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View Bertha's profile

Can we talk chisels?

by Bertha
posted 1238 days ago


1 2 3 4 ... 38 next »
1873 replies

1873 replies so far

View swirt's profile

swirt

1935 posts in 1568 days


#1 posted 1238 days ago

I’m much more fond of socket chisels than tang. For some reason, drilling a straight hole in a handle escapes my grasp. LOL

I have grown kind of partial to chisels made by D R Barton. They were made in my home town from 1832 to the early 1900’s. They aren’t too difficult to find for a tool that age. I have a couple of old Witherbys and they are nice, but my long term goal is to end up with a complete set of D R Bartons. Mainly just for the challenge of it.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1289 days


#2 posted 1238 days ago

Now see, that’s exactly what I’m talking about, Swirt! That’s as good a reason as I’ve ever heard for chasing a brand. Chisels seem to have that extra “something” that makes me want to collect them. If any were made in my home town, I’d be all over them. I’m pretty sure I have a few Bartons in my collection. I’m definitely going to look tonight.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View swirt's profile

swirt

1935 posts in 1568 days


#3 posted 1238 days ago

I have been happy with the Barton quality. I started with a Barton drawknife, then some chisels, then a couple wooden planes, then a side-axe… The brand alone won’t cause me to pick one up, but it does help tip me off the fence if I am having trouble deciding. ;)

Some dating info here in case you are interested http://www.davistownmuseum.org/bioBarton.html

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

View cabmaker's profile

cabmaker

1282 posts in 1405 days


#4 posted 1237 days ago

I use vintage stanley #40 s. Because I have a full set of them. I use them for any occasion a chisel is needed. They do hold an edge very well, and they are very rugged. I have grabbed up a few spares over the years but they are difficult to come by.

View David Kirtley's profile

David Kirtley

1276 posts in 1594 days


#5 posted 1237 days ago

swirt:

Neener neener neener. Thos Witherby from 1/8 to 2” in an original box :) – by eighths. But they are varying condition and all need to be rehandled. What is commonly referred to as a harlequin set.

I really have an embarrassment of chisels. I just like them. What can I say? In a previous life, I used to scour flea markets and garage sales and sell off extras to fund my “affliction.”

I prefer to use registered chisels most times. I have one old Isaac Greaves that is my real go to chisel. 1-1/4 socket firmer. It just “feels right” for most stuff. Looks like this one but a lot better condition (but this one in pic would probably clean up pretty)

http://theoldtoolshed.co.uk/products/175-early-isaac-greaves-chisel.aspx :

A bunch of really frightening socket chisels and gouges (up to 19” blade to end of socket kind of scarey.) Going up in range to 3 1/2 in or so.
Just not too long ago picked up a set of Japanese style chisels from Grizzly. I actually like them a lot.
Sets of mortise chisels and gouges. (Modern vintage)
A set of firmers from Crown I believe (old Woodworkers Supply house brand)
Corner chisels (bruzz) in a couple sizes.

A pile of orphan chisels that I have not had time to get into use on the bottom shelf of my small workbench. They make great stocking stuffers.

-- Woodworking shouldn't cost a fortune: http://lowbudgetwoodworker.blogspot.com/

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1289 days


#6 posted 1237 days ago

Cabmaker, I really like the #40’s as well. I like that deep, prismatic taper on the bevel side. They’re definitely a beefy chisel. I don’t own any myself to my knowledge, but you’ve got me thinking….

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

3342 posts in 2557 days


#7 posted 1237 days ago

Well, glad to know that someone else has some W. Butcher stuff. I’ve collected several Butcher items (including a tennon saw), and find them to be excellect. Cast steel, and they really hold up well.
On subject…I have both socket and tang chisels.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View Roper's profile

Roper

1346 posts in 2309 days


#8 posted 1237 days ago

I like the socketed chisels because it is much easier to replace a handle, I have almost a full set of James Swans that I would not trade for anything,they hold a great edge and have done well on every type of wood I have thrown at them. They are probably 80 to 100 yours old. I also have an old set of Pexto’s for my timber framing chisels. I like old hand tools.I also have a Swan draw knife same time frame.

-- Roper - Master of sawdust- www.roperwoodturning.com

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1289 days


#9 posted 1237 days ago

So, to tally (this is very exciting to me), I’ve learned about D.R. Barton and have a new reason to collect them (my man, Swift); Cab’s got me re-interested in the Stanley #40’s; I’ve found a fellow T.H.W. guy in D. Kirtley (who’s got a set that might possibly threaten his life in real life; but this is the internet, thankfully); Bill’s backing me up on the Butcher’s & that’s the first I’m hearing of a saw! Roper’s in on the Swans (own a few) & gives a nod to the Pexto big boys.

