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Handplanes of your dreams

by Bertha
posted 04-05-2011 08:51 PM


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mafe

9547 posts in 1746 days


#101 posted 05-18-2011 02:57 PM

RG, a combination plane would sure make life more sweet and the customors more happy.
Big smile,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

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RGtools

3302 posts in 1311 days


#102 posted 05-18-2011 02:59 PM

SHINY!!!!!!!!

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

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Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1772 days


#103 posted 05-18-2011 03:04 PM

I wuld say either a Scubplane or Jack and a jointer
ploughwork can be done by cheisels and a fine set joiner can do the work on endgrain too
if we talk few as possiple and straight work with out curves at all :-)

Dennis

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mafe

9547 posts in 1746 days


#104 posted 05-18-2011 03:15 PM

Oh – and just so there are no misunderstandings:
I like LN planes, I admire the quality, but most of all that they have given the old Stanleys new life in a supreme quality.
(I know it can get hot in here).
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

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mafe

9547 posts in 1746 days


#105 posted 05-18-2011 03:19 PM

Our friend Sodabowski just build a sofatable with a 2 dollar blockplane.
It brings some thoughts.

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

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Bertha

12951 posts in 1350 days


#106 posted 05-18-2011 03:39 PM

I’m with you, Mads, I admire LN as well, particularly the bronzes and the difficult to find Stanley remakes. They are a perfect choice for certain people but I prefer the older Stanleys. Now PM planes are in a whole different league, being instant heirlooms with great charm, extremely high tolerances, timeless design, and extreme beauty. And these are NEW planes I’m going on about! :)

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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WayneC

12290 posts in 2754 days


#107 posted 05-18-2011 04:35 PM

I think a major variability in the number of planes you use is driven by how much you are using machines. E.g. if your not using a jointer / planer then you need a Scrub or a jack plane tuned for course cutting and a Jointer plane to straighten the wood.

I see minimum (in stanley sizes) A number 4, 4 1/2, or 5 1/2 smoother #5, and a #7 or #8, good shoulder plane and a very good low angle block plane (#65 for the win). Choices are dependent on how big a plane you like to push (5 1/2, and #8 are the manly choices… lol)

If I was limited to 3 essental planes, I would choose any 3 made by Phillip. I can find all of the non-essental planes I want at the local flea market. : ^ )

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

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mafe

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#108 posted 05-18-2011 05:16 PM

How wonderful is it, we seem all to listen and agree here on this thread.
We have understanding and respect.
Life is sweet when we remember the sugar.
Big smile and thank you guys,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

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Div

1653 posts in 1597 days


#109 posted 05-18-2011 10:04 PM

Sigh! I’ve just been drooling through this post after some time away….Sigh…Such beautiful tools…Sigh…Sadly not in the realm of someone who works the wood for a living, like me. But, I have some nice “normal” planes! And I have had Toolchap’s beauties in my grubby paws! And I’ve had the honor to wrap my hands around a #1, and a Norris, and a number of other rare vintage planes (thanks Toolchap!)And I really enjoy making my wooden baby planes! Here is a plane no money can buy:

-- Div @ the bottom end of Africa. "A woodworker's sharpest tool should be his mind."

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mafe

9547 posts in 1746 days


#110 posted 05-18-2011 10:13 PM

Yes Div, that sure is a beauty, and I am so proud and happy to be able to say I acually use some of your wonderful planes when I play arround in my workshop.
You acually managed to inspire me, so I work on a small shoulder plane now!
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

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Div

1653 posts in 1597 days


#111 posted 05-18-2011 10:18 PM

That is great news my friend! It makes me real happy to hear that!! Enjoy my brother!

-- Div @ the bottom end of Africa. "A woodworker's sharpest tool should be his mind."

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RGtools

3302 posts in 1311 days


#112 posted 05-19-2011 05:58 AM

Mafe Please walk through the build of that shoulder plane. It’s something I am contemplating as well since I have a shoulder that is broken but I want to use the iron.

Div, your shoulder plane is awesome.

