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All Replies on Moving to a new shop! Maybe a third of the size though!!! Smart?

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View Sailor's profile

Moving to a new shop! Maybe a third of the size though!!! Smart?

by Sailor
posted 1294 days ago


29 replies so far

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

3650 posts in 2261 days


#1 posted 1294 days ago

Heck, if I had a 13.5’x25’ shop I’d feel like a BB in a box car!

My shop is in half of a two-car garage … and co-exists with two cars in the garage every night!

—Gerry

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View grizzman's profile

grizzman

6782 posts in 1901 days


#2 posted 1294 days ago

i think its a smart move…i think we get to thinking that when were in a large area that we cant do it with less…and i think that is wrong..i think with the tools you have with the proper planning you can have a shop that will easily work for you…if your paying for the space your in now…that means that will be money saved…in fact if i were you , i would use the saved money to expand some and improve the new space…make sure you can stay warm and cool when needed…if you need insulation …then do it…if you make your living from this…you have to have a warm place…my shop is 20×30 and its more then enough to work in…and mine is for pleasure only…good luck with your move…i would do it…and now having to drive to work…gas money saved…would it effect your customer base…if not…its an easy decision …give us pictures…we love pictures

-- GRIZZMAN ...[''''']

View grizzman's profile

grizzman

6782 posts in 1901 days


#3 posted 1294 days ago

well well sailor…i just looked at your home page and see your in dothan…im in a little town called verbena which is at mile post 200 on I65…if your ever this way your more them welcome to stop on by…ive got back problems and don’t travel much , but if i did i would love to stop and see your new shop…but come on by if your this way…i could always use a visit with another wood worker….grizzman

-- GRIZZMAN ...[''''']

View canadianchips's profile

canadianchips

1831 posts in 1595 days


#4 posted 1294 days ago

I moved from a 50’ x 50’ building into a 16×24 car shed that I rent. I kept a few too many tools, so space is to tight. I have had to re-think some of the storage ideas i use. Everything I have is portable, movable.My lumber is in a storage shed that I built outside the workshop (not ideal but works). You say you like to be organized and everything in its place. Allow enough space to continue doing this, then you won’t get overwhelmed ! I used to drive 45 minutes, I like my little shop at home now. Best of luck !

-- "My mission in life - make everyone smile !"

View ND2ELK's profile

ND2ELK

13495 posts in 2372 days


#5 posted 1294 days ago

You do not say if you are renting the bigger building or what you are going to do with it if you own it? Is this a business or a hobby shop? What do you mostly build? I have a 14 X 21 shop and with a little planning you can get a lot of equipment in a shop that size. Most equipment has to be mobile and you need to pull out the pieces you are going to use. Take a look at my shop, you might be surprised how much equipment I have in that space. I do have a shed just out side the back door to hold off-fall, jigs and misc. I store some lumber in the basement and can finish down there if I want. I mostly build projects for friends, church and family. I am doing woodworking because I want to and not that I have to. I am retired, Thank God!

I had a 16 X 24 shop when I had my business for 9 years in ND. All my older project pictures show you the different things I made in that shop with a lot less equipment than I have now. I had a 10”unisaw, power miter box saw, 14” bandsaw, power hand tools and hand tools. Yes you can do woodworking out of a smaller shop. You mostly lose production time. Looking forward to seeing your new shop, if you decide to go that way. Putting a new shop in is a lot of fun and it is nice to be close to home.

-- Mc Bridge Cabinets, Iowa

View docholladay's profile

docholladay

1286 posts in 1657 days


#6 posted 1294 days ago

I only have a 12X24 sized shop. You could look at the photos of my shop on here, but those photos are a little out of date and with all of the clutter, it might discourage you. The key with a small shop is organization. I am constantly coming up with ideas of how to organize things better. You’ll figure it out. Be sure and post photos of the new shop for us. On another site that I participate on, we have a saying, “without pictures – it didn’t really happen.”

Doc

-- Hey, woodworking ain't brain surgery. Just do something and keep trying till you get it. Doc

View patron's profile

patron

12955 posts in 1939 days


#7 posted 1294 days ago

regardless of the shop size
(i’ve had to many to count)
everyone gives it’s own ‘flavor’
to the work environment

and give you the opportunity
to learn newer and different ways of doing things

with your sailor mentality

‘a place for everything
and everything in it’s place’

will bring things forward
you may never have thought of
in a larger shop

that it is home is a plus

you can work in your underwear !

