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Saws, using collecting, cleaning and buying

by Don W
posted 06-26-2011 01:17 AM


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View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1862 days


#51 posted 06-29-2011 07:27 AM

thank´s Andy for a very fine explanation …..........but
if it was cheaper to make the handle so it had that angle
then why didn´t Diston continued with it …. looking at newer Diston saws including no. 8
have the the handles like the S&J …........... and all the new saws with plastic handles have the same
more or less
so I don´t think it was becourse of the heavier blade S&J made it with that angle

but I can follow your explanation on where the power will be delivered ….. thank´s

Dennis

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

15071 posts in 2423 days


#52 posted 06-29-2011 10:13 AM

I am sure Diston made that saw to get the most bang for the buck or sawdust in every cut. I have noticed the natural motion cutting with a hand saw is a bit of an arc. I’m sure they were trying to take advantage of that. A carpenter whose dad worked back with all hand tools told me his dad said 3 cuts to cut off a 2×4. That means an efficient tool. Before nail guns, I saw a lot of carpenters sink a 16d in two hits. One to start it and one to finish the job. They hit it a lot harder than I ever would to start it ;-)) Not with my fingers in the line of fire!

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Don W's profile

Don W

15533 posts in 1314 days


#53 posted 06-29-2011 06:30 PM

Wayne, Can you explain the use of a bow saw. Same sort of question I asked on the drill brace. Why would I want one? I hope that doesn’t sound bad, it an honest question.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12302 posts in 2844 days


#54 posted 06-29-2011 06:37 PM

Think of it as a hand bandsaw for making large controlled curved cuts. Note the white template he is following in the photo below. There are also some frame saws that can be used for resawing.

http://www.toolsforworkingwood.com/Merchant/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=toolshop&Product_Code=GT-BOWSAW12&Category_Code=TS

Here is a link to a frame saw used for ripping/resawing…

http://www.hyperkitten.com/woodworking/frame_saw.php3

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View Don W's profile

Don W

15533 posts in 1314 days


#55 posted 06-29-2011 06:41 PM

Somewheres Andy posted some really good information on file sizes and such for saw sharpening. Of course i wasn’t smart enough to book mark it. Anybody know where it is?

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View Don W's profile

Don W

15533 posts in 1314 days


#56 posted 06-29-2011 06:45 PM

ahh, like a big coping saw. maybe I do need one of those.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View Dan's profile

Dan

3543 posts in 1627 days


#57 posted 06-29-2011 06:47 PM

Don, I am not sure what was posted by Andy but here is a link to a site where I get most of my saw sharpening info. It has pretty much everything you need to know. A great resource.

http://www.vintagesaws.com/cgi-bin/frameset.cgi?left=sawcare&right=/library/primer/sharp.html

-- Dan - "Collector of Hand Planes"

View Don W's profile

Don W

15533 posts in 1314 days


#58 posted 06-29-2011 07:04 PM

thanks Dan

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View dbray45's profile

dbray45

2617 posts in 1523 days


#59 posted 06-29-2011 07:22 PM

If you find an old Disston manual, it goes into this more but that link is really good.

-- David in Damascus, MD

View Brit's profile

Brit

5305 posts in 1589 days


#60 posted 06-29-2011 11:30 PM

Hi Don. The saw sharpening info I posted can be found on post #2 of the 1860's Dovetail Saw Restoration started by CharlesAuguste. The ‘Saw Filing – A Beginner’s Primer’ link comes from the Vintage Saws site that Dan refers to and was written by Pete Tarran. You can’t go wrong if you follow his instruction and advice when learning to sharpen saws.

-- Andy -- Old Chinese proverb say: If you think something can't be done, don't interrupt man who is doing it.

View Don W's profile

Don W

15533 posts in 1314 days


#61 posted 06-29-2011 11:50 PM

thanks Andy. I knew I read it and I knew I meant to save it. Maybe I did and don’t remember where I put it.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View Brit's profile

Brit

5305 posts in 1589 days


#62 posted 06-30-2011 12:47 AM

Just won this little beauty.

Vintage Tyzack & Turner tenon saw (1930s) which was a special order for a client. 18 1/2” long overal, blade 14” long, 4 1/2” deep. The teeth are all good. The blade has never been resharpened and is full depth.

-- Andy -- Old Chinese proverb say: If you think something can't be done, don't interrupt man who is doing it.