This is glorious.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1289 days


#10 posted 1237 days ago

Link to gentleman Kirtley’s Graves above & zoom on the detail. If that doesn’t give you the chisel-willies, nothing will. Spectacular!

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View TechRedneck's profile

TechRedneck

735 posts in 1453 days


#11 posted 1237 days ago

I am looking for a good set myself. I don’t have the time to go to auctions or yard sales but could use a good set of new ones. Any suggestions? I noticed that Woodcraft and Woodpeckers have some sales this weekend.

-- Mike.... West Virginia. "Man is a tool using animal. Without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all.". T Carlyle

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1289 days


#12 posted 1237 days ago

Hey Tech, the big box stores usually have sets of Irwin/Marples plastic-handles for around $20-30/set or so. I cut the handles off flat to a reasonable length for chopping & replace them when I ruin them. I’ve bought two-cherries-brand sets, which aI found rather nice for the bucks. Of course, you can hit up Japan Woodworker for some beautiful sets if you’re willing to spend a bit more. I tend to have three types of chisels: 1) those that I beat to death (cheap; as above), 2) those high-end ones for specific tasks (mortising, etc.), and 3) those that I just admire. Good luck, my friend!

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View TechRedneck's profile

TechRedneck

735 posts in 1453 days


#13 posted 1237 days ago

Bertha,, I’ve heard others on LJ’s talk about the Irwin’s and stopped at Lowes to take a look at them, they did not have any and the sales clerk stated they were not stocking them anymore. I think Home Depot may have them. For that price I’ll give them a try. I have a mortiser but always need to fine tune the joints. I am slowly coming to the realization that I may need a couple sets as you suggest. I would rather sharpen all the tools at once and grab them when needed, this goes for chisels and planes. MORE STUFF!!

-- Mike.... West Virginia. "Man is a tool using animal. Without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all.". T Carlyle

View swirt's profile

swirt

1935 posts in 1568 days


#14 posted 1237 days ago

Acquiring old Chisels to me is almost like a game of cards. You keep drawing and discarding until you have a hand you really like. Its kind of fun that way.

Of course David just took the pot with a complete set or Witherbys ;)

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

View Chris Pond's profile

Chris Pond

63 posts in 1643 days


#15 posted 1237 days ago

As of most of my wood working tool my Chisels are old. I prefer socket because you can’t “hurt” the Chisel handle but the “tang” my fear would be to split the handle. Here are some of my Chisel they are larger, but my thought was I still could by a refine set later. Like Blue Sprue one nice set :)

Pictures are in my Profile thx.

Chris

-- Chris, Summerland BC

View Moron's profile

Moron

4666 posts in 2490 days


#16 posted 1237 days ago

My favorite chisel is sharp.

Second to that are my Lee Neilson

third my Marples

unlike an electric or air powered tool, chisels work great if they are sharp, if they are dull, no matter what you paid, they are are useless.

