. ;=)

-- If you're going to stir the pot, think BIG spoon or SMALL boat paddle. David Grimes, Georgia

View rsdowdy's profile

rsdowdy

105 posts in 1853 days


#41 posted 07-15-2011 12:45 AM

Rick… sounds to me like you need permission! Heh.

Hmmm… I love my jointer and planer and my table saw and my dust collector and oh no… I don’t have a band saw! Sometimes I hate this place.

Royal

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

15698 posts in 2875 days


#42 posted 07-15-2011 01:59 AM

LOL @ David!

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View jm82435's profile

jm82435

1272 posts in 2399 days


#43 posted 07-15-2011 07:47 PM

Might be my machinist roots, but I would add: calipers and an indicator. Overkill for most projects maybe, but when you need them, there is no substitute.

-- A thing of beauty is a joy forever...

View DrDirt's profile

DrDirt

2446 posts in 2399 days


#44 posted 07-15-2011 11:19 PM

Hey David That second house on the right is the ‘Maxwell house’ and is a fine fine place LOL

-- "If we did all the things we are capable of doing, we would literally astonish ourselves." Edison

View gagewestern's profile

gagewestern

301 posts in 2007 days


#45 posted 07-15-2011 11:43 PM

the first one that comes to mind is a saw-zall

-- gagewestern

View David Grimes's profile

David Grimes

2072 posts in 1296 days


#46 posted 07-16-2011 04:40 AM

@DrDirt, No, man… You’re counting the house on the corner that faces Bitter as #1… Maxwell House is the first house (but it’s empty and the mail is forwarded… and some dude named Sanka drops in from time to time to use the shower).

The neighborhood has been much improved since the Folger’s moved away and the Starbuck’s bought their house. They’re alright, just don’t say anything to them because they use about three times the number of words necessary to say even the simplest thing. I think they’re Belch or something. They ain’t from ‘round here.

-- If you're going to stir the pot, think BIG spoon or SMALL boat paddle. David Grimes, Georgia

View DLCW's profile

DLCW

523 posts in 1311 days


#47 posted 07-16-2011 11:31 PM

CNC machine.

I can now do things I’ve done by hand in the past in a matter of minutes instead of hours or days. Huge time saver for me – translates into savings for the customer. Quality has not suffered at all.

-- Don, Diamond Lake Custom Woodworks - http://www.dlwoodworks.com - "If you make something idiot proof, all they do is make a better idiot"

View turtlepan's profile

turtlepan

44 posts in 1173 days


#48 posted 07-17-2011 05:30 AM

HA! being new to the world of woodworking, I would like to have … I mean NEED to have most of the tools mentioned! Some of them I never heard of, or do not know the use of it! I need to get into the books, and then the bank!! Need a loan, line of credit … credit cards !! Oh and a shop! just doing it all in the basement right now, and a spare room!

-- John in GP

View RGtools's profile

RGtools

3302 posts in 1311 days


#49 posted 07-17-2011 04:47 PM

Turtle. Save yourself some serious cash. Grab a copy of The Anarchists Tool Chest. Knowing what you need early on is a valuable asset.

Get good tools from the start as save your money in the long haul…you’ll need it for wood…and that shop.

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

View NBeener's profile

NBeener

4806 posts in 1831 days


#50 posted 07-17-2011 05:04 PM

My Starrett combo squares—the full-sized and the 4”, and … my Long Ranger remotes for my DC and my JDS air filter.

-- -- Neil

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