I like the differences in opinion here and really appreciate the points of view here. I really wish David would comment so we can see if anything we wrote spoke to him.

P.S. I just smoked the most wonderful cigar (I smoke once or twice a year so I can afford to spend a bit) and I thought of you.

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

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philip marcou

262 posts in 1254 days


#113 posted 05-19-2011 08:09 AM

Well I just wanted to confirm that Mafe had made a typo error-I suspected he may have omitted a word such as “dozen” or “score” but now that he says he has about 80 planes it’s possible that he has too many to count (;).
i think the answer to the question is influenced by the type of woodworking one does closely followed by whether or not one does it commercially. Then we have collectors (aka magpies) and there is often no logical answer to the question.
Another way to e address the question is to determine which planes one could do WITHOUT and right away I would say from my point of view I never use my #4 as I find the #4 1/2 far superior . Similarly I have no use for #5 as I use a #5 1/2 for most things including smoothing, in fact it is my number one choice. I have spent my career using a Bedrock #7 as I never managed to get a #8 until I came to NZ when I got one to pimp up but have kept it- I would think now I would prefer the #8 over the #7 if I had to make a choice.
Horror of horrors: I can live without any Stanley or Record block plane as I prefer one with a tote so I have substituted my #3 for all block planes -EXCEPT- I would have a skew type such as the Lie Nielsen.
I have done many car woodwork jobs and some bar tops , architectural type jobs in which I would have been hard pressed had I not had my trusty # 20 compass plane.
My simple Record #040 plough plane fitted with a 1/4” cutter is indispensable for tweaking grooves for panels and drawer bottoms made by routers. The Record #405 multi plane sits quietly in it’s box along with 23 standard cutters, defeated by routers.
My Stanley #92 and 93 along with Record #073 shoulder and various bull nose items also sit quietly….
I almost forgot my Stanley #71 Router plane -try making a bookcase without one of these, no matter how many electric routers you may have.
And the Stanley #81 scraper…..
I have a number of shoulder planes but the one most favoured is my Record #712 skew which is good for rabbets and shoulders. I would add one of my own mini rabbet planes to that but maybe it is just because I like the look of the thing.
Three, THREE, planes??

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mafe

9547 posts in 1746 days


#114 posted 05-19-2011 11:13 AM

RG, that sounds just wonderful, I have smoked one or two cigars that tasted wonderful in my life, so I can follow you easy. The sweetness the spices hmmmmmmm, wonderful. It was relly kind of you to send me a thought in that moment, thank you.

Phillip you just gave me a big wonderful laugh thank you (I like your words).
I can see we have got our selfs another collector here on LJ.
Judging from your choices you are a strong man with a big hand (4,5 – 5,5 – 8).
Yes I am a collector and bought my planes purely from pleasure and then found out how to use, sharpen and set them up. I am architect from profession but do only little since I had to retire due to health (I had a bad operation).
When I was young my dream was to be a cabinetmaker, but in my family the work of the hand was not allowed, I had to become a academic… I wish today I had become a cabinetmaker, and then a architect this would have been just me. Now I retired and try my way, to learn and to do it by error, and I enjoy every moment. You can look in my projects if you are interested, I have the things I have made the last two years postet here also a lot of blogs to share my ‘journy in wood’ with others.
I have worked a lot with wood workers from Poland, Estonia and this end of the world and these guys laugh at us, they usually have a four and a blockplane and do miracles, my favorite worker usually made him self temporary chisel planes from a cisel, a piece of wood and a wedge then he would clean up any groove or rabbet. When he saw my plane collection he laughed and laughed, and said ‘das loile architecte’ meaning the crazy architect (this is the nick name he gave me 15 years ago du to my high demands for standard when he worked for me).
Yes I think also I wrote as you, that it is all depending on the man and what he do at the end. But if someone is a starter I would still say the same three planes I said, if you are more serious and strong yes change the four with a five and a half.
The best of my thoughts,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

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WayneC

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#115 posted 05-19-2011 04:27 PM