View Don W's profile

Don W

15533 posts in 1314 days


#63 posted 06-30-2011 12:49 AM

I like it.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1862 days


#64 posted 06-30-2011 01:03 AM

congrat´s Andy :-)

Dennis

View dbray45's profile

dbray45

2617 posts in 1523 days


#65 posted 06-30-2011 02:20 PM

Its a funny thing, I bought a Disston (new) serveral years ago. It sat and sat, started to rust, neglect was an understatement. The thing was factory sharpened (stamped only) and was uncomfortable to use. In my quest to learn how to sharpen, this was the saw I picked up to work on. I still reached for the old Disston that I bought more recently at a show from Tom Law. A few weeks ago, I picked up this saw and decided that the real problem was the handle and grip. It was the standard, punched out, almost molded wood handle – and really uncomfortable to use.

I took out the rasp, files, sandpaper, and BLO and started rounding and smoothing out to something similar to the old Disston. In about a half hour, this thing fits your hand, is comfortable, doesn’t wear blisters and in short, is a joy to use. When you think about it, it is really sad that a company that was a pillar in quality workmanship sank to a level that produced tools that were not worth buying more than once. This also illustrates even with the lower quality, it can be fixed.

-- David in Damascus, MD

View Brit's profile

Brit

5305 posts in 1589 days


#66 posted 06-30-2011 02:48 PM

Very true David. Did you catch this thread on reshaping handles by Paul Sellers and this one.

Please would you post a picture of your finished handle? I’d love to see it.

-- Andy -- Old Chinese proverb say: If you think something can't be done, don't interrupt man who is doing it.

View dbray45's profile

dbray45

2617 posts in 1523 days


#67 posted 06-30-2011 03:00 PM

I think those were the ones that got me thinkin. I will see what I can do about a picture. Won’t show much, most of what I did was round out the grip on all sides so the handle wasn’t squared off.

-- David in Damascus, MD

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1862 days


#68 posted 06-30-2011 03:06 PM

thank´s Andy for the links
those two blogs just surfed to fast for me to notice :-(

Dennis

View need2boat's profile

need2boat

544 posts in 1439 days


#69 posted 07-01-2011 03:58 AM

So like many on the list I’ve found some “local” good deals on a few saws and would like to give a try at sharpening. I’ve been following the thread and just wondered if anyone could talk about what to look for in a clamp. There are always a few on ebay. I’ve read that many of the older clamp that attach to the bench with a twist screw really don’t stay put well.

Also has anyone watched Tom Law video. I find for me watching is often a better way into my thick skull. ;-O

-- Second Chance Saw Works http://www.secondchancesawworks.com Blog: Positive Rake http://www.positiverake.com

View RGtools's profile

RGtools

3314 posts in 1401 days


#70 posted 07-01-2011 05:24 AM

See if you can get a book from your local library. The 7 Essientials of Woodworking (I think that’s the title and there is a plane in there) you can make a saw vise that works a heck of a lot better than what you can buy. 2 pieces of mdf a strip of, hardwood, a piano hinge and some rubber blocking. If you build yours right you will not need the clamps like I do.

If you opt for buying on, the two things you want to look for are a solid way of bolting or clamping to the bench. And make sure that the jaws grip at the ends and top. Slip a piece of paper between them and see if it slips. If it slips in the center that’s OK, hollow is better than humped when it comes to a seating surface.

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

View Brit's profile

Brit

5305 posts in 1589 days


#71 posted 07-01-2011 08:36 AM

Joe – Click the ‘1860’s Dovetail Saw Restoration’ link in post #60 in this thread. There you will see a link to Lee Valley’s site with instructions for making a saw vise.

-- Andy -- Old Chinese proverb say: If you think something can't be done, don't interrupt man who is doing it.

View Don W's profile

Don W

15533 posts in 1314 days


#72 posted 07-01-2011 02:56 PM

I came across this site.” http://www.mjdtools.com/":http://www.mjdtools.com/. It is an auction site that allows for online bidding. It currently has a whole lot of saw vises, along with a few pretty cool planes for auction. I guess you just pay shipping.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View Don W's profile

Don W

15533 posts in 1314 days


#73 posted 07-01-2011 03:44 PM

here is a got article about saw vises. http://www.wkfinetools.com/hUS-saws/z_reading/VwVices/VwVices-04.asp

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View philip marcou's profile

philip marcou

262 posts in 1344 days


#74 posted 07-02-2011 04:34 AM

Brit,
Good to see some real Spear and Jackson saws. Unfortunately they seem to have now gawn to the dawgs-they even fitted plastic handles at one stage, after re-modelling the handles – see some of Mads’s ones.

View mafe's profile

mafe

9670 posts in 1836 days


#75 posted 07-02-2011 03:42 PM

Wayne, what a beautiful spokeshave on the table of that picture. I might have tou make a Veritas.
Smile,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View Don W's profile

Don W

15533 posts in 1314 days


#76 posted 07-03-2011 02:54 AM

For those still wondering this apparently is a railroad hacksaw. I can’t find much information on it, but I did find this on ebay.