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View richgreer's profile

richgreer

4522 posts in 1672 days


#8 posted 1294 days ago

You’ll have about 340 square feet. I have 400 square feet and I have ever tool you have or plan to get plus lathe, planner, mortising machine, dust collector and grinder. For me it is quite doable if I stay organized and build in good storage.

IF you think out your floor plan carefully this should be doable for you also.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

View spunwood's profile

spunwood

1193 posts in 1434 days


#9 posted 1294 days ago

http://lumberjocks.com/stefang/workshop

-- I came, I was conquered, I was born again. ἵνα ὦσιν ἓν

View Sailor's profile

Sailor

533 posts in 1863 days


#10 posted 1294 days ago

First off, thank you all for the great replies. I believe I will make the move.

To answer a few questions
- I do not rent my current shop. My family owns a few building in town and it is one of them
- It is more of a hobby shop than a business. Although I do comissions from time to time.
- I mostly build medim sized projects with a few larger ones. Medium being an adirondak chair.

I was going to ask about insulating the shop. It was suggested that I do so. I do not plan on cooling the shop but I will be trying to keep it somewhat warm in the winter.

I am thinking 1/2” ply for the walls and I would like to paint it a bright color. White? Grey? Tan? What is a good shop color to brighten the place up and make it look larger.

I do plan on putting all tools on wheels except for my table saw.

Thank you all. I will probably be doing some sort of video journals on the whole process.

-- Dothan, Alabama Check out my woodworking blog! http://woodworkingtrip.blogspot.com/ Also my Youtube Channel's Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/SailingAndSuch

View patron's profile

patron

12955 posts in 1939 days


#11 posted 1294 days ago

wal-mary has 5 gal of ‘hide all’ paint
for $50
it comes in
flat
semi-gloss (washes better)
white and off white
interior or exterior
goes on great
and is cheap

and yes insulation works in both directions
cool in summer
and warm in winter

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View ND2ELK's profile

ND2ELK

13495 posts in 2372 days


#12 posted 1294 days ago

Now that I have read your responses to my questions, I would say, Go Boy Go!!! The better you insullate the easier it is to heat or cool. It takes less time to do either and it holds the temperature longer. I always used white on all my shop walls. There is never too much light in a shop. Do not skimp on lighting and plug ins. Looking forward to seeing your progress.

Tom

-- Mc Bridge Cabinets, Iowa

View dubsaloon's profile

dubsaloon

619 posts in 1392 days


#13 posted 1293 days ago

I would think anyplace you have would be a great place. If you need more space, PVC pipe and a tarp cover would work when the temp is good. If you need any assistance drop me a note.

-- The works of evil people are not the problem. It is the "Good" people standing by and watching not speaking up. Dubsaloon

View Knothead62's profile

Knothead62

2342 posts in 1559 days


#14 posted 1293 days ago

I would paint a semi-gloss white or off-white (eggshell) for lighting effects. I would like to have a shop that size. I want to move into the garage/basement and use the upstairs for my shop, with each room dedicated to one piece of equipment. Wife says no!!!!!

View grizzman's profile

grizzman

6782 posts in 1901 days


#15 posted 1293 days ago

now that i know where you live i would suggest you insulate at least the ceiling…but if you can i would do it all while your doing it…i live in mid state Alabama and have had my shop for 15 years now…with no insulation, and boy its been a fight to get it warm on cold days..and it took lots of wood to keep it that way, well i just got done insulating the ceiling last week with my son…and its made all the difference in the world…i run a wood stove and it will now run me out if i run it to hot…if you want to heat for cheap…i would have a small wood stove…but there are many options for heat…but i suggest it because you can get your own wood and not have money going out the door for your heat…good luck with your decision to move..tom suggested white…i agree…being in a man cave doesn’t mean it has to be dark and dingy…bright and good lighting…ive got a total of 12 4 tube florescent lights in mine and over with my bench i have more lighting to really light things up…good luck..