Darn it, I am going to have to stop reading this thread. Phillip has added another non-essental plane to the list. I guess I am going to have to count my planes. Not sure how many planes I have. I hope it is less than Mads. If not, I might have to declare myself an addict.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

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Div

1653 posts in 1597 days


#116 posted 05-19-2011 10:39 PM

If I have to pick only 3 planes I first need to now if you guys classify spokeshaves as planes also. I use them A LOT. If so, give me a convex spokeshave, a blockplane and a #7. Jeezzz, tough to choose, what about my #81 scraper plane? Anyway, what I’ll do then is just make wooden shoulder planes, jacks, smoothers, whatever I want! He,he,he!

Mads, RG Tools, I have some photos here taken during the build of a simple wooden shoulder plane. I can do a blog if you want….

-- Div @ the bottom end of Africa. "A woodworker's sharpest tool should be his mind."

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WayneC

12290 posts in 2754 days


#117 posted 05-19-2011 10:49 PM

I don’t know about Mads or RG Tools Div, but I would be interested if you were to blog on the construction of your shoulder plane.

Also, Hock Tools has a shoulder plane kit now. The assembly video might give you all some ideas. The link to the video is

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AVBdPadFOtw&feature=player_embedded

The link to the actual kit is

http://www.hocktools.com/Kits.htm#KS

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

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mafe

9547 posts in 1746 days


#118 posted 05-19-2011 11:10 PM

Hi Div,
I think that it will be wonderful with a blog on this.
I will love to get a little into you brain my dear brother.
To see how you work, that will be a pleasure.


I am now that fare that I have cut up the wooden parts and made a drawing of the final design, angle and found a blockplane iron I will cut up into several small plane irons.

For your choices of planes I think it was clever, and you, and I think this mind game is getting more and more fun.

Best thoughts,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

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philip marcou

262 posts in 1254 days


#119 posted 05-20-2011 07:30 AM

Div, is the blade on your shoulder plane skewed?

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philip marcou

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#120 posted 05-20-2011 10:56 AM

Mafe said “Judging from your choices you are a strong man with a big hand (4,5 – 5,5 – 8).”

I take it he is implying that one has to be strong to use bigger planes. In fact this is not true and I think the bigger sizes are easier to use effectively. I am pretty sure the main reason for this is the weight. Provided the sole is suitably lubricated (with white candle wax for example) it is down to momentum and one can easily use a #8 one handed assuming the cut is not too coarse.
Fans of wooden planes always tout the light weight of these planes as a major advantage and you hear statements such as ” You’re never gonna be able to use that plane all day long it ’s so heavy”. Well these days one simply doesn’t have to plane all day long unless suffering from delusions of some sort, and the weight allows one to concentrate on removing shavings in the right places/accurately rather than having to also hold the plane down. That is why I said a #4 1/2 is “far superior” to a #4, ditto for the #5 vs the #5 1/2. Try using a #4 one handed before you do the same with a #5 1/2.
Unless ofcourse it is one of these which is a bit shorter than a #4 Stanley but a lot heavier….

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philip marcou

262 posts in 1254 days


#121 posted 05-20-2011 11:02 AM

Div, I certainly think that spoke shaves can be classified as planes, and they are essential for making period type chairs and the like. I mean, you don’t want to be RASPING, filing and sanding all day long, for sure.
Have you seen Mafe’s gallery to check out his spokeshaves?

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mafe

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#122 posted 05-20-2011 11:28 AM

Phillip, it is interesting and gives fire to a idea I have been working on, thank you.
Why do you make some of your planes with aluminium caps I understood it was a matter of weight?
There must be a limit on this weight when it stops to be fun.
I imagine it has also a lot to do with the tecnique used, I think of the Japanese also, and ofcourse what you say makes good sence as long as the plane is flat on the bench and you dont have to lift it back to position, or do work where you hold it in stretched arm. Still it takes more energy to use a wider blade since you have to push it through the wood. (And for me personally I had a bad operation in my neck so I can not do much planing before giving up, it is the sad reality). I would love one dat to try and plane with a real heavy plane.
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