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

View mafe's profile

mafe

9435 posts in 1686 days


#17 posted 1237 days ago

For me this is a difficult talk!
It is so difficult to advice on this, since it’s so much feeling at the end.
I love vintage, and would at any day give away a new set of factory made chisels at any brand, for an old beautiful vintage quality set. But I do understand that some love to buy new, it’s like with cars, some love a brand new, and some love a vintage car. When it comes to performance it’s a matter of use first of all. A2 steel will hold a edge for a long time on a high angel grind so excellent for fieldwork and building, A1 steel will be preferable for a cabinetmakers chisels, and so. Some people like the look of a set of blue handle Irwin, some like a old worn vintage full of life, some like a new ‘old school’ wood handle that shines, some really don’t give a s… for nothing but performance. At the end it’s personal, and so it should not be a matter for discussion, but I see again and again people claiming that the plastic handle Irwin are no good, and this is wrong! I see again and again people claim that LN is the best, and this is wrong. I see again and again people saying that you can’t find old chisels in a good quality and this is wrong. And so on.
So when people ask what chisels they should buy they have to bring some info; price range, use and taste.
Me was one of those idiots who did not ask and just fly out to buy what I read was the best, so I bought a set of Bahco 434 and these are really wonderful chisels, but just not what I was looking for! So next step was to slowly build knowledge and try to find answers.
My personal answer for now:
A set of old English firmer chisels with their old original handles in box wood, these cut so wonderful and reminds me in use of the Japanese, they are excellent for paring. I guess due to the steel that are hard but not brittle. And they make me smile and think of ‘the old days’.
A set of rebuild and rehandled old English chisels, that I changed into a dovetail set, fishtail, skewed and paring with short rounded handles for grip and control with the hand. These again are hard but able to have a low angel grind and be razor sharp.
A set of old French mortise chisels made from their old military sword maker, I have just rehandled them in old style, and they are nothing less than wonderful.
A set of Bacho 434, these are a set of wonderful chisels in excellent quality, but not for the workshop, they are for construction work, so they are rounded, much too hard steel for my taste, and made for site purpose, where they will hold a edge long (I prefer a sharp edge easy set, than a slowly more dull).
My sister are in Korea and are looking for a set of Japanese or Korean for me, I don’t really have a relation to these, but since so many cabinetmakers love them, I will like to try and figure out why, and also I like the design.
So the ultimate set…
For me the; Ashley Iles Mk 2 Bevel Edged Cabinetmakers Chisels are the closest to perfection you can buy new today. They are handmade from the old Sheffield traditions and with A1 steel, so I plan on buying a set of six as soon as my budget allows. To me they hold more than quality, they are extremely flat, made of the best of steel, classic English handles, handmade by some of the best makers in the world. For me they have this touch of the hand that makes me smile, this I can’t find in the Kirchen or LN versions, they look and feel machine made to me. But yes if someone has a full set of old 750 for the same price I’m in.
And if I win the lottery I will buy the big Iles set. (I just wrote them yesterday to hear if I could buy one alone first to test the quality and feel before buying the set).
(When you buy old chisels you will some knowledge and patience, you need to wait for the right price, the right type and at times you will have a bad boy in the class; either too hard and brittle or too soft with no hardening, but so what if you get them at a fair price and you know how to judge them. But if you are a beginner and don’t want to spend time, buy a fair set of factory made like Kirchen, Bahco or Irwin, but choose the models that suits your needs not just the brand).
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View mafe's profile

mafe

9435 posts in 1686 days


#18 posted 1237 days ago

Ohhh yes I also have a set of vintage gauges from English and French produceres.
- and ofcourse some old Bahco Sandvic (these are wonderful chisels, with a fine edge and we have used these in Denmark for generations, the only dislike for me is a high side before the bevel).
LOL.
I think for me sharp is also the most important word.
So buy a good sharpening system, and sharpen 100 times with it, then you discover the secret of the chisel.

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View David Craig's profile

David Craig

2130 posts in 1705 days


#19 posted 1237 days ago

I, unfortunately, get very little exposure to vintage woodworking tools. I can sometimes get a good deal on ebay for a hand plane, but the bids get carried away on the old chisels. The only vintage item that I have in this category is an old Pexto socket firmer chisel that was in a box of rusted tools that a friend found and gave me. I cleaned it up and it does hold a nice edge.

On the new front, I am pretty fond of the Narex chisels I have. Once flattened and sharpened, they keep their edge for a fair amount of use. I bought 4 bench chisels and two mortising chisels for around 80 bucks, delivered. I have no complaints in regards to their performance.

David

-- There is little that is simple when it comes to making a simple box.

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1289 days


#20 posted 1237 days ago

Mads, thank you for this thoughtful comment, as I realize that it’s a very personal topic for you. I appreciate the lore of chiselmaking, a sentiment you clearly share, as you own chisels produced by a swordsmith. I would agree that the Iles set is wonderful and VERY reasonably priced. A modest set of 6 for $150 or the monster 11-piece set for a bit over $300. That’s a bargain, but of course, it’s still money. For those that haven’t seen them,

http://www.toolsforworkingwood.com/Merchant/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=toolshop&Product_Code=IL-100-40.XX&Category_Code=CIL

I would rehandle the MK2’s but that’s clearly a very personal preference. Handle shape is another topic entirely!