RARE MILLERS FALLS NO 24 HEAVY DUTY RAIL HACK SAW TOOL

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1862 days


#77 posted 07-03-2011 03:32 AM

thank´s for the update Don

Dennis

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

15071 posts in 2423 days


#78 posted 07-03-2011 07:21 AM

Thanks Don. I have seen those before and wondered what they were. Never thought of hack saw ;-)

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View pierce85's profile

pierce85

508 posts in 1309 days


#79 posted 07-03-2011 09:12 PM

I know this is tool gloat but… I picked up this vintage Henry Boker saw set for $21. I have no idea what it’s actually worth and I really don’t care. It’s just very cool to me and my first saw set. Thanks to this thread, I’m getting into the vintage saw scene.

View Brit's profile

Brit

5305 posts in 1589 days


#80 posted 07-04-2011 12:13 AM

Pierce85 – That is very cool. They don’t make them like that anymore. I’ve no idea how that set is used though. I can’t work it out. Its very different from the pistol grip anvil saw sets that are generally used today. Nice find though.

-- Andy -- Old Chinese proverb say: If you think something can't be done, don't interrupt man who is doing it.

View need2boat's profile

need2boat

544 posts in 1439 days


#81 posted 07-05-2011 05:18 PM

Thanks everyone for the help on the vise. I’ve found a friend in the area who has one so I’m going to give his a go. He doesn’t use it much so provided to meets the needs I’ll most likely buy it.
I did see this on on cleaning saws and thought it was a simple way to go. link

cheers

Joe

-- Second Chance Saw Works http://www.secondchancesawworks.com Blog: Positive Rake http://www.positiverake.com

View need2boat's profile

need2boat

544 posts in 1439 days


#82 posted 07-05-2011 05:20 PM

sorry the link was to the mail page give it a go

Joe

-- Second Chance Saw Works http://www.secondchancesawworks.com Blog: Positive Rake http://www.positiverake.com

View Don W's profile

Don W

15533 posts in 1314 days


#83 posted 07-10-2011 01:29 AM

this vise looks pretty cool and pretty reasonable. probably because its mis labeled.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12302 posts in 2844 days


#84 posted 07-10-2011 01:34 AM

It looks pretty good.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View Don W's profile

Don W

15533 posts in 1314 days


#85 posted 07-10-2011 01:53 AM

I’ve got 2 now, that’s enough for me. I know a few others were looking for one. I stumbled onto it looking for something totally different.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View need2boat's profile

need2boat

544 posts in 1439 days


#86 posted 07-11-2011 03:45 AM

Hey Don, its funny, I looked at that one as well.

I had posted I was looking for one and advice on what to look for. I ended up finding one that was made in syracuse NY.

I liked that it was attached to a block of wood that could be tightened into a vise since I didn’t want to clamp or bolt it to the table. It also has a good clamp that I thought if need be I could adjust to make it tighter. As it turns out it holds the blades fine.

-- Second Chance Saw Works http://www.secondchancesawworks.com Blog: Positive Rake http://www.positiverake.com

View need2boat's profile

need2boat

544 posts in 1439 days


#87 posted 07-11-2011 03:57 AM

OK, well I found some time over the weekend to dig into some of the saw I’ve collected on CL and a few from my grandfather that have needed some TLC.

I read somewhere on this list about a rust cleaner.

Well I have to say I was impressed. I really bought it to clean 2 carpenter’s squares that were so bad you couldn’t even tell they had numbers! After reading the bottle I poured about a 1/3 of the gallon into into an old large sheet pan I’ve used in the past under a car. I left them to soak and cleaned off and on first with a scotch brite pad and later with 220 paper. Happy with the results I tried 2 of my saws.

The saws really weren’t as bad so the images don’t look that impressive but it really did make short work of cleaning any rust. When I have some time hopefully later in the week I want to work on the handles a little.

I have about 4/5 more to clean up!

-- Second Chance Saw Works http://www.secondchancesawworks.com Blog: Positive Rake http://www.positiverake.com

View RGtools's profile

RGtools

3314 posts in 1401 days


#88 posted 07-11-2011 03:58 AM

I have an odd issue that I could use some help on. I went to clean up my 4 tpi Disston today (5 dollars and the thing is pretty darn clean) but I can’t get the handle off. All of the saw-nuts came out except one…that one just spins endlessly and I can’t figure out how to make it stop. The sawnut goes together like this, one side Flat-head the other side belled (no way to hold), any thoughts on holding the belled side to get the screw out?

I can always cut a notch into the belled face for a flat-head screwdriver, but that would just look wrong.