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philip marcou

262 posts in 1254 days


#123 posted 05-20-2011 11:47 AM

“Why do you make some of your planes with aluminium caps I understood it was a matter of weight?”
Mafe, I have not fitted aluminium caps to any plane of mine , except for an S45 (similar to the one above), but was experimenting , didn’t like it and went back to using bronze.
I don’t know what the weight limit you mention could be : my heaviest plane is close to 10 lbs and I don’t find it tiring. You are right though, conditions need to be conducive eg the work bench height etc.
Lifting on the return stroke: sometimes I do sometimes i don’t (;) but with the heavy planes I just raise the rear slightly on the pull back so the toe is still on the wood but the blade is not rubbing ie not actually lifting the total weight…..
Wider blade requires more pushing force (as does higher angle) therefore one wants a HEAVY plane qed….
I hope you use white wax or candle wax or something similar to aid your planing and prevent extra neck problems.
P.S: I am thoroughly enjoying reading through your 136 projects . I saw on another forum a whole lot of posts which came up when someone asked where he could get handles for needle files-not one person suggested that they can be better made by the owner of the files- and yes, it is a woodworking forum lol…..

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mafe

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#124 posted 05-20-2011 12:27 PM

Hi Phillip,
Smile, then I was just unlucky to see that one plane when I visited your site – lol.
I use wax to lubricate the planes soles, this is why I got into the greasebox adventure.
I will love one day to get a chance to try one of your planes, to feel this weight in action but we do not live too close, but we never know, one day perhaps.
If you looked in my posts you will see I’m a really curious person, so I try to take a travel in all these tools, trying to understand and to build them as much as I can, this is where from my intrest comes.
Yes it is ironic that some one on a woodworking forum is asking where to buy handles. But can you tell me where I can buy a hand plane? lol.
Have a nice day,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

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mafe

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#125 posted 05-20-2011 12:33 PM

Now I know where I know your name from! It’s from the TalkFestool site!
Big smile.

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

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RGtools

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#126 posted 05-20-2011 03:17 PM

I agree on the weight thing with Philip. I am always trying to ADD weight to my wooden planes. The reason I like them, is there simple build allows for the plane to fit my work rather than trying to fit my work to a plane. The soles also retain a wax “load” a bit longer. I use both metal and wooden planes and at some point I would like to have an ultra heavy smoother with a 2” wide blade a high angle (55) and of course a very tight mouth for very figured woods.

But in the mean time having my bench low lets me work well.

I also agree that lifting a plane completely on the backstroke is a fast way to become exhausted. I just lift the back end (if at all) .

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

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Bertha

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#127 posted 05-20-2011 04:23 PM

Hey friends, I quit in a huff of anger; then unquit mainly because I was lurking this thread (which would have been removed). This type of talk is simply too important to my soul for me to allow it to perish.

As I’ve always said, I like the bigger planes and I’m a pretty slight guy. Like PM, I’m a fan of the 1/2 sizes. I probably gravitate toward the corrugated soles for some of the reasons listed above (and always have paraffin nearby). My favorite plane is the No.8 (because i don’t own any giant English/Scottish infills). Lightweight wooden planes tend to skip around under my inadequate pressure (and with added pressure comes fatigue). To make matters worse, I’ve had multiple shoulder surgeries, so I need to be careful (just like you, Mads).

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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WayneC

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#128 posted 05-20-2011 04:59 PM

My first born for Stanley 4 1/2H and 5 1/2H heavy planes… ( a big investment because she is just about to finish college)

Bertha, glad to see your back. Hmmmm. Had not tried my #8 tuned for smoothing. : ^ )

Phillip, re: file handles. I think that a lot of fundamental knowledge and skill is being lost. The generation that had this knowledge is leaving this world and not passing the knowledge along. In the US, industrial arts programs are victims of ever increasing budget cuts (along with art, drama, and music). I am real happy to see folks like Christopher Schwarz champion this kind of knowlege and make it more readily available. I am also a big fan of old woodworking books (and other books) being digitized and made available via the internet. Perhaps we can recapture these skills and knowledge more widely.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