Another fine pigsticker is also found at the same seller:

http://www.toolsforworkingwood.com/Merchant/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=toolshop&Product_Code=MS-MORT.XX&Category_Code=TBMC&Search=mortise chisel

For those with the disease and unlimited budget, the Tasai’s are a thing of beauty:

http://www.japanwoodworker.com/product.asp?s=JapanWoodworker&pf_id=05.303.50&dept_id=12766

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1289 days


#21 posted 1237 days ago

David, I own a few massive Pexto sockets and I’m quite fond of them. You’re right about the Ebay bidding on older chisels, particularly Witherbys & particularly mortise chisels. I’ve resorted to buying large sets & selecting out the few I’m after. Like Swirt says, I’ll pick my card & return the rest to the deck. I’ve gone overboard on Ebay for a missing component of my collection. All part of the game, I suppose.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View swirt's profile

swirt

1935 posts in 1568 days


#22 posted 1237 days ago

I agree with Bertha about buying chisels on ebay. Usually the single chisels, especially in good shape go for a less than ideal price especially when you figure in shipping. I get better deals by looking at assorted sets, especially with those with missing or damaged handles. Thanks to the flat rate boxes here in the states, shipping a bunch of old chisels usually costs the same as shipping one. The discouraging part is that those selling a set of “junk” chisels rarely take the time to get good photos or document maker names or even sizes. Unfortunately those lacking all that info are the best deals because they go cheap, but they also carry the most risk of ending up with nothing but junk.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

View mafe's profile

mafe

9435 posts in 1686 days


#23 posted 1237 days ago


Al, look what I just made out of those old French mortice chisels.
I smile!
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1289 days


#24 posted 1237 days ago

^absolutely agree with Swirt. I can pay $40 for a Witherby in decent shape & spend another $10 shipping it. I’m usually going to replace the socket anyway. I can buy a whole box of assorted chisels for $20, many without handles, & pay $10 to ship the whole package. They’re usually at least 80% losers but there’s that rare gem in there somewhere. If you’re not brand collecting, there’s ALWAYS one in there that can be reshaped & rehandled (Just look at Mads’ chisel alterations). I got a little dud mortise chisel with about an inch of blade left. I put a big, fat, mushroomed-shaped handle on it & it’s now one of my favorite chisels. Your more likely to fashion a “special” chisel for a particular use in your shop if you paid $1 instead of $50 for it. I’ve now got a drawer full of “losers’ that I can play with at zero risk.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View Brit's profile

Brit

5107 posts in 1439 days


#25 posted 1234 days ago

I bought a set of Irwin blue chip chisels as my first set or at least the first set of chisels that I’ve tried to do decent woodworking with. I didn’t want to spend a lot on a nice set because a) I didn’t know which of the reputable brands I should go for, and b) I had to learn to sharpen chisels and figured I’d be better learning on a cheap set than ruining a set of LNs.

I’ve used the Irwins on a few projects now. I don’t have any mortise chisels yet, so I drilled out my mortises and cleaned them up with the Irwins. They are very roughly machined on the backs and took a lot of flattening (I don’t have a grinder either). They hold an edge reasonably well as far as I can tell.

When I do buy a better set, it will either be the LNs or the Ashley Isles Mk 2s. There’s a big hand tool event in the Sourth of England in a couple of weeks time and I’m hoping to get some hands on with both of them to see which I prefer. I will definitely be getting a set of the Ashley Isles pig stickers though.

-- Andy -- Old Chinese proverb say: If you think something can't be done, don't interrupt man who is doing it.

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1289 days


#26 posted 1234 days ago

Brit, the Iles pigstickers are hard to beat. Once tuned, I’ve never had any problem with the Irwin chisels, although I bob the handle a tad. If you’ve been chopping mortises with Irwins, you’re due for some mortise chisels. Putting in that hard work will only make a set of Iles all the more lovely.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View Les Casteel's profile

Les Casteel

155 posts in 1656 days


#27 posted 1233 days ago

I too would like to weigh in on buying chisels from EBAY. I watched for about 4 weeks. If it was a Stanley #720, #740, or a #750 I watched the price to the end. They didn’t have to be perfect or mint but they had to be pretty good. Then I put it into a spreadsheet to keep track of the average cost of a decent Stanly chisel sold on EBAY. I was amazed. Many, many times the average price for mediocre chisels was up to $55 each, usually about $25 to $35. Now, I really like Stanley chisels, but Lie-Neilson sells wonderful new chisels for….wait for it….. $55 each. So, I bought some Lie-Neilson’s and quit this EBAY junk.

-- Les, Arkansas, www.woodthatrocks.com

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1289 days


#28 posted 1233 days ago

Les, I can certainly relate to your frustration. I was in a desperate search for a Stanley 4 1/2 & tried the same thing with the spreadsheet. To my amazement they ranged from the bargain to the absurd, without any real relationship to quality. It almost seemed random. Chisels are no exception. LN makes excellent chisels, no doubt about it.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View mafe's profile

mafe

9435 posts in 1686 days


#29 posted 1233 days ago

Andy, please send me a personal mail when you have had your hands on the Iles. If my hands came first I will let you know.
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View TechRedneck's profile

TechRedneck

735 posts in 1453 days


#30 posted 1113 days ago

Ok, I’m going to try to revive this thread Al.