-- GRIZZMAN ...[''''']

View Sailor's profile

Sailor

533 posts in 1863 days


#16 posted 1293 days ago

Ok, looks like I will insulate it completely and paint it a nice bright white. I will have to check out my plug situation first, luckily 220 is already run to my little bay so I may just have to move it.

Thank you all for your great suggestions.

As I type, the bay is pretty over run with things. For one, a bass boat that will be moved, but also alot of other junk that my step dad decide he had some reason to keep although I can’t figure that reason out for the life of me. Hopefully tomorrow I can get him out there with me to clear some junk out.

I will keep you all updated, what would be.the best way to do that? Blog? This thread? Something else?

-- Dothan, Alabama Check out my woodworking blog! http://woodworkingtrip.blogspot.com/ Also my Youtube Channel's Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/SailingAndSuch

View Cosmicsniper's profile

Cosmicsniper

2199 posts in 1756 days


#17 posted 1293 days ago

As much as I dream of having a big 1000 ft^2 or larger work area, it would just mean that I’d have to work harder to organize it. At 400 ft^2, your typical garage with space left over for the wife to park a car, I seem to have all the space I need once I evict the car and utilize a couple of rolling carts. At least that’s true of the actual milling and woodworking itself.

The only time I wish I had a bigger space is when finishing a project….or for long-term assembly and storage of a project. I’d love to have an extra finishing room and larger assembly area when I don’t have to worry about finishing a project in order to reclaim the space. But I figure that if I had an additional garage bay (another 200 ft^2), it would suffice.

Perhaps if my tools were larger, I’d have a true need for more space. So, for me in my hobby workshop, 600 ft^2 would be optimum, 800 to 1000 ft^2 ideal, and anything bigger a more costly luxury.

Aside: Garages often hold more than just woodworking stuff. If I could get rid of everything that doesn’t belong, I KNOW it’d be enough space. So, if it’s an out-building on the property where you don’t need to store automotive stuff, kids toys, and the occasional miscellaneous box, then I’d say you’d be good to go, especially if you can refit it from the ground-up.

-- jay, www.allaboutastro.com

View Sailor's profile

Sailor

533 posts in 1863 days


#18 posted 1293 days ago

Cosmic-
I like your thinking, an extra finishing room would be very nice. My current shop has one that is closed off from all the sawdust I must say I am going to miss that for sure.

I am fortunate however that only my stuff will be in my shop, no other unnecissary items. Everything will be woodworking related other than two medium sized toolboxes with mechanic tools in them.

-- Dothan, Alabama Check out my woodworking blog! http://woodworkingtrip.blogspot.com/ Also my Youtube Channel's Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/SailingAndSuch

View UncleFester's profile

UncleFester

33 posts in 2784 days


#19 posted 1293 days ago

Sailor, I would rethink the plywood on the walls. I have a 24’ by 32’ shop and used white pegboard on 3 of the 4 walls and love it. You can buy pegboard hooks in bulk and hang everything up. And rearranging it is easy. I have so much “stuff” hung up now that I’ve run out of pegboard!

-- Uncle Fester

View Sailor's profile

Sailor

533 posts in 1863 days


#20 posted 1293 days ago

Uncle Fester
You know I have some pegboard in my shop now and I can never get it to work just right for me. For some reason, the hooks are always falling out and just not cooperating with me. Not sure why, but it has made me stray away from pegboard for a while. But if I decide to try it again I can simply put it over the plywood with a space between the two.

Thanks for the suggestion, I may find a time when pegboard is just what I need.

-- Dothan, Alabama Check out my woodworking blog! http://woodworkingtrip.blogspot.com/ Also my Youtube Channel's Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/SailingAndSuch

View patron's profile

patron

12955 posts in 1939 days


#21 posted 1293 days ago

try ‘french cleats’
they can hold anything
and can be re-arranged as needed
two or three courses
up and down the wall

it has always taken me 6 months
to keep moving things around
until they find their best place
(something i can never anticipate)

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View jim C's profile

jim C

1452 posts in 1696 days


#22 posted 1293 days ago

Uncle Fester, Plastic “keeper gadgets” are available that keep the hooks from falling off

If I didn’t use these I would go nuts with the pegboard hooks. I have three walls of pegboard, and I love it.