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Bertha

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#129 posted 05-20-2011 05:07 PM

Wayne, perhaps a quick link to your e-book collection thread is in order here? Mine’s favorited but this may be a good place for the reference.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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WayneC

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#130 posted 05-20-2011 05:27 PM

Thanks Al, I actually have a Handplane Reference blog that has all kinds of stuff videos, web links, books, etc…

I added the ebooks post a little while back.

http://lumberjocks.com/WayneC/blog/series/43

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

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Bertha

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#131 posted 05-20-2011 05:34 PM

I mentioned that I brought my Mom a Nook for Mom’s day & we used your links to test it out. She’s coming to visit later this month, so I’ll get a chance to do some pleasurable reading for a chance. :)

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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WayneC

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#132 posted 05-20-2011 05:54 PM

I’m getting to where I am starting to prefer e-readers over printed books for novels and such. I noticed that Garrett Hack’s handplane book and a number of woodworking books are starting to show up on Amazon.com for the Kindle. I’ll have to check what is available on the Nook.

http://www.amazon.com/The-Handplane-Book-ebook/dp/B003TXSRC8/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&m=AG56TWVU5XWC2&s=digital-text&qid=1305906527&sr=8-2

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

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Bertha

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#133 posted 05-20-2011 06:10 PM

I think that’s probably where we’re going, for a lot of reasons. If they print less books, they’ll cut less trees, and there will be more trees for us to cut, to make lumber from:)

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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Div

1653 posts in 1597 days


#134 posted 05-20-2011 09:33 PM

Philip Marcou, no not on that shoulder plane. I’ve been toying with the idea of a skewed wooden shoulder plane for some time…now it is finished….in my head, that is! Maybe this winter I’ll find time to turn it into a reality.

I also agree on the weight thing. I think it is on of the biggest benefits of metal planes. Everyone speaks of the ease of adjustment, but weight is the thing. Once you get the hang of wedged planes they are actually easy to adjust.

Mads and WayneC, I’ll post a blog on shoulder planes over the weekend.

-- Div @ the bottom end of Africa. "A woodworker's sharpest tool should be his mind."

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RGtools

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#135 posted 05-21-2011 04:05 AM

I love my 2ox hammer adjustment. I thought it was Klunky until I realized what I could do. Now I find myself hammer adjusting my planes that have lateral adjusters.

Bertha, thats the best argument I have heard yet to get me into the nook. (but I still like the small of the books I love) That’s the other reason I love planes. You get to small the wood rather than choke on it.

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

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derosa

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#136 posted 05-21-2011 06:33 AM

Looking at some of these, why the use of brass vs bronze which would seem to be heavier and denser like the iron planes but still lack the rusting issue? Just a thought as I spent some time studying bronze casting for archaeology and would like to make an infill plane.

-- --Rev. Russ in NY-- A posse ad esse

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Chelios

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#137 posted 05-21-2011 07:08 AM

Earlier in this post I had mentioned that a 5 1/2 in a bronze body would be my dream plane. I actually asked Lie Nielsen if they would make me a 5 1/2 in bronze. Long shot I know but I had to try. Their response was

“Casting bronze in larger shapes is difficult because of the way it shrinks as it cools. Making a bronze 5-1/2 would require a new matchplate in order to try and produce a raw casting. The failure rate of castings that large would be high. For that sized tool, a bronze casting doesn’t make sense from a weight aspect. “

I agree with Philip M that the 5 1/2 is a great size and I would love the extra weight of the bronze but apparently that is not a feasible request from a manufacturing POV. Maybe if more people were interested they would consider a bit more making a special run. Wouldn’t that be great??

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philip marcou

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#138 posted 05-21-2011 08:40 AM

Chelios,
L/N also said “For that sized tool, a bronze casting doesn’t make sense from a weight aspect”.
I think they are saying the plane would be too heavy and I do wonder just how much heavier it would be compared to the cast iron version.
When it comes to mass production fings are different, you know what I mean?