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

View need2boat's profile

need2boat

544 posts in 1439 days


#89 posted 07-11-2011 04:02 AM

Ok last post ;-)

A few of the saws I have go to a point with the nub on the end. Can someone tell me whats this is for? I have two that are slightly different but the same type of design.

-- Second Chance Saw Works http://www.secondchancesawworks.com Blog: Positive Rake http://www.positiverake.com

View Don W's profile

Don W

15533 posts in 1314 days


#90 posted 07-11-2011 12:57 PM

I just learned about these as well. Its called a Nib. Just search LJs for saw nib. Most believe its just for decoration, but there doesn’t seem to be a definitive answer. I think there is even a discussion earlier in this thread.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1862 days


#91 posted 07-11-2011 06:13 PM

RGTools
here is a tip but you have to be carefull when trying not destroying the wood

on the fare side you can use a flat screwdriver as a wedge between the head and the wood
if there is room for a very thin peice of metal then put it under the screwdriver to help preventing
the wood get damaged

maybee a little light tab on the head with a hammer when you have the other side placed on a wice
will help too to loosen the two parts …. they can be like welded together with rust like gum
so they need the little tab to crack it

these two small tips have helped me before …........maybee even a little dab of thin oil is needed
the evening before you try the other things

Take care
Dennis

View Brit's profile

Brit

5305 posts in 1589 days


#92 posted 07-11-2011 10:20 PM

RGTools – If they are brass they won’t be rusted. I would tear off a piece of gaffer tape about 1 1/2” square and tape it over the side without the screwdriver slot so it stick to the bolt head and the saw handle around it. Then press your thumb hard on the back of the bolthead and stick a screwdriver in the other side of the bolt with the slot and give it a quick twist to see if you can crack it open.

-- Andy -- Old Chinese proverb say: If you think something can't be done, don't interrupt man who is doing it.

View Brit's profile

Brit

5305 posts in 1589 days


#93 posted 07-11-2011 10:33 PM

Nice saws Joe – Please post some pictures once you’ve cleaned them up. I love to see old saws brought back to life. I just won this 14” tenon saw on eBay. I couldn’t believe it. I put in a silly bid before I left home in the UK this morning knowing that the auction would be ended by the time I arrived at my destination in Denmark 7 1/2 hours later. When I got to the hotel, I logged on to find I’d won this beauty for £16 including postage.

-- Andy -- Old Chinese proverb say: If you think something can't be done, don't interrupt man who is doing it.

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1862 days


#94 posted 07-11-2011 11:25 PM

congrat´s Andy :-)
I did saw it on the Ebay but I have to take a brake at the moment
the pipeline with the goldcoins is blocked at the moment ….. can you find out whats wrong
in the other end :-)

Dennis

View need2boat's profile

need2boat

544 posts in 1439 days


#95 posted 07-12-2011 04:41 AM

Andy I’ll for sure post some pictures.

I want to try my hand at sharping one of these before putting the handles back.

I’ve read a few of the on line links and I’ve got a local supplier that has lots and lots of files on hand from the late 70’s when he was a wholesaler.

Should I be looking for files branded for saw sharping or just match them to the size of the teeth. I’m sure he will have what’s needed just not sure what I’m looking for.

Joe

-- Second Chance Saw Works http://www.secondchancesawworks.com Blog: Positive Rake http://www.positiverake.com

View RGtools's profile

RGtools

3314 posts in 1401 days


#96 posted 07-12-2011 04:43 AM

I’ll give that a try and report Brit. Thanks.

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12302 posts in 2844 days


#97 posted 07-12-2011 06:45 AM

Pretty Saw Andy….

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View Brit's profile

Brit

5305 posts in 1589 days


#98 posted 07-12-2011 07:03 AM

Joe – Follow the link in post #60 in this thread. There you will find a lot of information on saw sharpening, including what files to use. You should use files specifically for saw sharpening because it is not just about whether or not the file fits in the teeth. It is also important to get the correct radius on the edge of the file so that the gullets of the teeth ar formed correctly.

-- Andy -- Old Chinese proverb say: If you think something can't be done, don't interrupt man who is doing it.

View joey's profile

joey

396 posts in 2651 days


#99 posted 07-12-2011 07:45 AM

Hello I’m Joe and I have a saw problem…lol I keep finding old saws cheap and buying them, just picked up a disson dovetail saw yesterday for $3 the plate was straight but the tote needed a little tlc so I cleaned up saned the and shaped it to fit my hand a little better and sharpened it and now I think it will be one of my favorite saws.

-- Joey~~Sabina, Ohio http://sleepydogwoodworking.blogspot.com/

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12302 posts in 2844 days


#100 posted 07-12-2011 07:47 AM

Great buy Joe. I need some of your luck…

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

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