-- When I was a boy, I was told "anyone can be President", now I'm beginning to believe it!

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

6914 posts in 1512 days


#23 posted 1293 days ago

While I also have been drooling over getting a floor model drill press, I have managed to get by with my ~18yr old 8” bench top drill press by anchoring it to the bench with clamps. Forget that mine, in the attached image, is an 8” model and consider that you could store a nicer/larger bench top model (with a 3.25” spindle travel and maybe radial movement) in a cubbyhole until needed and then bring it out for use. This might help save that precious floor space for other things.

Just a thought…

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View Pop's profile

Pop

419 posts in 2544 days


#24 posted 1293 days ago

I have a 600 sq. ft. shop. It’s shaped in an “L”. Everything I have is on wheels. It’s a pain. I’m looking foward to a 1200 sq. ft. shop in a new home. I would love to be able to walk from my jointer to my table saw without moving anything. I have a contractor saw, miter saw, radial arm saw, Delta 14 in. bandsaw, Shopsmith, 15 in. Powermatic plane (Bendex head, my new baby), 6 in. jointer, router table, floor buffer, grinder, Powermatic jig saw, scroll saw, midi & full size lathes, belt & disc sander, drum sander, ocalating spindle sander & every portable tool known to mortal man crammed in here. Needless to say IT’S TIGHT! Oh! I forgot my Shopsmith bandsaw & strip sander waiting on standalone stands. I don’t understand downsizing, but the theft of equipment could make a quick change in my thinking.

My walls are pegboard, but I don’t use peg board hooks, I painted the shop bright yellow. It’s bright & cheerful.

Pop

-- One who works with his hands is a laborer, his hands & head A craftsman, his hands, head & heart a artist

View Cosmicsniper's profile

Cosmicsniper

2199 posts in 1756 days


#25 posted 1293 days ago

Jim: My father did his shop entirely in pegboard, though he made the mistake of putting the brown side out. I guess he thought it was more manly that way…it’s too dark as a result.

Still, I love the idea and will likely do two walls that way myself since at some point soon I’ll need to remove some drywall to re-wire my garage shop anyway.

-- jay, www.allaboutastro.com

View Sailor's profile

Sailor

533 posts in 1863 days


#26 posted 1293 days ago

You know, I tried those plastic keepers and the darn things wouldn’t grip the holes good. Possibly poor quality peg board? It was the brown only kind.

On the drill press subject, I know I need one but I don’t know if I need a floor model or a benchtop. It seems the floor models are slightly more capable and not much more expensive. The floor models can’t take up to much floor space so they might be the way to go. Any thoughts?

-- Dothan, Alabama Check out my woodworking blog! http://woodworkingtrip.blogspot.com/ Also my Youtube Channel's Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/SailingAndSuch

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

6914 posts in 1512 days


#27 posted 1292 days ago

For the sake of discussion, I am looking at Grizzly. IMO unless you are planning to buy a 17” or larger drill press, a floor model has no real advantage over the bench top model. At 14” or smaller, both floor and bench top models have the same 3/4hp, 3 1/4” spindle, and 12-speeds and run from $285—$335 +sh.

At 17in floor model you jump up to 1hp, 4 3/4” spindle, and 12 speeds for $545. +sh.
At 20in floor model you jump up to 1 1/2hp, 4 3/4” spindle, and 12 speeds for $615 + sh.

I guess the bottom line is just how big do you really want/need to go? A 14” bench top is about half the price of a 17” floor model. Do you really need that extra spindle length and extra 1/4hp? Only you know for sure.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

3650 posts in 2261 days


#28 posted 1292 days ago

The current issue of Woodworkers Journal has a comparison of bench-top drill presses … might be worth taking a look at.

—Gerry

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View Lochlainn1066's profile

Lochlainn1066

138 posts in 1375 days


#29 posted 1292 days ago

Use hot glue to keep pegboard pegs it. It can be remelted to remove them.

But I prefer french cleats as well, I like having my tools in closed cabinets to keep dust off.

If I could build my dream shop, it would have 3/4 plywood walls painted white and use surface mount power boxes so I could french cleat anywhere. I hate having drywall in my workspace.

-- Nate, thegaragestudio.etsy.com

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