After working on a wedding gift this weekend the cheap chisels I have are not hacking it. I’ve decided on the Ashley MK2’s. Now with a budget, I am thinking about trying out three sizes.. 1/4, 1/2, 1” to start. I know I want the 1” because I use my 1” for paring quite a bit.

Any suggestions on the sizes used most often? Should I go for a 1/8”? I want to try them out and bring the set up piece by piece as funds permit. ( I also want to get an Incra TS-LS and have money set aside for that when it goes back on sale) so I can’t afford the full set now.

Mads.. did you get your MK2’s ? how do you like them?

I was looking at the Narex but they only come in metric and all my tools are standard.

-- Mike.... West Virginia. "Man is a tool using animal. Without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all.". T Carlyle

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12246 posts in 2694 days


#31 posted 1113 days ago

I’m currently living with a set of blue marples and a bunch of rehabbed flea market chisels.

Group of Chisels

Chisel

The Ashley Iles chisels really appeal to me. I have a good number of their carving tools and I really like them….

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View TechRedneck's profile

TechRedneck

735 posts in 1453 days


#32 posted 1113 days ago

I was looking at some water stones for sharpening. Yikes! Since I am getting some fine chisels I thought I would need to keep them sharp. I have a granite plate and paper 220 up to 1200 grit. I figure I can use that to grind off the tool marks and will need perhaps a 4000/8000 wet stone to get them where they will shine and keep them there. That will help with the two planes I have as well.

Man.. the wife is going to kill me!

Wayne, thanks for the reply. I am thinking that I may pick up some blue Marples in odd sizes and start filling out the chisel collection. I can’t see using the Ashley’s for beaters.

-- Mike.... West Virginia. "Man is a tool using animal. Without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all.". T Carlyle

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WayneC

12246 posts in 2694 days


#33 posted 1113 days ago

I agree. Everyone needs some beaters.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View TechRedneck's profile

TechRedneck

735 posts in 1453 days


#34 posted 1112 days ago

Placed the order today for the Ashlley Isles from The Best Things in VA. Nice people to deal with. They also had a clearance on a 2” wide 1000/4000 Norton stone for $35.

For vacation this year I also ordered the Anarchist’s Tool Chest. That should turn some heads on the beach!

-- Mike.... West Virginia. "Man is a tool using animal. Without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all.". T Carlyle

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12246 posts in 2694 days


#35 posted 1112 days ago

The best things seems to have the best price on stuff from Ashley Iles. They seem to be cheaper than Tools for Working wood anyway. Sounds like you got a good deal on the stone.

I ordered the Anarchist’s Tool Chest as well. Should be here in the next day or two.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View TechRedneck's profile

TechRedneck

735 posts in 1453 days


#36 posted 1112 days ago

I have most of the power tools that you would need to get the stock down to something I can work with. Schwarz should help me with selection of some nice hand tools to round things out. I went to his website and like what he is doing. I almost pulled the trigger on “The Essential Woodworker” but had to contain myself. I should read one book at a time.

Now I have another issue. I am thinking of moving my DC system (piped with 4”S&D) to make room for a sharpening station next to the utility sink. That way I can get messy with the wet stones and not have to slop up any workbenches. Oh well, there goes another Saturday.

-- Mike.... West Virginia. "Man is a tool using animal. Without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all.". T Carlyle

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1289 days


#37 posted 1112 days ago

Techred, if I had plumbing in my shop, I’d be doing exactly what you’re planning.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View TechRedneck's profile

TechRedneck

735 posts in 1453 days


#38 posted 1112 days ago

Well it should not be too involved. I used thick aluminum duct tape for the joints so I just have to peel or cut it off. I have a long run across the shop to pickup the drill press and a floor sweep. Think I will just do away with that and suck up the press and mortising shavings with the mini cyclone.

If I move the DC then I may have more room for that TS-LS I am drooling over! The fence on my Sears Hybrid is not the best and I ran a gauge over the entire length an found a slight bow in the dam thing. It does fine on stock less than 30”, burns sometimes on cherry and oak. I am tired of messing with it.

I am going to pick up a bunch of rough maple, cherry and oak in the next week and will have some long boards to run through it.