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philip marcou

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#139 posted 05-21-2011 08:47 AM

re post #121: I said “Try using a #4 one handed before you do the same with a #5 1/2”.
I meant to say “try using a #4 one handed before you do the same with a #4 1/2”.
it hi-lights the difference between the two.

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mafe

9547 posts in 1746 days


#140 posted 05-21-2011 11:42 AM

There is only one thing I don’t get here, why dont they just make the casting thicker on the iron planes if this weight is making it better? That should be really easy. Just to add weight in the casting. Hmmm, but since I live on a retired budget so I cant efford one of your planes Phillip, I will see if I can get 4,5 or 5,5 and test there, and then add weight on the equal numer and see if it is not also a matter of size… You guys make me curious now – thank you. I love to be that.
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

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philip marcou

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#141 posted 05-21-2011 12:16 PM

Mafe, those are mass produced planes you refer to: accountants make them and they get worried about costs of production i.e extra cast iron costs more and can this be passed on to the customers (you) (;) (;).
But wait, maybe some enterprising toolmaker will come up with a tote made of lead for that #5 or a solid bronze hot dog handle for your #9…...

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Chelios

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#142 posted 05-21-2011 05:14 PM

Maybe start a new company to design and make Dream Handplanes. I am sure there are the brains here to pull it off. Now we just need some money!

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WayneC

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#143 posted 05-21-2011 05:45 PM

Call it Lie-Valley? lol.

This thread is making my cabin fever stronger. I want to get out, find a cool plane, restore it and play with it. That or build something.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

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SCOTSMAN

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#144 posted 05-21-2011 06:07 PM

Well done bertha you have my salivary glands going.LOL Alistair

-- excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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Bertha

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#145 posted 05-21-2011 06:16 PM

PM, (I hope you don’t mind us abbreviating your name; I’m always worried I’ll switch and “o”, “u”, or drop and “l” and insult you:)), Along those lines, it would be interesting to pack a home-made front and rear tote with lead. When I turn front knobs, I always make them larger. I like the larger palm swell. Take for instance PM’s S15A (all rights to PM and I hope you don’t mind me reproducing the image here):

Note how robust the front knob is (if you can ignore the rest of the plane for a second!). Here’s a red-heart rehandled 71 1/2 I did with much more robust knobs. The difference in control was very noticeable to me.

One of my tools (novice) next to PM’s (master); I’ve got to admit I like seeing them together!

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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Jahness

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#146 posted 05-21-2011 06:40 PM

The way I drop them, I’ll have to say Buck Bros. I do have a few old Stanleys that I started to collect several years ago but hand tools are very hard for me, unfortunatly.

-- John

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mafe

9547 posts in 1746 days


#147 posted 05-23-2011 03:46 PM

Thats a beautiful 71 1/2.
I just bought vintage 4,5 and a 5,5 then I will see when they arrive and I have tuned them up, if I find them to heavy or not, I could not have that in the back of my head… Since I have too much pain, so if it’s wrong I know where to send the bill Philip – lol.
Now I just need to build another plane cabinet since I never expected to go into the half numbers… – big problem MaFe!!! http://lumberjocks.com/projects/29996
Big smile,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1350 days


#148 posted 05-23-2011 04:17 PM

Awwww, poor Mafe, too many planes for his cabinet:) Knowing you, you’ll have an 8 foot tall dehumidified cabinet built by the end of the day:) As long as your body behaves, you will like these planes.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View Brit's profile

Brit

5153 posts in 1500 days


#149 posted 05-23-2011 05:31 PM

That’s hilarious Al. Thanks for the laugh. You’ll get no sympathy from me either Mads. In fact from now on you shall be known as Greedy Mads.

-- Andy -- Old Chinese proverb say: If you think something can't be done, don't interrupt man who is doing it.

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1350 days


#150 posted 05-23-2011 05:32 PM

It took me about a year each to find a 4 1/2 and 5 1/2. Mads scored both in one setting. He must have some yet undiscovered vintage tool vein :)

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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