Speaking of chisels.. this is the topic I believe… Any suggestions on a nice paring chisel? or will the 1” Ashley do the trick?

-- Mike.... West Virginia. "Man is a tool using animal. Without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all.". T Carlyle

View mafe's profile

mafe

9435 posts in 1686 days


#39 posted 1112 days ago

Hi Tech,
I really love these chisels, think they are just wonderful.
If you look in my reviews I made a review of them, tell me what you think when you get them.
To me they are holding a tradition and elegance.
They are perfect for parring, just keep the honing bevel then.
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View TechRedneck's profile

TechRedneck

735 posts in 1453 days


#40 posted 1112 days ago

Thanks Mads,

I just came up from the shop and it is getting late. I decided to go ahead and move the DC system to make room for a sharpening station next to the sink. Good thing I did, I noticed that when I originally built it I had to get creative with the fittings. I had a small reduction (edge of pipe) right at the primary separator that was partially clogged with some large chips and a small chunk of wood. I am having second thoughts about the floor sweeps and may go back to a broom for the shavings.

Note to self and others, don’t leave an exposed rough edge of pipe facing the flow of air in the fittings.

Can’t wait to get that package in the mail now. I’ll post some pics and let you know what I think of the Ashley’s. With the new stone I’ll hone up the hand planes as well and make some shavings!

-- Mike.... West Virginia. "Man is a tool using animal. Without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all.". T Carlyle

View mafe's profile

mafe

9435 posts in 1686 days


#41 posted 1112 days ago

Remember that the back is not supposed to be completely flat on them, read in my review why.
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

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DaddyZ

2375 posts in 1637 days


#42 posted 1112 days ago

A witherby, a butcher Gouge, a few stanleys, & others

Just a few auction & garage sale finds, Since this picture I have cleaned them all. Now i need to make some more handels.

Hope to pick up a few more at an estate auction this this weekend, Can see 1 in the picture.

-- Pat - Worker of Wood, Collector of Tools, Father of one

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Bertha

12951 posts in 1289 days


#43 posted 1112 days ago

Tech, I’m an Iles, Witherby, and Butcher guy. I’m also a cheap bluechip and twocherries guy, but that’s not why we’re here. My favorite parers are the Iles and a 1 inch Ohio tools socket that I turned a big, fat, tear-dropped shape handle for of olivewood. I like the big fat swell in my palm and guide the chisel with my finger indexed over the back.

Mads is right! Don’t tinker with the “ruler trick” on the Iles. All my chisels and planes have flat backs; not one has a back bevel. I think the ruler trick has been misunderstood by many.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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Mauricio

6747 posts in 1748 days


#44 posted 1112 days ago

Tech,

I just bought some Iles and they are great. I regret putting a secoundary bevel on my 1” (extra 5degrees)which will be used for pairing. I didnt put a secoundary bevel on the 3/4” and it cuts through end grain with much less effort than the 1”.

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch

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philip marcou

262 posts in 1193 days


#45 posted 1111 days ago

Just in passing…... caught my eye on some web site I can’t recall (two minutes ago) :- “05/19/2009: Mallet Soft – Handle Hard”

How come little attention is paid to this simple truth?

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TechRedneck

735 posts in 1453 days


#46 posted 1110 days ago

Whoo Hoo,... the Isles arrived in just two days from “The Best Things” and The Anarchist’s Tool Chest on the same truck From Lie Nielson. The DC system is all re-piped and tested. I purchased the book for vacation but now can’t decide to start reading it or head to the shop to work on the sharpening station!

The chisels look and feel nice in my hands, and are somewhat sharp right out of the box.

-- Mike.... West Virginia. "Man is a tool using animal. Without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all.". T Carlyle

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WayneC

12246 posts in 2694 days


#47 posted 1110 days ago

Very cool… I’m still waiting on my copy of the book. Supposed to be here on Monday. I also have 3 more Iles carving tools on their way. If the carving tools are an indicator your going to be real happy with the chisels.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

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DonnyBahama

215 posts in 1128 days


#48 posted 1110 days ago

An entire thread about chisels and barely a mention of Japanese chisels. I feel sad for you all.
;)
:P

-- Founding member of the (un)Official LumberJock's Frugal Woodworking Society - http://lumberjocks.com/topics/29451

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WayneC

12246 posts in 2694 days


#49 posted 1110 days ago

Donny, here is your chance to have your day in the Sun…. Lets see some Japanese chisels…

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

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Bertha

12951 posts in 1289 days


#50 posted 1110 days ago

Donny, this is the economy chisel thread;)

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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